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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

seed in demand — sale of condemned horses. Washington, Jan. 14. --Numerous applications are made to the Commissioner of Patents for cotton seed. It is his intention to procure a quantity of such seed as he believes will succeed in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois for distribution in small quantities. One hundred and twenty-five condemned Government horses were sold at auction to day, bringing from one dollar to ninety-eight dollars, or an average of twenty-eight dollars each. Is is sn G. Davis has fled the State, says he is in Rockville attending to his business, and adds that if the editor of the Journal dare repeat the charges made against Mr. Davis "he will be the best cowhided man that ever received such a punishment in Indiana, " which it thinks will be convincing proof even to the editor of the Journal that Mr. Davis is at home. Accident on the western Railroad. Troy, Jan. 14. --This forenoon, as the Troy and Boston train was about twenty miles above th
eron had scarcely reached us, before news is born to us of the resignation of other member of the Cabinet at Washington. It is now reported that Welles, Secretary of the Navy, and Smith, Secretary of the Interior, have followed the example of Cameron and throws their commissions. In other words, ill. Cameron, being fully convinced that the ship must sink, they have gathered up as much of her treasure as possible, and forsaken her. Their places will be filled it is said, by Mr. Colfax, of Indiana, and Mr. Holt, of Kentucky The report which reached us that Humphrey Marshall had cut up the Yankees is corf corroborated by intelligence from the North.-- Our informant states, that notwithstanding their newspaper accounts of a great vicar, over Gen. Marshall, that in Baltimore the fact is known that such was not the case, hu that as usual the Yankees were defeated with a very heavy loss. We further learn that five regiments we sent out to attack Gen. Price. Their obj was to