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fugitive slave Burns, and succeeded in quashing the indictments on which they were arraigned. The following year, he successfully defended the British consul at Boston against a charge of violating the neutrality laws of the United States during the Crimean War. In 1856, cooperating with counsel from Ohio, he made a noted application to Judge Curtis, of the United-States Supreme Court, for a writ of habeas corpus, to test the authority by which the Free-State prisoners were held confined in Kansas by Federal officers. More lately, in 1859, he initiated and directed the measures to procure suitable counsel for the defence of John Brown in Virginia; and, in 1860, was counsel for Hyatt and Sanborn, witnesses summoned before Senator Mason's committee of investigation into the John-Brown affair. Upon his argument, the latter was discharged by the Supreme Court of Massachusetts from the custody of the United-States marshal, by whose deputy he had been arrested under a warrant issued at th
yet to find some night and day of uninterrupted quiet and repose of mind and limbs, when I may yield myself to friendship and philosophy under the shadow of its groves. On the 21st of June, a meeting was held in Faneuil Hall, to consider the question of the re-organization of the Rebel States, at which Theophilus Parsons, Professor in Cambridge Law School, presided; and speeches were made by Mr. Parsons, Richard H. Dana, Jr., Henry Ward Beecher, S. C. Pomeroy, United States Senator from Kansas, and George B. Loring, of Salem. Letters were also read from Governor Andrew, Alexander H. Bullock of Worcester, Charles G. Loring, Alexander H. Rice and Samuel Hooper of Boston, and Benjamin F. Butler of Lowell. The letter of Governor Andrew, which contained the views he then entertained, and which he adhered to during the remainder of his life, upon a subject of such engrossing interest and importance, cannot fail to be read with interest at this and in all succeeding time. We therefo