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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
racy. The University found three of her alumni among these commissioners: Isham W. Garrott, from Alabama; Jacob Thompson, from Mississippi, and Samuel Hall, from Georgia. The Assembly of North Carolina had also received an invitation from the State of Alabama to send a delegation to meet similar delegations from other States at MOf these, 245 were from North Carolina, 29 from Tennessee, 28 from Louisiana, 28 from Mississippi, 26 from Alabama, 24 from South Carolina, 17 from Texas, 14 from Georgia, 5 from Virginia, 4 from Florida, 2 from Arkansas, 2 from Kentucky, 2 from Missouri, 2 from California, 1 from Iowa, 1 from New Mexico, 1 from Ohio. They were dirate dead, 312. by place of residence at time of matriculation in the University. Arkansas,1 California,1 Iowa,1 Missouri,1 Texas,4 South Carolina,5 Georgia,7 Virginia,8 Florida,9 Mississippi,11 Tennessee,11 Louisiana,14 Alabama,18 North Carolina,221 By occupation : Editors,2 Civil Engineers,5 Pre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
of enthusiasm. Even before the news of Lee's surrender reached Texas there had been signs of discontent apparent among some of the soldiers who were scattered in regimental and brigade camps principally throughout the southern and what was then the western part of the State—the section of greatest abundance of food supplies. While none openly admitted that the fall of the Confederacy was a possibility, many read in the march of Sheridan through the Valley of Virginia, of Sherman through Georgia, and in Lee's reverses the presage of coming disaster. In some regiments acts of open insubordination had been committed during the early spring. In one instance quite a number of cavalry took a furlough without leave, not deserting, but openly leaving with the avowed intention of visiting their families more than a hundred miles away, and of returning when it should suit their pleasure. They reached their homes, but were not permitted to remain, for their heroic and patriotic wives an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Autobiography of Gen. Patton Anderson, C. S. A. (search)
rom the army up to the present time. There are many incidents connected with my experience which would interest my children if I had time to record them, but I have not. I have hurriedly written some of the prominent facts for their edification hereafter. This is a dark day in the history of the present war, but I believe a brighter will soon dawn upon us. If dissension and and faction does not distract us, we will certainly achieve our independence. The course of some prominent men in Georgia [Toombs and Governor Brown.—E. A. A.] just at this time is much calculated to grieve the spirit of all true Southerners. It is to be hoped that they will desist from their factions, teachings, and practices, and soon unite with the patriots of the land to prosecute with unanimity and vigor the war which our enemies are determined to wage against us. Patton Anderson. Monticello, Fla., Feb. 28, 1865. General Anderson's different commands during the war. Joined a company then bei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate armies. (search)
the Confederate armies. Alabama—Fifty-five regiments and eleven battalions of infantry; five regiments of cavalry; three regiments of partisan rangers, and sixteen batteries of light artillery. Arkansas—Thirty-five regiments and twelve battalions of infantry; six regiments and two battalions of cavalry, and fifteen batteries of light artillery. Florida—Ten regiments and two battalions of infantry; two regiments and one battalion of cavalry, and six batteries of light artillery. Georgia—Sixty-eight regiments and seventeen battalions of infantry; eleven regiments and two battalions of cavalry; one regiment and one battalion of partisan rangers; two battalions of heavy artillery, and twenty-eight batteries of light artillery. Louisiana—Thirty-four regiments and ten battalions of infantry; two regiments and one battalion of cavalry; one regiment of partisan rangers; two regiments of heavy artillery, and twenty-six batteries of light artillery. Mississippi—Forty-nin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
evotion that history loves to linger over. When all the men were absent on the field of war the women nursed the sick and buried the dead. Many a brave boy from Georgia, Mississippi and Louisiana owes his life to the women of Winchester. After each of the great battles, and the numberless skirmishes which crowded upon each otherce of these unknown heroes. Many of the graves of the known, are still surmounted with the wooden headboards placed there when they died, but Maryland, Virginia, Georgia and Louisiana have removed these crumbling memorials and replaced them with marble stones, which will be everlasting. These four States have likewise erected m the 4th of July, is a beautiful granite shaft planted on a slight eminence in one of the prettiest part of the soldiers' cemetery. The specifications called for Georgia granite, with a total height of eighteen feet, the base being four feet three inches square, the second base, the die, the cap and the plinth each being proportio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
lery, 10th, to be called State Troops, and numbered one to ten. This would have caused the numbering of ten regiments each of State Troops and of Volunteers respectively to have been the same, and the numbers of the volunteer regiments were therefore moved forward ten. This will explain a change in the numbering of the regiments to include the 14th Volunteers, afterwards the 24th Troops, which seems not to be understood. A duplication of this sort in the numbering of certain regiments of Georgia and South Carolina troops did actually exist, and caused much confusion. The regiment was first armed as follows: to the two flank companies were issued rifled muskets of a then comparatively recent Springfield pattern. The other eight companies had old-style flintlock muskets, with bright barrels, altered to percussions. All were muzzle loading, and the latter were not effective at more than 200 yards, if that. The cartridges were of paper, to be torn with the teeth, and the cap pouc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The laying of the corner-stone of the monument to President Jefferson Davis, (search)
were each of them of strong Christian faith. Permit me to quote the words of two distinguished men who knew Jefferson Davis most intimately in official as well as private life: Standing here by his open grave, and in all probability not far from my own, said George Davis, of North Carolina, Attorney-General of the Confederacy, I declare to you that he was the most honest, truest, gentlest, tenderest, manliest man I ever knew. I knew Jefferson Davis as I knew few men, said Benjamin Hill, Georgia's great senator. I have been near him in his public duties; I have seen him by his private fireside; I have witnessed his humble devotions, and I challenge the judgment of history when I say no people were ever led through the fiery struggle for liberty by a nobler, truer patriot, while the carnage of war and the trials of public life never revealed a purer or more beautiful Christian character. Jefferson Davis stood the test of true greatness, he was the greatest to those who knew him