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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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would refer to those States for a proof of this. When the fourth article of the Constitution was adopted, the greater number of the contracting parties held slaves. The hostility of the Northern States to the institution of slavery had led them to disregard their constitutional obligations. The laws of the General Government have ceased to effect the objects of the Constitution. Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connection, Rhode Island, New York. Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin and Iowa have enacted laws either nullifying the Constitution or to render useless all attempts to execute the acts of Congress. In many of these States fugitives "held to service and to labor" have been claimed, but in none of them has the State Government complied with the stipulation on this subject made in the Constitution. The ends for which this Government was instituted have been defeated, and the Government itself made destructive by the action of the no
still more terrible judgments; but that He will carry us through this crisis in such a manner as shall forever check the spirit of anarchy, bring peace to a distracted people, and preserve, strengthen and perpetuate our national Union. The Indiana papers publish the official denial of the Secretary of the State of Indiana, that her Legislature has ever passed any laws having a tendency to prevent the full and complete execution of the Federal Fugitive Slave Law within her borders. SoState of Indiana, that her Legislature has ever passed any laws having a tendency to prevent the full and complete execution of the Federal Fugitive Slave Law within her borders. South Carolina Legislature. The following is the composition of the South Carolina House of Delegates: In publishing the lists of the members of the Legislature, they give the post-office and occupation of the member, and in the classification one is styled a farmer and another a planter. The first is he that raises grain — it may be almost entirely — in distinction from the cotton or rice planter. The several occupations of the 123 members of the House of Representatives are classed as