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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Iowa (Iowa, United States) or search for Iowa (Iowa, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
lina, 29 from Tennessee, 28 from Louisiana, 28 from Mississippi, 26 from Alabama, 24 from South Carolina, 17 from Texas, 14 from Georgia, 5 from Virginia, 4 from Florida, 2 from Arkansas, 2 from Kentucky, 2 from Missouri, 2 from California, 1 from Iowa, 1 from New Mexico, 1 from Ohio. They were distributed in the four classes as follows: Seniors 84, Juniors 102, Sophomores 125, Freshmen 80. Of the eight young men who received the first distinction in the Senior class, four are in the grave, orth Carolina University Magazine, 1887-91, and from other miscellaneous sources, chiefly correspondence: Total number of Confederate dead, 312. by place of residence at time of matriculation in the University. Arkansas,1 California,1 Iowa,1 Missouri,1 Texas,4 South Carolina,5 Georgia,7 Virginia,8 Florida,9 Mississippi,11 Tennessee,11 Louisiana,14 Alabama,18 North Carolina,221 By occupation : Editors,2 Civil Engineers,5 Preachers,8 Merchants,8 Physicians,1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.56 (search)
picuous figure. Made many telling speeches in his day. A frequent visitor to the field of honor. When the death of the venerable ex-Senator George W. Jones, of Iowa, was announced recently, the misstatement went with it that ex-Senator Bradbury, of Maine, was the only living member of the senatorial group that was in office previous to the outbreak of the rebellion. This was a curious mistake, in view of the fact that ex-Senator Harlan, of Iowa, is very much alive, that he was not only prominent as a senator and a member of the first Cabinet of Lincoln, but also that he was an eager candidate for the nomination for Governor of Iowa last year, and thatIowa last year, and that only a short time before the death of Jones he had made a stirring speech to the old soldiers on Memorial Day. Less curious, perhaps, yet still remarkable, was the fact that almost no commentator upon the death of Jones and the ante-war senatorial group remembered that the last of the Southern Senators to leave the Senate on a