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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Iowa (Iowa, United States) or search for Iowa (Iowa, United States) in all documents.

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utile defence of the right of secession, they present the Personal Liberty Laws of some of the Northern States as a justification; concerning which they say: We assert that fourteen of the States have deliberately refused for years past to fulfil their constitutional obligations, and we refer to their own statutes for the proof. * * * The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa have enacted laws which either nullify the acts of Congress, or render useless any attempt to execute them. In many of these States the fugitive is discharged from the service or labor claimed, and in none of them has the State Government complied with the stipulation made in the Constitution. The State of New Jersey, at an early day, passed a law in conformity with her constitutional obligations; but the current of anti-slavery feeling has led her more recently to enact laws which render i
-the inevitable consequence of which will be, not only that those States will lose a much larger number of slaves than heretofore, but that in a few years slavery will disappear from them altogether. The truth is, there is but one safety for the slave interests of the border States, and that is in having friendly neighbors on the north of them, and not only friendly neighbors, but friendly, stringent, coercive, penal legislation. With Pennsylvania, and Ohio, and Indiana, and Illinois, and Iowa, made enemies of — as enemies, and bitter enemies, secession will surely make them — no human power can prevent the extinction of slavery in the States of Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri. Fire will not more effectually reduce the fagot to cinders, or water extinguish flame, than secession will bring slavery in those States to annihilation. To bring the matter home, if with a stringent fugitive slave law, executed (as I think) with all reasonable fidelity and success, and with f
and six o'clock in the morning. In the very beginning of the action Lieut.-Col. Callahan, who commanded a company of cavalry, retired with his company across the river, and it is said that this gallant officer, who claims to be a graduate of West Point, never stopped until he reached Montrose on the Mississippi River. Through the country over which he and a few of his comrades passed, they spread the report that the Unionists were cut all to pieces, and the secessionists were advancing into Iowa. The consequence was that the wildest panic seized the people — some flew to arms and some to the bush. A portion of Moore's infantry were also seized with the panic, and fled across the river, but seeing their companions standing firm, many of them afterward returned and took part in the fight. The portion of Moore's men which remained amounted to only about 300, yet they stood firm as regulars, and delivered their fire with the coolness of veterans. After all sorts of a fight, regul
the air, and called successfully upon his men to follow him. Every captain and lieutenant did his duty nobly, and when they were recalled and replaced by the fresh Iowa and Kansas troops, many were the faces covered with powder, and dripping with blood. Capt. Gratz, gallantly urging his men forward against tremendous odds, fell mrthy of especial notice. Among the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been confined for several day less able to pursue than we imagine. A considerable amount of powder has just been destroyed by the ordnance officer, because of no means of transportation. The Iowa regiment have also burned a portion of their baggage. On one or two occasions the enemy raised Union flags and cheered, causing us to fear we were firing upon Col
the air, and called successfully upon his men to follow him. Every captain and lieutenant did his duty nobly, and when they were recalled and replaced by the fresh Iowa and Kansas troops, many were the faces covered with powder, and dripping with blood. Capt. Gratz, gallantly urging his men forward against tremendous odds, fell mrthy of especial notice. Among the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and Capt. Wright of the Home Guards. Col. Bates, of the Iowa First, who had been confined for several day less able to pursue than we imagine. A considerable amount of powder has just been destroyed by the ordnance officer, because of no means of transportation. The Iowa regiment have also burned a portion of their baggage. On one or two occasions the enemy raised Union flags and cheered, causing us to fear we were firing upon Col