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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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wars between the North and the South; Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri do not intend that their peaceful channels of commerce shall become rivers of blood to gratify the ambition of South Carolina and Alabama, who at a remote distance from present danger cry out disunion. I have said that the South has all along had a peaceful remedy and has it still. The union sentiment is overwhelming in all the Middle and Western States, constituting two-thirds of the republic. Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois are as little inclined to become frontier States as Maryland, Virginia, and Kentucky. Had the present Administration cut loose from the disunionists, instead of virtually ministering to their designs, and planted itself firmly on union ground, the secessions at Charleston and Baltimore would never have occurred, the constitutional union party would have been an impossibility, the democracy would have recovered its ascendency in the North, and an united party, embracing two-th
mine it. After a feeble and futile defence of the right of secession, they present the Personal Liberty Laws of some of the Northern States as a justification; concerning which they say: We assert that fourteen of the States have deliberately refused for years past to fulfil their constitutional obligations, and we refer to their own statutes for the proof. * * * The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa have enacted laws which either nullify the acts of Congress, or render useless any attempt to execute them. In many of these States the fugitive is discharged from the service or labor claimed, and in none of them has the State Government complied with the stipulation made in the Constitution. The State of New Jersey, at an early day, passed a law in conformity with her constitutional obligations; but the current of anti-slavery feeling has led her more rece
the border Slave States--the inevitable consequence of which will be, not only that those States will lose a much larger number of slaves than heretofore, but that in a few years slavery will disappear from them altogether. The truth is, there is but one safety for the slave interests of the border States, and that is in having friendly neighbors on the north of them, and not only friendly neighbors, but friendly, stringent, coercive, penal legislation. With Pennsylvania, and Ohio, and Indiana, and Illinois, and Iowa, made enemies of — as enemies, and bitter enemies, secession will surely make them — no human power can prevent the extinction of slavery in the States of Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri. Fire will not more effectually reduce the fagot to cinders, or water extinguish flame, than secession will bring slavery in those States to annihilation. To bring the matter home, if with a stringent fugitive slave law, executed (as I think) with all reasonable fideli
he Government consists of three distinct Departments, the Executive, Judicial, and Legislative; and that it is the duty of every one to sustain these departments with all the constitutional power which may be necessary and proper for the preservation of the Government in its principles, vigor, and integrity, and to stand by the flag which represents the Government, the Union, and the country. Mr. Holman remarked, while the gentleman censures the Administration, he and his constituents were, he supposed, for its support now. Mr. Vallandigham replied that he was responsible to his constituents for his public course, and not to the gentleman from Indiana, at whose instance the Holman gag was yesterday adopted. Mr. Stevens made no remarks, though the rules allowed him an hour to do so, but simply sanction. moved that the Committee rise, which motion prevailed. The Loan bill was then passed:--Yeas, 149; Nays, 5, namely :--Messrs. Burnet, Reid, Norton, Vallandigham, and Wood.
nded to run, but they only fell down in the bushes and behind rocks. This drew the enemy from their intrenchments, when our boys let into them with their Enfield and Minie rifles, and I never heard such screaming in my life. The Nineteenth, in the mean time, advanced to a fence in a line with the breastworks, and fired one round. The whole earth seemed to shake. They then gave the Indiana boys a tremendous cheer, and the enemy broke from their intrenchments in every way they could. The Indiana boys had previously been ordered to fix bayonets. We could hear the rattle of the iron very plainly as the order was obeyed. Charge bayonets was then ordered, and away went our boys after the enemy. One man alone stood his ground, and fired a cannon, until shot by a revolver. A general race for about three hundred yards followed through the bush, when our men were recalled and re-formed in line of battle, to receive the enemy from the intrenchments at the foot of the mountains, as we su
ipments. This action must speak for itself. To pursue and overtake an enemy having twelve hours the advance; a forced march of nearly thirty miles in less than twenty-four hours, over the worst of roads, and with scarcely a mouthful of food for the men — some, indeed, being thirty-six hours without nourishment; fight a battle, cut off the baggage train, capture the cannon, and rout the enemy, is not a feat of every day record, even in times of war. All honor to the gallant soldiers from Indiana and Ohio, and the true men of Virginia! They prove themselves worthy of the inheritance their fathers bequeathed to them, and as ready to sacrifice their lives to preserve, as their sires were to establish, the independence of the people, and the Union of the States. New York Tribune narrative. Grafton, Va., July 15, 1861. In my last letter I left Gen. Garnett in full retreat across the country, and Gen. Morris in possession of his camp at Laurel Hill. There was little time
Doc. 146.-speech of Joseph Holt, to the Kentucky troops under Gen. Rousseau, at camp Jo Holt, in Indiana, delivered July 31, 1861. Fellow-Citizens and Soldiers:--I say citizens, since you still are such, and it is only because you have resolved that no earthly power shall rob you of this proud title, or in any manner curtail can only be enjoyed amidst the ruins of our country. No Spartan hero, under the grandest inspirations of patriotism, ever uttered nobler sentiments than these. Indiana and Kentucky, it is true, are separated by a broad river, but in their history it has proved only a thread of light and beauty, across which their hands and theiron my father's farm upon the banks of yonder river, and in the light of the morning and of the evening sun my eyes rested upon the free homes and grand forests of Indiana. I played upon her hills, and fished in her streams, and mingled with her people, when I was too young to know, what I trust I shall never be old enough to learn
s of the enemy, seeking to advance upon us every hour, and talk about nice questions of constitutional construction as to whether it is war or merely insurrection? No, sir. It is our duty to advance, if we can; to suppress insurrection; to put down rebellion; to dissipate the rising; to scatter the enemy; and when we have done so, to preserve in the terms of the bill, the liberty, lives, and property of the people of the country, by just and fair police regulations. I ask the Senator from Indiana, (Mr. Lane,) when we took Monterey, did we not do it there? When we took Mexico, did we not do it there? Is it not a part, a necessary and indispensable part, of war itself, that there shall be military regulations over the country conquered and held? Is that unconstitutional? I think it was a mere play of words that the Senator indulged in when he attempted to answer the Senator from New York. I did not understand the Senator from New York to mean any thing else substantially but this
nimated appearance as a young city. The enemy's camp extended from the head of the valley, overlooked on the north, east, and west sides by hills and ridges two or three hundred feet in height southward about a mile, thence eastward a mile and a half, and then southward half a mile, following the windings of the creek, along whose banks the gently sloping hills on either side afforded the most excellent camping ground. Near the northern end of the valley lived John McNary, formerly from Indiana, who, finding the rebels within five miles, on Tuesday last packed up his few worldly goods, took his family, and started for the good old Hoosier State, where it is not a crime to be loyal to the Government under which we live. Not less than twenty or thirty families, living on farms in the vicinity, started about the same time, most of them having little or no idea where they were going, except to escape from the danger which threatened them. The battle-field viewed by your correspond
nimated appearance as a young city. The enemy's camp extended from the head of the valley, overlooked on the north, east, and west sides by hills and ridges two or three hundred feet in height southward about a mile, thence eastward a mile and a half, and then southward half a mile, following the windings of the creek, along whose banks the gently sloping hills on either side afforded the most excellent camping ground. Near the northern end of the valley lived John McNary, formerly from Indiana, who, finding the rebels within five miles, on Tuesday last packed up his few worldly goods, took his family, and started for the good old Hoosier State, where it is not a crime to be loyal to the Government under which we live. Not less than twenty or thirty families, living on farms in the vicinity, started about the same time, most of them having little or no idea where they were going, except to escape from the danger which threatened them. The battle-field viewed by your correspond
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