hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 682 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 358 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 258 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 208 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 204 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 182 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 102 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 86 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 72 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Illinois (Illinois, United States) or search for Illinois (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Secession Barbarities.--The following is an extract from a letter front a gentleman of the highest respectability in Illinois, to his friend in Albany, N. Y., dated Oct. 26: Yes, my dear Sir, we live too near the borders of Missouri not to feel intensely excited by the scenes that are being enacted in that State. Secession and rebellion are rampant on the very borders of Illinois. The newspapers have informed you of the undermining of a railroad bridge by the rebels, by which scores Illinois. The newspapers have informed you of the undermining of a railroad bridge by the rebels, by which scores of men, women, and children were suddenly sent into eternity, and great numbers, who were not killed outright, were maimed for life. Scenes equally brutal, though not so destructive, by wholesale, of human life, are every day perpetrated by the Secesh of Missouri. A more cowardly set of savages does not exist. Two of my three sons are now in the Union army. The oldest is captain of a company, but Frank, our youngest boy, is only a private. Both are in the field in Missouri, and both have fr
nstant think of surrendering them to the enemies of their country and of their father. His last words were, Tell them to obey the Constitution and the laws of the country, and Mrs. Douglas will not make herself the instrument of disobeying his dying injunction. The children, she says, belong to Illinois, and must remain in the North. Illinois and the North, we take it, will see to it that they are not sufferers by the devotedness and patriotism of their mother.--Louisville Journal, Dec. 20. nstant think of surrendering them to the enemies of their country and of their father. His last words were, Tell them to obey the Constitution and the laws of the country, and Mrs. Douglas will not make herself the instrument of disobeying his dying injunction. The children, she says, belong to Illinois, and must remain in the North. Illinois and the North, we take it, will see to it that they are not sufferers by the devotedness and patriotism of their mother.--Louisville Journal, Dec. 20.
which were ready to die, Under whose potent charms old Abe would be able To lay all his griefs, like a bill, “on the table ;” Or, shut up his woe, like a horse, in a stable. He sat in his chair, With a woe-begone air, Gazing at nothing with a meaningless stare, And looked like a wild beast just “skeered” in his lair. His cheek-bones were high, and his visage was rough, Like a middling of bacon, all wrinkled and tough; His nose was as long, and as ugly and big, As the snout of a half-starved Illinois pig; He was long in the legs, and long in the face, A Longfellow born of a long-legged race, Yet longing through grace for a much longer space, Till he'd finished his political wild-goose chase-- Bringing wreck on his country, and endless disgrace On the blockheads who'd placed him in “the very wrong place.” The news had just reached him of rout and defeat, Of his “Grand Army” broken — of disastrous retreat ; His best men were slain on the field of the fight; His legions were sca