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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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to what was then known as the Green River country, in the southwestern part of Kentucky. There my father engaged in tobacco — planting and raising blooded horses, ofved at maturity excepting one daughter. My elder brother, Joseph, remained in Kentucky when the rest of the family removed, and studied law at Hopkinsville in the oflled The wilderness --by the country of the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations — to Kentucky, and was placed in a Catholic institution then known as St. Thomas, in Washingho had gone down the river in flat-boats walked back through the wilderness to Kentucky, Ohio, and elsewhere. We passed many of these, daily, on the road. Therdians, who were allies of the British. The party with which I was sent to Kentucky consisted of Major Hinds (who had command of the famous battalion of Mississip with some supplies, besides bed and blankets for camping out. The journey to Kentucky occupied several weeks. When we reached Nashville we went to the Hermitag
that mother, in whom there was so much for me to admire and nothing to remember save good. Charles B. Green, a young Mississippian, who was studying law in Kentucky, had acted as my guardian when I was at school there, and he returned with me to Mississippi. We left Bardstown to go home by steamer from Louisville; for, thenity in which he lived. His admonitions to his children were rather suggestive than dictatorial. I remember a case in point, which happened after my return from Kentucky, while I was at the County Academy. A task had been assigned me in excess of my power to memorize. I stated the case to the teacher, but he persisted in imome and went daily from my father's house to the school-house until I was sufficiently advanced to be sent to the college known as the Transylvania University of Kentucky. At the head of the County Academy was a scholarly man named John A. Shaw, from Boston. He took on himself, also, the duty of preaching every Sunday; but as
eferred to remain, and thus continued for four years, the time allotted to the course. When graduated, as is the custom at West Point, we were made brevet second lieutenants, and I was assigned to the infantry, and, with others of the same class, ordered to report to the School of Practice at Jefferson Barracks, near St. Louis, Mo. When I entered the United States Military Academy at West Point that truly great and good man, Albert Sidney Johnston, had preceded me from Transylvania, Ky.; an incident which formed a link between us, and inaugurated a friendship which grew as years rolled by, strengthened by after associations in the army, and which remains to me yet, a memory of one of the greatest and best characters I have ever known. His particular friend was Leonidas Polk, and when Johnston was adjutant of the corps Polk was the sergeant-major. They were my seniors in the Academy; but we belonged to the same set, a name well understood by those who have been ground in t
e college at Baton Rouge, and is now President of the Tulane University of New Orleans. Everywhere his course has been marked by all the qualities that the friends of his illustrious father could have desired or expected to see developed in him. Descended from one of the greatest and purest men of his day, he was named after his uncle, William Preston, and if there is virtue in a name none could confer more honor or a better earnest of a noble life than that of General William Preston, of Kentucky. Whenever Lieutenant Davis remained long enough to be known by the settlers, they thoroughly liked him, and he adapted himself to their way of life with a kindliness and ready sympathy which they appreciated heartily. Their peculiarities were many in number, but their high qualities, their generosity, courage, industry, and good faith, inspired him with sincere respect. With characteristic modesty he used to praise them for the great diversity of things they could accomplish and which
was obscure, it was thought prudent to remove them from the Cherokee to the Creek Nation, and Lieutenant Davis was detailed to superintend the change. He gave the following account of his service in a letter written in 1878: From Hon. Jefferson Davis to George W. Jones. In the beginning of 1833 I was one of the two officers selected from the First Infantry for promotion into the newly created regiment of dragoons, and left Prairie du Chien under orders for recruiting service in Kentucky. As soon as the Kentucky company was raised I returned to Jefferson Barracks, the rendezvous of the regiment. The first field officer who joined was Major Mason, he being the other officer who, with me, was selected from the First Infantry for promotion in the dragoons, and by him I was appointed adjutant of the squadron, composed of the first companies which reported. After other companies had joined, the colonel, Henry Dodge, came and assumed command. He had known me when I served on
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 15: resignation from the army.-marriage to Miss Taylor.-Cuban visit.-winter in Washington.-President van Buren.-return to Brierfield, 1837. (search)
s to be married to Lieutenant Davis. In reference to this reported elopement Mr. Davis wrote: In 1835 I resigned from the army, and Miss Taylor being then in Kentucky with her aunt — the oldest sister of General Taylor--I went thither and we were married in the house of her aunt, in the presence of General Taylor's two sistersrespect of the foremost men in the national capital. He was my guest when I seconded Jonathan Cilley, of Maine, in the great duel with William J. Graves, of Kentucky, in which Cilley was killed. On one occasion, that winter, Davis and I accompanied Dr. Linn, the Senator from Missouri, and Senator Allen, of Ohio, to a reception given by the Secretary of War. Dr. Linn and I returned home, leaving Senator Allen and Davis to return with John J. Crittenden, of Kentucky, at Crittenden's request. After Dr. Linn and I got to bed, we heard the voice of Allen at a distance. He and Davis soon entered our room. Mr. Davis was bleeding profusely from a
red everything with a provoking kind of assured triumph that was so hard to bear because there was so little which could be disputed in the facts arrayed. But when Mr. Clay confronted him, it was Worth ten years of peaceful life, One glance at their array. Their policy, their ideas, their education, their method of oratory, their moral standards, everything differed. Each hated the other with the most unaffected bitterness. Mr. Benton's mailed glove lay always before the Senator from Kentucky; and not infrequently, when Mr. Benton had finished a noble argument, studded all over with darts of satire or vague reference to the past, that stung and clung to Mr. Clay until he was trembling with fury, he would sit down with a fine air of having been void of offence and in charity with all men. Mr. Clay, who was a very impressive man, but not of the leonine character like his opponent, would rear his tall form, turn his blazing eyes on the Speaker, and begin with all amenities of
which the negroes stand toward us. The time for Mr. Davis's return rolled around all too soon. To replace Tartar, he took Richard, a noble bay with black points, and sailed again for Mexico. He met, en route, Colonel Thomas Crittenden, of Kentucky, afterward a general in the Federal Army, whose account of Buena Vista will be given here, and, by taking turns with each other, one sitting up while the other slept, they avoided assassination, and reached Saltillo, safely, January 4, 1847. and any regiment he might select. Our regiment was the favored one, and our little remnant of an army retraced its footsteps and returned to Monterey. General Wool had been left in command of the Northern Department, and with some regiments of Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, and Arkansas volunteers, was encamped near where the battle of Buena Vista was afterward fought. In passing, I will state that these untried volunteers, together with the meagre force that returned from Victoria with General
t sufficiently important to justify that disruption of society . . . which would result from bringing out men of that high class which the honorable Senator from Kentucky has correctly said constitute the great body of the volunteers. Following his argument, Mr. Davis touched upon a question which, later, was to receive, on botny States are interested. The States, he argued, were prohibited from entering into such a work. If the Government could not do it, it was plain that neither Kentucky nor Indiana could make the improvement. He held that it was as clearly the right of the general Government to repair the dam, under the provision in the Constitplied. After this, curiously enough — with one single exception — the discussion was participated in by men of the same mind. That exception was Crittenden, of Kentucky, who had insisted on the old Whig idea of centralized power. He was in favor of the largest latitude to be given to Government aid for improvements of this clas
the States before the formation of the Constitution; it needed no guarantee within their limits; its recognition beyond this was part of the more perfect Union; as its protection against all enemies whomsoever is part of the common defence for which that Constitution was adopted. There is not a more prominent feature in the Federal compact than the prohibition of the States to interfere with commerce. But if a citizen of Maryland cannot pass through Pennsylvania or Ohio, on his way to Kentucky or Missouri, without submitting his property to the test of those States through which he is merely travelling, the right of free commerce among the States has no practical value. The right to uninterrupted transit is not varied by the character of the property — the power is the same, whether the question arise upon a slave or a bale of goods. There is no discretionary power, and a total prohibition would be less offensive than an insidious distinction, claiming to spring from a moral su
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