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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of General John Bankhead Magruder. (search)
ilitary display. His princely hospitality and the brilliant show-drills with which he entained his visitors made Fort Adams one of the most attractive features of the most celebrated watering place in America. It was, however, not until some years later, when I came under his command, that I learned to appreciate the chivalric character and admire the military ability of Colonel Magruder. This was at Fort Leavenworth, in the fall of 1858, after the suppression of the political troubles in Kansas. The assemblage of a considerable number of artillery companies at Fort Leavenworth suggested the establishment of a light artillery school at that place, on the plan of the school that had been created at Old Point. On this suggestion the Leavenworth school was established in the spring of 1859. Colonel Dimick, by virtue of his rank, became superintendent of this school. He was an officer remarkable for purity and integrity of character; through a long experience his valor and his piet
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States a proper book to use in our schools? (search)
y. Thus, by an unfair and disingenuous statement, the reader is taught that the Supreme Court deliberately destroyed what the author had elsewhere, (p. 190) described as not a mere act of Congress which could be repealed, * * * but a solemn compact between the inhabitants of the Territory * * * and the people of the thirteen States. The next sentences (p. 268) contain the only allusion to John Brown in the text, and are as follows: The excitement became greater when John Brown, formerly of Kansas, actually invaded the State of Virginia with a party of about twenty men, for the purpose of liberating slaves. He gained possession of the arsenal at Harper's Ferry, thinking to arm the negroes, whom he expected to join him. He was easily captured—his party being either killed or dispersed—and was tried, convicted, and put to death under the laws of Virginia. Invaded the State of Virginia is good! We hear nothing, however, of Booth and his accomplices invading Washington, and attacking
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
is entirely one sided and partisan-telling of outrages committed by the pro-slavery party, aided by Missourians, and saying not one word about the Emigrant Aid Societies of the North--the eloquent appeals of Mr. Beecher to send Sharp's Rifles to Kansas instead of Bibles-or the outrages committed by the Abolition party of Kansas. 2. The friends of the book think that it (p. 268) tells the truth when it says that John Brown had no support in his raid, and that therefore the rage of resentment Kansas. 2. The friends of the book think that it (p. 268) tells the truth when it says that John Brown had no support in his raid, and that therefore the rage of resentment through the South was uncalled for. We would advise them to read up on this question, and they will find that in the Senate of Massachusetts a motion to adjourn on the day of John Brown's execution in respect to his memory was lost by only three votes—that town bells were tolled, funeral sermons preached, and eulogies pronounced all over the North—that John Brown at once took his place in the pantheon of Abolition saints—and that the resentment of the South was justly aroused, not against this m<