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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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ty-five years of age. Three fourths of them are grey-headed, and many have long white beards, giving them a venerable appearance. Many have sent their sons to the field, and are now following them. One of the arts by which the Southern heart is fired is this: Soon after the battle of Murfreesboro, the rebel General Bragg caused to be printed and widely circulated in the army counterfeits of the Nashville Union, in which was conspicuously displayed Startling News! Four States Seceded from the Old Government! Missouri, Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky! This was followed by an editorial bewailing the loss of these States. Of course the whole affair was a forgery, but the illiterate soldiery of the South, a large proportion of whom cannot read at all, could not detect it. While Buckner was in Kentucky, bogus copies of the Louisville Journal were freely circulated by the rebels, filled with all kinds of matter adapted to inflame and encourage the rebels, and discourage the loyal.
urned out, etc. In five minutes the camp was in a perfect uproar, and filled with all sorts of rumors; some thought the enemy were upon them, it being so unusual to have parades when on a march. At half-past 6 the parade was formed, ten columns deep, and nearly a quarter of a mile in length. After the usual routine of ceremonies the Acting Assistant Adjutant-General read the following order: Special order, no.--.Headquarters, army in the field. Lieutenant Wickfield, of the----Indiana cavalry, having on this day eaten everything in Mrs. Selvidge's house, at the crossing of the Ironton and Pocahontas and Black River and Cape Girardeau roads, except one pumpkin pie, Lieutenant Wickfield is hereby ordered to return with an escort of one hundred cavalry and eat that pie also. U. S. Grant, Brigadier-General Commanding. Grant's orders were law, and no soldier ever attempted to evade them. At seven o'clock the Lieuten ant filed out of camp with his hundred men, amid the c
ctor, went down the ward to hunt him up. She saw this dying man and had compassion on him, and said: O doctor! let me bring to the man my bed, to keep him off the floor. The doctor said: The man is dying; he will be dead to-morrow. To-morrow came, and old Hannah could not rest. She went to see the man and he was still alive. Then she got some help, took her bed, put the man on it, and carried him bodily to her shanty; then she washed him all over, as a woman would a baby, and fed him with a spoon, and fought death hand to hand day and night, and beat him back and saved the soldier's life. The day before I went to Jefferson the man had gone on a furlough to his home in Indiana. He besought Hannah to go with him, but she could not spare time; there was all that washing to do. She went with him to the steamboat, got him fixed to her mind, and then she kissed him, and the man lifted up his voice as she left him and wept like a child. I say we have grown noble in our sufferings.
Nashville, June 1. The most extraordinary case of surviving apparently mortal wounds that has ever come under my observation is that of John W. Vance, company B, Seventy-second regiment of Indiana mounted infantry, commanded by Colonel Miller. Early in April I made a brief report of the case from Murfreesboro; but at that time I had no idea of the severity of the wounds. The demoniacal malignity that could have induced any one bearing the human form to have inflicted such wounds under the circumstances, seems almost beyond conception. While the regiment to which young Vance belonged was scouting near Taylorsville, Tennessee, he and a companion were taken prisoners. During the next twenty-four hours their captors treated them kindly. They neither saw nor heard any thing to lead them to suspect that any different treatment was in store for them till they came within a mile or two of Lebanon. Here the rebels wished to be free from the care of their prisoners. They therefore
Munchauseniana. Mr. J. D. Howe, of the First Missouri regiment, informs us that on the second inst. two regiments, one from Kentucky and the other from Indiana, rebelled at Rienzi, Miss., and started South with their arms. Four regiments of Wisconsin troops were sent to intercept them, when a fight ensued, lasting from Saturday morning until night. The Kentuckians and Indianians drove the Wisconsin regiments six miles in the direction of Corinth. At sundown the Federals were reenforced by two Illinois regiments, who came up in the rear of the rebels and compelled them to surrender. They were arrested and sent to Chicago. An eye-witness who walked over the field says he counted three hundred and fifty-three killed; and another, who spent more time, says he counted over six hundred dead.--Jackson Mississippian, August 25.
ld have walked for two hundred yards down that ditch on dead rebels without touching, the ground. Of course Colonel Wilder doesn't claim that his brigade defeated Longstreet. His statement refers only to that portion of the corps which entered the field in his front. He thinks that not less than two thousand rebels were killed and wounded in this field. It was probably the most disastrous fire of the two days fight on either side. On Sunday, Colonel Edward A. King, of the Sixtyeighth Indiana, then commanding a brigade, was killed by a rebel sharp-shooter concealed in a tree. The shot struck him, in the forehead, killing him instantly. Colonel Grose, reported killed, was not hurt. In a skirmish of Wilder's brigade with Forrest, a few miles from Dalton. Georgia, three days before the battle, Forrest was so badly wounded that he was unable to take his command during the battle. General Joe Johnston accompanied Forrest's brigade, and narrowly escaped being captured. The sam