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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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en prisoners, represent the number of wounded as being very large. We took sixty-five prisoners. Brigadier-General McGinnis, being very ill, was not able to be on the field. The troops of the division behaved admirably under the command of Brigadier-General Cameron, of the First, and Colonel Slack, of the Second brigade. The action of General Burbridge was gallant and judicious, from the time I first saw him until the close of the engagement. The conduct of the Sixty-seventh regiment Indiana infantry was inexplicable, and their surrender can only be attributed to the incompetency or cowardice of the commanding officer. They had not a single man killed. Our mounted force, under Colonels Fonda and Robinson, though very small, behaved very handsomely. I left at Carrion Crow Bayou, to hold that position, three regiments of the Third division, namely, the Eleventh Indiana, Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, and Twenty-fourth Iowa, with one section of artillery. It was fortunate that I did
d stand of arms, and five hundred prisoners. Our loss was one killed and two wounded, and a few stragglers. About the time of Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania, the rebel General John H. Morgan, with a large guerrilla band, attempted a raid into Indiana and Ohio, intending probably to recross the Ohio into West-Virginia or Pennsylvania, and join Lee's army. His force consisted of six pieces of artillery and some three thousand cavalry. This band of robbers and murderers destroyed much public l instructions, a number of despatches of the same purport as the above were sent to him. Generals Schofield and Pope were directed to send forward to the Tennessee line every available man in their departments, and the commanding officers in Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, were ordered to make every possible exertion to secure General Rosecrans's lines of communication. General Meade was urged to attack General Lee's army while in its present reduced condition, or at least prevent him from se
ield to our left were swarming with graybacks. They charged us the second time, and would, no doubt, ultimately have overwhelmed us, had not the First Tennessee calvary, Colonel Jim Brownlow, by a well-timed counter-charge, driven them from our left, while we poured a heavy fire into their front, causing them to beat a hasty retreat. But doggedly they rallied and advanced again, calmly filling up the gaps we made in their ranks, cheering loudly all the while. This advance was to take the Indiana battery, which had made terrible havoc among them, besides having silenced several of their guts; and they had well-nigh accomplished their purpose, and were only fifty yards from us, when Colonel Young gave the order to cease firing. He had just received orders to hold that strip of woods, and hold it he would, at all hazard. Our artillery was on the eve of being lost. What few men were left to man the guns were doing all they could to get them away. Again the order was, Fix bayonets!
he next morning the prisoners and the long contraband train, with the cavalry and artillery, were sent forward to Norfolk, when General Wild started with the remainder of his brigade for Indiantown, fifteen miles distant, in Camden County, at which point Colonel Draper had been ordered to join him. At first, the country was poor, and the houses were mean and far apart. But about noon we struck another road, and entered a region of great beauty and fertility, reminding one of the scenery of Indiana. Vast fields of corn, often a mile in extent, stretched away into tall, green forests — the fences were in good repair, and the houses large, with numerous out-buildings. In no portion of the South had I seen more magnificent plantations. Here the work of canvassing began in earnest, and the march of the colored troops was that of an army of liberation. The first plantation to which we came belonged to a man named Ferrebee. Fourteen slaves were found in the negro quarters. Would they
eld through showers of bullets, personally directing the movements of the troops. General Banks's staff ably assisted him, freely sharing the danger with their chief, and behaving throughout the action with the greatest gallantry. General Franklin and staff were in the hottest of the fire. Of the soldiers who so bravely fought the battle and achieved a splendid victory, it need only be said, that the men of Maine, Missouri, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, New-York, Kentucky, Illinois, and Indiana, sustained their reputation, standing shoulder to shoulder with the loyal Louisiana troops; and well may their States be proud to claim them as sons of their soil. The heroes of Vicksburgh and Port Hudson may now add the name of Pleasant Hill to the list of their glorious victories. The cavalry division, except a part of Colonel Lucas's brigade, was not in the action on Saturdry, the main body having been sent to convoy the wagon-trains to Grand Ecore. No part of the Thirteenth army