hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 5: operations along Bull Run. (search)
to winter quarters, leaving my brigade on the right of our line, which was now contracted so as to merely cover McLean's Ford on that flank. About the middle of January, 1862, Major General Van Dorn was relieved from duty with the Army of the Potomac and ordered to the Trans-Mississippi Department, General Bonham succeeding to the command of the division as senior brigadier general. On the 30th of January, General Beauregard took leave of the Army of the Potomac, he having been ordered to Kentucky; and after this time there was no distinction of corps in the Army of the Potomac, but all division commanders reported directly to General Johnston. After the 1st of February General Bonham relinquished the command of the division, having resigned his commission to take his seat in Congress, and I succeeded to the command of the division as next in rank --Colonel Kershaw, who was appointed brigadier general, succeeding Bonham in the command of his brigade. My brigade had gone into tem
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 16: battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam. (search)
llan's, or Banks', might well be believed, but that the Major General commanding the Grand army of the Potomac, should have so estimated the strength of General Lee's army at Sharpsburg, is perfectly amazing. Who commanded the forty-six regiments not included in above, or where were the 400 guns to come from? This estimate of the relative strength of the two armies gives rise to some very curious reflections: It must be recollected that Bragg and Kirby Smith were at this time in Kentucky, moving north, and if the newly established Government at Richmond had been able to put in the field and send into Maryland from the comparatively small population of the Confederacy an army of nearly 100,000 men with 400 pieces of artillery, it showed a wonderful energy on the part of that government; while, the fact that the powerful Government at Washington, with its immense resources and its very large population to draw from, after a call for 300,000 more men, and after taking everythi
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 35: battles of Cold Harbor. (search)
st, and the Potomac, in the East, with the mountains of Western Virginia, rendered it impossible for an invading army to march into the enemy's country, except at one or two fords of the Potomac, just east of the Blue Ridge, and two or three fords above Harper's Ferry. The possession of the seas, and the blockade of our ports, as well as the possession of the Mississippi, the Ohio, and Potomac Rivers, with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and the railroads through Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee, enabled the enemy to transport troops, from the most remote points, with more ease and rapidity than they could be transported over the railroads under the control of the Confederate Government, all of which were in bad condition. The enemy, therefore, in fact, had all the advantages of interior lines; that is, rapidity of communication and concentration, with the advantage, also, of unrestricted communication with all the world, which his naval power gave him.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Appendix: the testimony of letters. (search)
eral Early knows more of Confederate history than any man now living, probably for the reason that he has never moved out of the Confederacy --but I know you did not like some haversack anecdotes which were entirely to your credit, and which endeared you to thousands of our people. You were so fortunate, or unfortunate, as to be considered the wittiest man in the army and doubtless many clever and witty things were put upon you in consequence. Heaven bless you always! D. H. Hill. Kentucky Military Institute, Farmdale, Ky. General J. A. early: Captain Sam Gaines went to the reunion at Gettysburg some years ago and while standing at the point taken by you (Hays' and Hoke's brigades on Cemetery Heights) he says a Federal officer, who was also in the battle, told him that your charge was more serious than you or our people seemed to be aware of,--that you really had passed in rear of Meade's headquarters and that Meade and his staff would certainly have been your prisoners ha
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
y, 114, 158, 475 Kearney, General (U. S. A.), 49, 131 Kearneysville, 163, 383, 409 Keller, Captain, 407 Kelley's Ford, 192, 307, 316 Kelly, General (U. S. A.), 75, 338, 404, 461 Kemper, General J. L., 5, 16, 17, 19, 21-25, 28 Kentucky, 52, 157 Kentucky Military Institute, 477 Kernstown, 240-42, 368, 398-99, 408, 426, 475 Kershaw, General, 27-28, 33, 41, 52, 54, 57, 59, 81, 82, 139, 407-09, 411- 413, 433-35, 437, 441-49, 452, 454 Kettle Run, 115, 304-06 Kettle Run Kentucky Military Institute, 477 Kernstown, 240-42, 368, 398-99, 408, 426, 475 Kershaw, General, 27-28, 33, 41, 52, 54, 57, 59, 81, 82, 139, 407-09, 411- 413, 433-35, 437, 441-49, 452, 454 Kettle Run, 115, 304-06 Kettle Run Bridge, 305 Keyes, General (U. S. A.), 132 Kilmer, G. L., 476 Kilpatrick (U. S. A.), 340 King, General (U. S. A.), 74, 122 King, Lieutenant Colonel, 381, 388, 414, 423-25, 427, 460 Kirkland, General, 353 Knights of the Golden Circle, 353 Lacy's Springs, 326, 457 Lamar, Colonel, 153, 180, 388 Lancaster, 261 Lane's Brigade, 171, 173, 199, 274, 355-56 Langhorne, Colonel D. A., 2, 3 Langster's Cross-Roads, 47, 50 Latimer, Captain J. W., 176, 179, 186, 199, 200