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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
as pushed forward with all expedition, reached Petersburg punctually, and from that time to the surrender at Appomattox, was, I may say, constantly under the fire of the enemy in the trenches and fields around Petersburg and on the retreat. General Lee was at that time confronted by Grant at the Rapidan. General W. H. C. Whiting was placed in command of the defences of Petersburg, embracing the line of heavy fixed batteries supported by two small local battalions, about 150 militia, one Georgia battalion, and our brigade of infantry. General Beauregard took his position with about 8,000 effective men at Drewry's Bluff, and all these forces were confronted by Butler's Army of the James, entrenched at City Point and at Cobb's in Howlett's Neck. On the 14th of May, 1864, he presented his plan of strategy to the War Department, at the head of which then were Mr. Seddon and General Bragg. Lee had about 45,000 effective forces; Beauregard about 15,000; and the plan he presented was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
m the night before, and just after the return of the commissioners, that the conference was utterly fruitless; that Mr. Lincoln offered the Confederate States nothing but unconditional submission; that we now had nothing to do but resist to the last, or surrender at discretion. On February 8, 1865 (I am able to give this date from an entry in my diary kept at the time), which was two days after the return of the commissioners, Mr. Stephens in conversation with Hon. Clifford Anderson, of Georgia, and myself, in the Chamber of Representatives of the Confederate States, said that Mr. Lincoln offered the Southern States nothing but unconditional submission — that it was utterly impossible to effect any peaceful negotiations with him; that he offered the Confederate States no terms at all but laying down our arms and trusting entirely to his clemency and that of the United States. Mr. Anderson and I both said that we could only reach those terms in any event, and we saw nothing to be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
e two lines of battle. He quickly discovered the danger of this, as it would have afforded shelter for another assaulting column. He stopped the burial detail and made them level the ground, as they found it. General Pendleton, Chief of Artillery of General Lee's army, was standing near, and paid a high compliment to Mahone's foresight. The last act in the great battle. This was the last act in this celebrated battle—a battle won by the charge of three small brigades of Virginia, Georgia and Alabama troops, numbering less than 2,000 muskets, with the aid of the artillery, which rendered effective service to the charging columns, over an army of 70,000 men behind breast-works, which surrendered to this small force nineteen flags. General B. R. Johnson, who commanded the lines which were broken by the explosion and upheaval of the Crater, in his report of the battle, said: To the able commander and gallant officers and men of Mahone's Division, to whom we are mainly indebt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
. Nearly all of his Generals had fallen, but he had two left who were hosts in themselves, the unconquerable D. H. Hill, and that grand old soldier, Jubal Early. While talking to Grigsby I saw off at a distance in a field, men lying down, and supposed it was a line of battle. I asked Colonel Grigsby why he did not move that line of battle to make it conform to his own, when he said: Those men you see lying over there, which you suppose to be a line of battle, are all dead men. They are Georgia soldiers. It was a stern struggle, but Jackson always expected to hold his lines. I heard him once say: We sometimes fail to drive the enemy from his position. He always fails to drive us. But he was never content with the defensive, however successful or however exhausting. In this most destructive battle he was looking all of that day for a chance to make the counter-stroke. He urged General McLaws, who had been sent to his assistance, to move forward and attack the enemy's right fl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
The Beau Sabreur of Georgia. [from the Augusta, Ga., Chronicle, April, 1897.] A fitting Tribute to the gallant Genernce unavoidable—in mentioning his services on the coast of Georgia and South Carolina, and shall offer this in lieu of the cu in a New York hospital hundreds of miles from his beloved Georgia. Identified with the Cobb Legion. His history was ouR. R. Cobb had organized the legion, he was a noted man in Georgia before it was formed. Though Colonel William G. Deloney wWest Point cadet, he promptly resigned on the secession of Georgia, and offered his services to the Confederacy, and was assiwder mills at Augusta, Beauregard, Bragg, the Governors of Georgia and South Carolina appealed for reinforcements from the Aracuation. He was without a peer as a cavalry officer from Georgia, and was one of Stuart's as well as Hampton's, most trusterland the memory of him who was called the Beau Sabreur of Georgia, the most noted cavalry officer of your State, and one the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
mand at that battle, although it exhibited the nerve and endurance of a host. Its Adjutant, Junius French, was killed there, and among the killed also was Wm. H. Johnston, Captain of Co. K, while the roster places the killed of privates and non-commissioned officers at about fifty-five, and eighty-nine wounded, and fifty-three among the captured and missing. Among the wounded and captured of the 23rd was Captain H. G. Turner, of Co. H, since the war a distinguished member of Congress from Georgia. He is a native of Granville, and brother of Adjutant Vines E. Turner. It is well authenticated that only one officer and not exceeding twenty men of the regiment escaped death, wounding or capture. It was about the 7th of May, 1864, that the brigade, after a season of recreation in the vicinity of Hanover and Taylorsville, received orders to rejoin the army at the Wilderness, near Spotsylvania Court House. General Grant was now in command on the other side. The regiment had a part
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
uring peace with honor. That was not to be. He left the Senate in March, 1861, following not the suggestions of personal ambition or his own interest, but the hard and rugged path of duty. Very soon afterwards the Commonwealth of Virginia sent him as one of her representatives to the new government at Montgomery. He performed that mission. On the 21st of July, 1861, he was called by President Davis to take the position of Secretary of State for the Confederacy, from which Mr. Toombs, of Georgia, had resigned. He filled that important trust with eminent ability until the new, or permanent, Confederate Constitution and Government went into operation on the 22d of February, 1862. Prior to that event the Commonwealth of Virginia elected Mr. Hunter, and, as I remember, unanimously, to the Confederate Senate. It was a most critical period, and demanded the greatest ability and resource, both in the executive and legislative departments of the already hard-pressed Confederacy. Mr.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
tured Major-General McCall. The enemy fought with great desperation and gallantry. Featherstone's brigade was driven back in disorder, and Samuel McGowan, with the 14th South Carolina, came to their rescue with unsurpassed gallantry. On the right, two of our brigades were being repulsed, when Archer, in his shirt sleeves, at the head of his brigade, went in with the Confederate yell. Night was throwing its mantle over this scene of death and carnage, when Gen. J. R. Anderson, with his Georgia brigade, was ordered in, and forming two regiments in line on each side of the road, received the enemy's fire at seventy paces, and then engaged them in mortal combat. The volume of fire as it rolled along the line was terrific; every foot of ground was contested; and when darkness rendered it impossible to prolong the contest, the troops were mingled in such confusion that they wandered into the lines of the enemy in trying to find their respective commands. The Confederates had fail
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
de, doing service on Alleghany and Shenandoah mountains until the fall of 1861, when it was made an artillery company, and was attached to the same brigade till the artillery was made a separate command. After this it was a part of McIntosh's battalion, in General A. P. Hill's corps, until the close of the war. It was mustered into service as the McDowell Guard in honor of Miss Lillie McDowell, then of Lexington, Va., a daughter of Governor James McDowell, now Mrs. E. P. McD. Wolff, of Georgia, who made the company a present of a pair of horses, harness and ambulance, besides furnishing a considerable amount of means for clothing equipment of the company. She also paid a bounty to a young man who was under military age, to go as her personal representative in the war. Her substitute, Alfred Sly, proved himself faithful to the trust until a few days before the fight at Gettysburg, when having been sent out with others on detached service, he was captured and held in prison until
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ndered. Mr. Benjamin's face never revealed what he suffered, but, said Dr. Hoge in relating the incident, I could not refrain from sitting down on the bed and weeping, a habit to which I am not addicted. When Mr. Benjamin set out on his trip southward from Danville shortly after this, he was asked by Dr. Hoge if he was not afraid of being captured. With a significant smile, he replied: I shall never be taken alive. Mr. Benjamin remained with the presidential cavalcade until it reached Georgia, when he separated from his companions. Up to that time he had passed as a French military officer, having a passport in that language, which he spoke like a native. He rode a very tall horse, purchased in South Carolina, and said to be one of the finest in that State. When he left President Davis' party he purchased a cart and horse, and, disguised as a pedler, wearing immense green goggles, he worked his way toward the coast. On one occasion he stopped over night with a gentleman who
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