hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 17, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Yankees advanced in force about two miles on our right. They hold Massaponax Church. All quiet to day-no firing. Immense Yankee trains are passing from the telegraph and plank roads to Fredericksburg. They can be seen from Hicks's Hill. M. Slaughter. The Danville Railroad. Spears's raiding party has made no further demonstration against the Danville railroad, and accounts of the destruction of property on the Southside road are contradictory. The enemy repulsed in Northern Georgia. A dispatch was received at the War Department yesterday, from Gen. Jos. E. Johnston, dated Dalton, May 15th, in which it is stated that the enemy made several assaults upon his position on Saturday last, and were repulsed. From Southwestern Virginia. We have some further accounts from Southwestern Virginia, though the news is not of so positive a character as that received at the War Department, and published yesterday. It is stated that the greater portion of the raiding
the campaign. Stone is pronounced without fault in the matter. At the time the messenger left, eight iron clad gunboats were above the fails, unable to reach Alexandria on account of low water, and unprotected by land forces. The Eastport had been blown up. Admiral Porter's dispatches, while act going into, so much detail concerning army operations, fully confirm the general conclusions as to the character of the generalship of Gen Banks. The movements of the Federals in North Georgia. Sherman was ready, according to Yankee accounts to move on Gen. Johnston on the first of this month. Orders had been issued allowing no tents for the men, and but two wagons to a regiment. All surplus baggage was to be left behind. The force of Confederates at Dalton was estimated at 35,400, a large number, it was said, having been withdrawn to go to Lee. The Nashville correspondence of the Chicago Journal prospects the advance of Sherman, and says: It will, indeed, be a ha