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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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Senator Lane then moved the appointment of a committee of seven to prepare an address to the women of America, and report a constitution for the proposed organization, which was unanimously adopted. The President appointed Mrs. Senator Lane, of Indiana; Mrs. Ann S. Stephens, New York; Mrs. Senator Wilson, Massachusetts; Mrs. Loan, of Missouri; Mrs. Pike, of Maine; Mrs. S. A. Douglas; Mrs. Ingersoll, of the district. Mrs. Spaulding, of Ohio, moved the appointment of a committee of five to nominate officers for the society. Adopted. Mrs. Spaulding, of Ohio; Mrs. Woodbridge, of Vermont; Mrs, Hughes, of Indiana; Mrs. Choate, of the district, and Mrs. Morris, of the navy, were appointed. The Committee on the Constitution reported the following: Articles of Association. article I:--of the name and object. Sec. 1. The name of this association shall be The ladies' National Covenant. Sec. 2. The object shall be to unite the women of the country in the earnest resolution
t seven hundred and fifty in the battle of the afternoon. The Twenty-third corps, which was moved around from the right, as a support for Hooker, lost slightly. About two o'clock the enemy, learning from prisoners taken from us, that Hovey's Indiana division of raw recruits held a position in the line, and smarting under their successive repulses on other portions of the line, hurled a heavy force upon Hovey, convinced that the recruits would run. Not so, however, The rebels held a strong punded in the hands and feet that they will be fit for duty in two or three weeks. The killed will amount to about eight hundred, among whom are many brave officers who have left behind them brilliant records. Ohio has lost her full proportion. Indiana, too, will mourn the loss of many of her brave sons. The enemy's losses are fully as large as ours, if not larger. In every assault upon our lines their loss was very heavy, and they were driven back, leaving hundreds of their killed and wou
iana Volunteers. Madison Grose, Lieutenant and Adjutant. Colonel Grose's letter. on battle-field, near Pittsburg landing, Tenn., April 11, 1862. dear friend: I wrote you yesterday and sent you a copy of my official report, and now send you a complete list of our killed, eight; missing, two; wounded, thirty-seven; total loss, forty-seven. Yet all of the wounded but twenty-five remain with us and are on duty. The twenty-five we have sent down the river, and hope they may get to Indiana; we got them on boats as soon as it was possible, for there they are well cared for, and cannot be else-where. Lieutenant Chambers and Sergeant Fentriss are both able and on duty, and ready for another contest, which I think we will have in a few days. I would like to give you many particulars if it were possible; taking my official report as the main basis, I will add, that as we landed our regiment on the south side of the river there were at least fifteen thousand of Grant's panic-st
rformed it highly satisfactory. Lieutenant-Colonel Carey, Thirty-sixth Indiana, brave to the last, received a severe wound during the battle on the nineteenth, and was succeeded by Major Trusler in command, who deserves a high meed of praise for continuing the good management of the regiment. Brave old regiment, your country will remember you when these trying times are over. Lieutenant-Colonel Foy and Twenty-third Kentucky, side by side with your comrades and brothers in arms from Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, you did your duty well. Colonel Higgins and Twenty-fourth Ohio can boast of as bravo and dutiful officers and men as can be found in any army. Captain George M. Graves, my Assistant Adjutant-General, a brave and good officer, fell by my side mortally wounded on the nineteenth, while Tendering efficient service. He has since died. Rest in peace, brave soldier. Isaac Bigelow and George Shirk, two of my orderlies, were wounded on the twentieth, the latter seriously, and who
and completely that he did not delay our march twenty minutes, and this only to pick up prisoners and burn his five wagons, including his headquarter wagons, out of which we got all the brigade and other official papers. We had but a few hours previously captured, with its guard of three men, a small mail bound for Tuscaloosa. About fifty or seventy-five conscripts from both sides of the Tennessee river, that Russel was hustling off to Tuscaloosa, were released by our attack; also eight Indiana soldiers, captured by Russel near Decatur. We then continued our march unmolested, by way of Mount Hope, towards Leighton; but learning, when within ten miles of that place, that all our troops had returned to Decatur, we came on by easy marches to the same post, reaching it on Friday evening, sixth instant. The whole distance marched, from the time of leaving Decatur, nine days previously, was two hundred and sixty-five; and about four hundred miles, from the time of leaving Chattano
and completely that he did not delay our march twenty minutes, and this only to pick up prisoners and burn his five wagons, including his headquarter wagons, out of which we got all the brigade and other official papers. We had but a few hours previously captured, with its guard of three men, a small mail bound for Tuscaloosa. About fifty or seventy-five conscripts from both sides of the Tennessee river, that Russel was hustling off to Tuscaloosa, were released by our attack; also eight Indiana soldiers, captured by Russel near Decatur. We then continued our march unmolested, by way of Mount Hope, towards Leighton; but learning, when within ten miles of that place, that all our troops had returned to Decatur, we came on by easy marches to the same post, reaching it on Friday evening, sixth instant. The whole distance marched, from the time of leaving Decatur, nine days previously, was two hundred and sixty-five; and about four hundred miles, from the time of leaving Chattano
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
ver line below Onondaga battery, the key of the position, and about eight miles in length; a very difficult line to defend against an enterprising enemy, acquainted with every by-path, and guided by owners of the soil. His responsibilities were of the highest order, and the labors of his troops were incessant. Under his vigilant supervision everything was done that could be for the security of the right flank, and the enemy was foiled in all plans for crossing. Colonel R. S. Foster, of Indiana, commanding brigade and portion of the front, added fresh laurels to the high reputation which he established in West Virginia and the Peninsula. He was at home in grand skirmishes, and the enemy always recoiled before him. General Gordon reported three days before the conclusion of the siege, and was assigned to the command of the reserve division. His long and varied experience rendered his judgment of great value, and I regret that he has been called to another field. My thanks a
d the Union. This hope is long deferred, I fear. March eighteenth, I wrote, viz.: A few weeks since I advised you of the return of a man sent out by General Wessels to procure information concerning the ram at Halifax. He was on a train that carried some twenty-five thousand pounds of iron from Wilmington to Halifax. Yesterday several refugees came in from Wilmington.. One of them had been in the Coleraine Foundry, at Wilmington, since the commencement of the war. He is from Indiana. He says several shipments of iron have been made to Halifax and Kinston for the gunboats, and confirms the report made to General Wessels. Some of the iron has been made near Atlanta, where the Confederates have extensive works. March twenty-ninth, I wrote, viz.: My spy came in from Kinston last evening, having been out seven days. He says the two iron-clads are to act in conjunction, and when the enemy is ready he will be attacked. The water has risen in the river, and the iron
d the Union. This hope is long deferred, I fear. March eighteenth, I wrote, viz.: A few weeks since I advised you of the return of a man sent out by General Wessels to procure information concerning the ram at Halifax. He was on a train that carried some twenty-five thousand pounds of iron from Wilmington to Halifax. Yesterday several refugees came in from Wilmington.. One of them had been in the Coleraine Foundry, at Wilmington, since the commencement of the war. He is from Indiana. He says several shipments of iron have been made to Halifax and Kinston for the gunboats, and confirms the report made to General Wessels. Some of the iron has been made near Atlanta, where the Confederates have extensive works. March twenty-ninth, I wrote, viz.: My spy came in from Kinston last evening, having been out seven days. He says the two iron-clads are to act in conjunction, and when the enemy is ready he will be attacked. The water has risen in the river, and the iron
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. General Rousseau's expedition. (search)
thus enabled to pursue his course through the enemy's country with a more definite knowledge of the route ,the enemy's forces and movements, etc., than could have been obtained from an elaborate system of scouts and spies. The complete success of the expedition and the directness of all its movements indicates the sagacity and judgment with which it was planned and executed. General Rousseau is a Kentuckian by birth, but when a young man, entering the profession of law, he emigrated to Indiana, where he was engaged in the practice of law when the Mexican war broke out. He raised a company of volunteers, became its captain, and served with distinguished gallantry during that war. He afterwards returned to Louisville, and was a member of the Kentucky Senate at the time of the outbreak of the rebellion. He opposed the policy of neutrality, and, resigning his seat in the Senate, devoted his energies to the raising of troops for the support of the Government. In June, 1861, he was c
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