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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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remont, Port Republic, Va., June 9. You have received telegraphic intelligence of a severe battle having been fought on yesterday, and no doubt all your readers are anxious for details of the engagement. Yesterday we expected would be a more severe struggle than ever. Many thought the rebels to be in force in their old position, while others were of the opinion that they would make a final stand at or near this place. This, in connection with a desire to present you a list of Ohio and Indiana killed and wounded, has induced me to delay writing till to-day. Sunday morning dawned bright and beautiful. The birds were singing their sweet melodies as if in worship of Him who made the Sabbath, and the soft air that came balmily from the South, reminded us that the summer was well-nigh here. A movement had been ordered that morning. They say that history shows that battles begun on Sunday seldom are successes for the attacking party. Whether this will prove an exception to the g
ckley. Refreshed by the halt, the army on Friday advanced to Wardensville, twenty miles distant. A reconnoissance had been made the day before by Lieut.-Col. Downey, of the Third Maryland regiment, Potomac Home Brigade, who, with one company of Indiana cavalry, explored both roads and the village. On his return he was halted by a rebel within thirty feet, and challenged. As he drew his pistol to reply, the soldier raised his carbine and fired. The ball struck the horse of Colonel Downey, anell, rode in. The First New-Jersey cavalry, Col. Halstead, came up shortly afterward, and with his regiment and the rest of his force, Gen. Bayard was ordered to press forward as rapidly as possible on the rear of the flying enemy. Stewart's Indiana and Sixth Ohio cavalry, under Col Zagonyi, who arrived very soon after, were also sent on, and in a few minutes Buell's and Schirmer's batteries, and the rest of the light artillery under Col. Pilsen, as fast as it could be brought to the front,
s accordingly ceased firing, and after making considerable of a detour, the Forty-sixth attacked the batteries in the rear, delivering their fire as they came up, charging over the guns and killing the gunners at their posts. The rebels fought stubbornly, asking no quarter, and receiving none from the men of the Forty-sixth, who were enraged at the dastardly firing upon the helpless men in the river; only two of those who were in the battery were taken prisoners, the rest were killed. The Indiana troops then came over the brow of the ridge and down into the wooded bottom-land next the river in pursuit of those who had been firing on the Mound City's crew, the rebels retreating rapidly up the bank of the river, the Forty-sixth firing on them as they fled, killing the greater portion of them. In the flight, Capt. Fry, their commander, was wounded by a ball in the back, was captured, and is now a prisoner on board the Conestoga. The rebel loss in killed is not known, but must have in
eut.-Colonel wood. headquarters First Indiana cavalry, Helena, Ark., July 15, 1862. Col. Conrad Baker, Commanding Fourth Brigade: sir: In obedience to your order, on the seventh inst., I proceeded with the Second battalion First regiment Indiana cavalry, and two steel rifled guns to the bridge across Bayou de View, which we fortunately succeeded in saving from destruction, the rebels having built a fire at the north end, ready to burn it. This we prevented by cautiously approaching theif infantry hurrying toward our camp on Cache River, who informed us that they had been badly used up; Col. Hovey, Thirty-third Illinois volunteers, with about four hundred infantry and one gun under the command of Lieut. Denneman, First regiment Indiana cavalry, had been fighting with the rebels and had retreated before a very large force, having a great number of men killed and wounded. Increasing our speed, we arrived at Round Hill, and the first squad of infantry we saw ran from us, supposi
his duty. Among the most active and daring, and at the same time most conspicuous, was Adjutant Royston, whose chivalric bearing was observed wherever duty called and danger was to be met. He was cool on all occasions, and a stranger to fear. Upon Col. Wharton was conferred the honor of bringing the prisoners through to this city, where they arrived safely to-day. He was accompanied by company B, of the Texan rangers. Among the forty-five officers is found Gen. T. T. Crittenden, of Indiana, with one colonel, two lieutenant-colonels, one major, eleven captains and twenty-nine lieutenants. Col. Forrest had previously paroled about eleven hundred privates. Over three hundred mules and horses, with some fifty wagons, were captured. With these a splendid lot of arms, some ammunition, stores, etc. A large amount of quartermaster and commissary stores was destroyed. In brief, every thing was brought away or destroyed, thus making a clean sweep. It was a complete surprise to the
e, and two pieces in rear of the right. All of these pieces were of Manning's battery, and were posted on either side of the knoll in the Government cemetery. Next came the Fourteenth Maine, posted in rear of the Bayou Sara road, and to the left of Greenwell Springs road. Next came the Twenty-first Indiana, posted in the woods in rear of Magnolia cemetery, with four pieces of Everett's battery (under the command of Lieutenant Carruth) on their left on the Greenwell Springs road. The Indiana battery of two pieces came up to the support of these pieces after the battle commenced. Next came the Sixth Michigan, posted across the country-road, on the right of the Magnolia cemetery, and across the Clay Cut road, their left supporting two pieces of Everett's battery, posted on the road, on the right of the Magnolia cemetery. The Seventh Vermont was posted in rear of the Twenty-first Indiana and Sixth Michigan, on the right of the Catholic cemetery. The Thirtieth Massachusetts ca
wound was a fatal one, and preferred remaining behind Upon the fall back, Gen. Breckinridge ordered the various camps and stores of the enemy to be destroyed. This was accordingly done, and a vast amount of property was burned. There were huge piles of pork, beef, bacon, flour, whisky, molasses, and sugar, quantities of clothing, at which our troops looked wistfully, all given to the flames. The encampments were those of the Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New-Hampshire, Michigan, and Indiana regiments. There was an air of comfort about all of the tents, and luxurious appointments in many of them. The sutler's stores were crowded with delicacies. But nothing escaped. Many letters, pictures, and documents were picked up, but the boys brought away no booty. Had our means of transportation been more extensive, we could have brought off a month's supply for our army. Gen. Breckinridge intrusted the delicate and important duty of holding the field to Capt. John A. Buckner, hi
n's Hill, Va., September 2. Hon. O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana: dear sir: I most respectfully submit the following rep This is not doubted; but at the same time a few thousand Indiana and two hundred Ninety-fifth men were hidden from his view. To His Excellency Oliver P. Morton, Governor of the State of Indiana: The first brigade of the army of Kentucky, to whiunded and missing, one. To Laz Noble, Adjutant-General of Indiana: The undersigned would respectfully report the conditio, cannot be wholly without interest to the people of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky, and especially to those whose husbands, fathy different roads. In the mean time, a number of Ohio and Indiana regiments had reached here to reinforce Gen. Nelson; and th, Md., September 20, 1862. Hon. O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana: dear sir: I most respectfully submit to you the followrigade. Official report of Colonel Harrow, four-teenth Indiana. battle-field, near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 19. G
, but too late for action. I desire to particularly notice the conduct of Captain Dunham, A. A.G., First New-Jersey brigade, whose exertions to rally the broken columns of his brigade were untiring. Very respectfully, etc., etc., R. P. Kennedy, Lieutenant and A. A.A. G., First Brigade. Col. E. P. Scammon, Commanding First Brigade. Colonel Meredith's report. headquarters Gibbon's brigade, camp of Nineteenth Indiana, Upton's Hill, Va., September 2. Hon. O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana: dear sir: I most respectfully submit the following report of the part taken by the Nineteenth Indiana volunteers in the battle of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth of August, 1862, at Bull Run: At one o'clock A. M., on the twenty-ninth, we left Manassas for Bull Run. Arriving on the battle-field, we were immediately ordered to support Captain Campbell's battery of Gibbon's brigade, which was then moving down to the engagement. A line of battle was formed in rear of the battery, in whi
ays: We continued falling back for about one and a half miles. This is not doubted; but at the same time a few thousand Indiana and two hundred Ninety-fifth men were hidden from his view in an encircling storm of cannon-shot and musketry. Sanitaof Lieutenant-Colonel Korff. Cincinnati, September 5, 1862. To His Excellency Oliver P. Morton, Governor of the State of Indiana: The first brigade of the army of Kentucky, to which the Sixty-ninth Indiana belonged, was ordered from their camnine; wounded and paroled, three; wounded and escaped, one; wounded and missing, one. To Laz Noble, Adjutant-General of Indiana: The undersigned would respectfully report the condition of company H, Capt. Kerr, Sixty-ninth Indiana volunteer infahat ever-memorable engagement, from the pen of any one present, cannot be wholly without interest to the people of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky, and especially to those whose husbands, fathers, brothers and sons there offered up their lives in the def
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