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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
on. * * * I wouldn't advise any one to seek a prison as a place at which to spend a vacation. Of course there was suffering, hunger and misery among the prisoners at Andersonville. I had my share of it. There was also hunger, misery and suffering at Salisbury and at Rock Island and Elmira, the two latter places right in a land of plenty. The Confederate officer who selected Andersonville gave evidence of his being an engineer of no mean caliber. I don't believe that in the whole State of Georgia a better choice could have been made. The place was healthful and salubrious and the water was good. The ground within the inclosure was not, as has been described by an unfriendly chronicler seemingly with malice aforethought, wet, boggy, miry, and a swamp. Captain Wirz has been so often characterized as a monster of cruelty that one recalls with surprise this description of him by the Union officer: Meeting him in one of his rounds of the prison, I approached and saluted. Cap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade at Fredericksburg. (search)
ed with all speed towards Rapidan station. Burnside bad moved from Warrenton, destined for Richmond. Then began a race between the two great armies which ended at Fredericksburg. McLaws' Division, composed of Kershaw's South Carolina, Semmes' Georgia, Cobb's Georgia and Barksdale's Mississippi Brigades, was under Jackson at that time. It was not a question if we could reach Fredericksburg ahead of Burnside; we were obliged to do so. The weather was very severe. Before reaching Rapidan we cGeorgia and Barksdale's Mississippi Brigades, was under Jackson at that time. It was not a question if we could reach Fredericksburg ahead of Burnside; we were obliged to do so. The weather was very severe. Before reaching Rapidan we crossed two rivers, the North Anna and South Anna, which formed a junction about a mile below where we crossed. Arriving at the North Anna, the men removed their shoes and stripped off their trousers. We were told that the south fork was but a short distance ahead; therefore, all decided to carry shoes and pants under their arms until they had forded the South Anna. The Eighteenth Regiment was leading. Soon after crossing the first river, the road wound around a hill; through a skirt of wo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
hs of all the population of the Southern States. It exceeded by 60,000 that of North Carolina (including what was afterwards Tennessee), of South Carolina and of Georgia, and it was more than a fifth of the population of the whole Union. The great problem to be solved by the Convention of 1788 was, should we continue as thirteen ndemned for urging in the old Continental Congress a treaty of peace with Great Britain, acknowledging the independence of all the States except the Carolinas and Georgia, which were to remain British provinces. The only justification he ever offered was that Georgia and the Carolinas had been conquered and subdued by the armies Georgia and the Carolinas had been conquered and subdued by the armies of Great Britain. The true explanation is supposed to be that Mr. Madison thought that the free navigation of the Mississippi had to be relinquished or the conquered territory surrendered, and he doubtless thought the surrender of the conquered territory the lesser of the two evils. His reply to Henry on the subject of the naviga
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
for farming; but the elder thought better of the South and went to Georgia and settled there, after stopping in Virginia a while. It was tis grandfather had settled in Virginia, instead of Pennsylvania or Georgia; basing the claim on the fact of numerous land patents to an Evan ree Davises was drowned at sea, and that the other did not come to Georgia with Evan. Moreover, there is no John, or Thomas in all the Davien, had the brothers of Evan been so named. After he settled in Georgia and took up lands there, Evan Davis married a widow named Williamsntucky County was named. The pair had eight children during their Georgia life and then Samuel Davis—seeing larger and quick returns for theild of Samuel Davis and Jane Cook, was Joseph Emory Davis, born in Georgia but a lawyer and planter, residing at the Hurricane Plantation, Wat Kentucky was not yielding him the returns hoped for when he left Georgia. He proposed to locate in Louisiana; but, finding the climate unh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Chimborazo hospital, C. S. A. From the News leader, January 7, 1909. (search)
ized May 10, 1866. Maryland, Virginia. North Carolina, South Carolina. Tennessee, Arkansas, Florida. The Epitaph of the Soldier who falls with his Country is written in the Hearts of those who love the Right and Honor the brave. Kentucky, Georgia, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. As soon as the hospital was opened, the large tobacco factories of the Grants, Mayos and others were secured, their business being practically at an end for the period of the war, and the boilers from thund when wanted, and the cause of his death. The organization of Chimborazo hospital was as follows: Surgeon James B. McCaw, commandant and medical director. First Division, Virginia—Surgeon P. F. Brown, of Accomac, Va. Second Division, Georgia—Surgeon Habersham, of Atlanta, Ga. Third Division, North Carolina—Surgeon E. Harvey Smith. Fourth Division, Alabama—Surgeon S. N. Davis. Fifth Division, South Carolina—Surgeon E. M. Seabrook, Charleston, S. C. The medical staff numbe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
, 1861; general, C. S. A, June 14, 1861; general-in-chief, January 31, 1865; died at Lexington, Va., October 12, 1870. Commands—In command of operations in Trans-Alleghany Department, 1861; in charge of defenses on coast of South Carolina and Georgia, 1861-1862; commanding Army of Northern Virginia, June, 1862; assigned to duty at Richmond, 1862, charged with the conduct of all military operations of the Confederate States army, under the direction of the President; commanding Army of Northearolina Regiments, Wilson's Battalion and Manley's North Carolina Battery of Artillery; commanding Eighth Military District, South Carolina, 1861-62; command consisting of Donelson's and Gregg's Brigades; commanding Department of South Carolina, Georgia and East and Middle Florida, 1862; assigned, October 4, 1862, to command of Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana; assigned, October 10, 1862, to the command and relieve Major-General Van Dorn of command of Army of Tennessee; resigned as
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
and refused. From the times-dispatch, February 17, 1907. Colonel David Twiggs Hamilton, of Georgia, tells this story of why Alexander H. Stephens was not elected President of the Southern Confedns, said Chestnut, the delegation from my State has' been conferring and has decided to look to Georgia for a President. Well, sir, Mr. Stephens replied, we have Mr. Toombs, Mr. Cobb, Governor Jee and defeated Jeff Davis for Governor. They acted in Mississippi just about as they did in Georgia. They declared their willingness to sustain and defend; but for success in this movement we muwhat Mr. Stephens' inclination was, and I had heard his prayer the night after the secession of Georgia. If I am the unanimous choice of the delegates, as well as the States, and can organize a cs, General Sparrow and Henry Marshall, of Louisiana; Morton and Owen, of Florida, and the whole Georgia delegation. Toombs was the spokesman, and I never saw him in a better humor or looking handsom
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
The Location of the battle Abbey decided. From the News leader, January 1, 1909. Mrs. Anne S. Green, of Culpeper, who has returned from Georgia, where she attended the United Daughters of the Confederacy convention, put before that body the following correspondence, showing how the movement to have the Confederate Battle Abbey placed in Virginia first took form, twelve years ago: Editor of the Times: The Battle Abbey of the Confederacy should be upon Virginia soil, not necessarily in Richmond, for want of space. God's acres of Confederate blood and bones, which lie under the soil along the Chickahominy, at Cold Harbor, Malvern Hill, and innumerable other points, all speak eloquently for Virginia to be chosen-this State, where the seven days fight in McClellan's On to Richmond occurred; where the flower of Southern chivalry made their pyres' of mortal remains, blood spilled then which has now become with the soil indigenous—the most fitting place to choose to make this B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Brilliant Page in history of War. From the Birmingham age-herald, February 4, 1906. (search)
and stubborn fighting the battle of the Crater, where the loss on the Federal side was five thousand and on the Confederate side one thousand eight hundred, out of the small number engaged, and all on about two acres of land. For quite awhile after the explosion all was quiet, but then commenced a severe cannonade by the Yankees, which was promptly replied to by the Confederate artillery. Soon orders were received for two of our brigades to move to the point of attack. The Virginia and Georgia brigades, being on the right of the division, were withdrawn from the works in such a manner as not to be seen by the enemy, who were entrenched in strong force immediately in our front, and dispatched as directed. This occurred about 8 or 9 o'clock. About II o'clock an order came, delivered by that gallant officer, R. R. Henry, of Mahone's staff, for the Alabama (Wilcox's old) brigade. We were quietly withdrawn from the works, leaving the space which the three brigades had covered unoccu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Virginia Battlefield Park. (search)
the Army of the Potomac; General Daniel E. Sickles; Governor W. A. Stone, of Pennsylvania, and ex-Governor Beaver, of that State; ex-Secretary of the Navy Tracy; General Felix Agnew, of the Baltimore American; General F. D. Grant, Charles Broadway Rouss, ex-Governor Chamberlain, of Maine; Congressman Amos Cummings, ex-Senator Faulkner, of West Virginia; Judge Walter James K. Jones, of Arkansas, General M. C. Butler, of South Carolina; General James Longstreet and Congressman Livingston, of Georgia; Chief Justice Woods, of Mississippi; ex-Senator Blackburn, of Kentucky; Senator Caffery, of Louisiana; Senator Bate and Congressman Richardson, of Tennessee; Congressman Lanham, and ex-Congressman Culberson, of Texas; besides very many more equally as prominent. All of these gentlemen not only consented to become members of the association, but are warmly in favor of the Fredericksburg park. III. Virginia has, through her Legislature, taken up the Fredericksburg Park proposition as a
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