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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Iowa (Iowa, United States) or search for Iowa (Iowa, United States) in all documents.

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ey saw the guns bidding them defiance, and not fully aware of the Iowa boys with their five-shooting rifles being in such close proximity, they swooped down on a furious charge to capture the pieces. The rebel right was under command of General Richardson, the left of General George. Lieutenant Reed stood by his guns manfully, and handled them admirably. When the rebs had got within easy range, the boys poured out their rapid fire from along the railroad track; the rebs pressed forward, but Iowa was too much for them; but three succeeded in reaching our line--one of them was General George. Just as he reached the line, his horse was killed, and in a moment he was in the grasp of a Yank, a prisoner; one of the others was wounded, and the other killed. After fighting for some time, the rebels were repulsed, and commenced a hasty retreat. The following are the casualties to the Second Iowa at that place: Frank Byland, company L; Charles F. Brown, company I, killed on the field; and
ounded, and thirteen prisoners. The enemy's loss was much heavier than ours. February sixth, marched into Jackson. The Iowa brigade cross Pearl River, and take the advance. March of five miles. February seventh, messengers from Big Black came, and twelve wounded and taken prisoners. February thirteenth, marched thirteen miles, and packed our extra teams. The Iowa brigade remain four days with the transportation, guarding it, and skirmishing with the enemy; then marched on the eighteegs, privates of the Thirteenth Iowa, both murdered after being captured, as narrated above. February twenty-fourth, the Iowa brigade marched twenty-three miles in eight hours and a half, to Pearl River, to guard pioneers in building bridges over tl of Mississippi which in its day was a very pretty place, but before we left, it was almost a mass of smoking ruins. The Iowa brigade being sent in advance to guard the pioneer corps while constructing a pontoon across Pearl River, we entered the t