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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Iowa (Iowa, United States) or search for Iowa (Iowa, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 47 results in 11 document sections:

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th has very peculiar interests to preserve, interests already violently assailed and boldly threatened. Your Committee are fully persuaded that this protection to her best interests will be afforded by the Annexation of Texas; an equipoise of influence in the halls of Congress will be secured, which will furnish us a permanent guarantee of protection. Mr. Henry A. Wise, of Virginia, of the same political school with Gilmer, in a speech in the House, January 26, 1842, said: True, if Iowa be added on the one side, Florida will be added on the other. But there the equation must stop. Let one more Northern State be admitted, and the equilibrium is gone — gone forever. The balance of interests is gone — the safeguard of American property — of the American Constitution — of the American Union, vanished into thin air. This must be the inevitable result, unless, by a treaty with Mexico, the South can add more weight to her end of the lever. Let the South stop at the Sabine, whil
known in a still more solemn form, by giving the Executive approval required by the Constitution to the bill for the organization of the Territorial Government of Iowa, which prohibited the introduction of Slavery into that Territory. The XXXth Congress assembled December 6th, 1847, when Robert C. Winthrop (Whig), of Massachu officers as may be necessary to administer such laws, etc., etc. This passed the Senate by 29 Yeas Including only Messrs. Dickinson of New York, A. C. Dodge of Iowa, Douglas of Illinois, Fitzgerald of Michigan, and Hannegan of Indiana (all Democrats), from Free States. to 27 Nays; but the bill being thus returned to the House,ition: Yeas 82; Nays 114--every member from the Slave States, with four PENNSYLVANIA.--Charles J. Ingersoll--1. Illinois.--Stephen A. Douglas, Robert Smith--2. Iowa.--S. C. Hastings--1. In all, 4. Democrats from Free States, voting in the affirmative; while every Whig from the Free States, with every Democrat from those State
itorial organization of the region westward of Missouri and Iowa; but no action was had thereon until the next session, whenposition as the Senator from Texas now is. The Senator from Iowa [Mr. A. C. Dodge] knows it; and it was for reasons I will nlaced me here may be assured. Mr. Augustus C. Dodge, of Iowa, submitted Dec. 14, 1853. to the Senate a bill to organiacing (as before) the region lying westward of Missouri and Iowa, which was referred to the Committee on Territories; from won the north, and from the western boundary of Missouri and Iowa on the east to the crests of the Rocky Mountains on the wesuglas and Shields, of Illinois; Dodge (A. C.) and Jones, of Iowa; Walker, of Wisconsin; Hunter and Mason, of Virginia; Prattither slowly and toil-somely, by a circuitous route through Iowa and Nebraska; but who, on entering Kansas, were met by a Fe six New England States, and Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa--giving Gen. Fremont 114 electoral votes. Mr. Buchanan car
guns. When the sun rose next morning, the Missourians had decamped. Capt. Brown left soon after for the East by the circuitous land route through Nebraska and Iowa; that through Missouri being closed against Free-State men. He took a fugitive slave in his wagon, and saw him safely on his way to freedom. He made two or three is Battle of the spurs, by Kagi, with forty mounted men from Topeka, of whom seventeen escorted him safely to Nebraska City. He there crossed the Mississippi into Iowa, and traveled slowly through that State, Illinois, and Michigan, to Detroit, where he arrived on the 12th of March, crossing immediately into Canada, where his twed failed. The reason given for this, by one A certain Col. Hugh Forbes, an English adventurer, and general dabbler in civil discord, who had been with Brown in Iowa, if not in Kansas, afterward figured as a revealer of his secrets, or what were alleged to be such. He had been disappointed in his pecuniary expectations. who wa
ed by 1,481, though Fremont had 16,623; while Gov. Lowe, in Iowa, had but 2,151, where Fremont had received 7,784; and Gov. nti-Lecompton Democrat in another district; while Michigan, Iowa, and Wisconsin, chose Republican tickets — as of late had bs from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota, decidedly hostile to the Administration; ane the above resolve was under consideration, Mr. Harlan, of Iowa, moved to add to it as follows: But the free discussionof Michigan, Doolittle, of Wisconsin, Grimes and Harlan, of Iowa--21.--every Democratic Senator present but Mr. Pugh, of Ohihich, as finally modified, was presented by Mr. Samuels, of Iowa, in the following shape: 1. Resolved, That we, the Demo, 23; Indiana, 13; Illinois, 11 ; Michigan, ; Wisconsin, 5; Iowa, 4; Minnesota, 2 1/2; California, 4--198. The question , 23; Indiana, 13; Illinois, 11; Michigan, 6; Wisconsin, 5; Iowa, 4; Minnesota, 4--165. Nays--Massachusetts, 6; New Jerse
h of the several contributing parties.2,801 Pennsylvania 268,030 Fusion vote apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.78,871 Fusion vote apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.100,000 12,776 Ohio 231,610 187,232 11,405 12,194 Indiana 139,033 115,509 12,295 5,306 Illinois 172,161 160,215 2,404 4,913 Michigan 88,480 65,057 805 405 Wisconsin 86,110 65,021 888 161 Minnesota 22,069 11,920 748 62 Iowa 70,409 55,111 1,048 1,748 California 39,173 38,516 34,334 6,817 Oregon 5,270 3,951 5,006 183   Total Free States 1,831,180 1,128,049 279,211 130,151 Slave states. States. Lincoln. Douglas. Breckinridge. Bell. Delaware 3,815 1,023 7,337 3,864 Maryland 2,294 5,966 42,482 41,760 Virginia 1,929 16,290 74,323 74,681 North Carolina (no ticket) 2,701 48,539 44,990 South Carolina [Chosen by the Legislature.] Georgia (no ticket) 11,590 51,889 42,886 Alabama (no ticket) 13,651 48,83
The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island. Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania ; and all new States annexed and admitted into the Union or formed or erected within the jurisdiction of said States, or by the junction of two or more of the same or of parts thereof, or out of territory acquired north of said States, shall constitute one section, to be known as the North. The States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas, and all new States annexed or admitted into the Union, or erected within the jurisdiction of any of said States, or by the junction of two or more of the same, or of parts thereof, or out of territory now held or hereafter acquired north of latitude 36° 30′ and east of the crest of the Rocky Mountains, shall constitute another section, to be known as the West. The States of Oregon and California, and ceive the wisdom of dividing a legislature into two houses--once compared s
llows: Ays--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts. New York, New Hampshirefollowing vote: Ays--Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, vote: Ays--Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire,see, Virginia-12. Noes-Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire. Vermont--land, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia-15. Noes--Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, New-Hampshire--4. Mr Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Kansas-16. Noes-Iowa, Maine,Massachusetts, North Carolina, Virginia-ssee, Kansas-11. Noes--Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Hampand, Tennessee, Kansas-12. Noes-Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Missouri, North Carolina, Vermont, Virgia--10. Noes-Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania--7. Mr.e, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas. They have approved what is herewith[4 more...]
all was for regiments of infantry or riflemen only — each regiment to be composed of 780 men — the apportionment of regiments to the several States called on being as follows: Maine 1 New Hampshire 1 Vermont 1 Massachusetts 2 Rhode Island 1 Connecticut 1 New York 17 New Jersey 4 Pennsylvania 16 Delaware 1 Tennessee 2 Maryland 4 Virginia 3 North Carolina 2 Kentucky 4 Arkansas 1 Missouri 4 Ohio 13 Indiana 6 Illinois 6 Michigan 1 Iowa 1 Minnesota 1 Wisconsin 1 The 94 regiments thus called for would form a total of 73,391 men — the residue of the 75,000 being expected from the Federal District. I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate, and aid, this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and existence, of our national Union, and the perpetuity of popular Government, and to redress wrongs already long enough endured. I deem it proper to say that the first service assigned to the forces hereby ca<
word capital, which was adopted by. Yeas 121; Nays--Messrs. Burnett and Reid--(Rebels:) when the remainder was likewise adopted: Yeas 117; Nays--Messrs. Potter, of Wis., and Riddle, of Ohio--(Republicans.) Mr. Burnett declined to vote. It is worthy of record that on this sad day, while Washington, crowded with fugitives from the routed Union Grand Army, seemed to he at the mercy of the Rebels, Congress legislated calmly and patiently throughout; and the House, on motion of Mr. Vandever, of Iowa, unanimously Resolved, That the maintenance of the Constitution, the preservation of the Union, and the enforcement of the laws, are sacred trusts which must be executed; that no disaster shall discourage us from the most ample performance of this high duty; and that we pledge to the country and the world the employment of every resource, national and individual, for the suppression, overthrow, and punishment of Rebels in arms. Mr. Andrew Johnson, of Tenn., on the 24th, moved in the S
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