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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
val of these reinforcements would give us a grand army at Tullahoma. With this Army General Johnston might speedily crush Rosecranz, and that he should then turn his force toward the north, and with his splendid army march through Tennessee and Kentucky, and threaten the invasion of Ohio. My idea was, that in the march through those States the army would meet no organized obstruction; would be supplied with provisions, and even reinforcements, by those friendly to our cause, and would inevitab accomplish the same result, and I replied that I did not see that it would, because this movement would be too hazardous, and the campaign in thoroughly Union States would require more time and greater preparation than one through Tennessee and Kentucky. I soon discovered that he had determined that he would make some forward movement, and I finally assented that the Pennsylvania campaign might be brought to a successful issue if he could make it offensive in strategy, but defensive in tactics
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Advance sheets of Reminiscences of secession, war, and reconstruction, by Lieutenant-General Richard Taylor. (search)
these Johnston was appointed. Subsequently, a brigadier by brevet, he commanded the expedition against the Mormons in Utah. Thus he brought to the Southern cause a civil and military experience far surpassing that of any other leader. Born in Kentucky, descended from an honorable colonial race, connected by marriage with influential families in the West, where his life had been passed, he was peculiarly fitted to command Western armies. With him at the helm, there would have been no Vicksburt and gained the confidence of cultivated gentlemen and rugged frontiersmen. Besides, he had passed through the furnace of ignorant newspapers, hotter than that of the Babylonian tyrant. Commanding some raw, unequipped forces at Bowling Green, Kentucky, the accustomed American exaggeration represented him as at the head of a vast army, prepared and eager for conquest. Before time was given him to organize and train his men, the absurdly constructed works on his left flank were captured. At F
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appeal of the Lee Monument Association. (search)
of Alabama; A. H. Garland, L. C. Gause, Jordan E. Cravens, T. M. Gunter, W. F. Slemons, of Arkansas; Charles W. Jones, R. H. M. Davidson, of Florida; J. B. Gordon, Benj. H. Hill, Alexander H. Stephens, Julian Hartridge, W. H. Felton, James H. Blount, Philip Cook, H. P. Bell, H. R. Harris, M. A. Candler, W. E. Smith, of Georgia; J. Proctor Knott, Albert S. Willis, J. E. S. Blackburn, Thomas Turner, J. G. Carlisle, John W. Caldwell, A. R. Boone, J. A. McKenzie, M. J. Durham, J. B. Clarke, of Kentucky; J. B. Eustis, E. John Ellis, E. W. Robertson, J. B. Elam, R. L. Gibson, of Louisiana; L. Q. C. Lamar, 0. R. Singleton, Van H. Manning, James R. Chalmers, H. D. Money, H. L. Muldrow, Charles E. Hooker, of Mississippi; F. M. Cockrell, D. M. Armstrong, T. T. Crittenden, A. H. Buckner, Benj. J. Franklin, R. P. Bland, R. H. Hatcher, John B. Clarke, Jr., David Rea, J. M. Glover, C. H. Morgan, of Missouri; M. W. Ransom, A. S. Merrimon, A. M. Waddell, A. M. Scales, Joseph J. Davis, Robert B. Vanc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
has been duly appointed gene-ral agent of our Society and authorized to travel in our interest, to collect money or material for us, to appoint local agents, or to act for us as occasion may demand. We deemed ourselves fortunate in securing the services of this gallant soldier and accomplished gentleman, and the result has fully justified our expectations. He has been canvassing Nashville with the most gratifying success, and now proposes to visit other cities and towns of Tennessee and Kentucky. We bespeak for him the hearty co-operation of all friends of the cause of truth. Annals of the army of Tennessee is the title of a new monthly which it is proposed to start in April at Nashville, Tenn. We have received the circular and prospectus from the editor, Dr. E. L. Drake, and shall cordially welcome the new worker in the cause of historic truth, and bid it a hearty God speed. The circular is signed by a number of gallant soldiers of the Western army, and contains a number
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Murfreesboro. (search)
(horse shot); Captain Semple, ordnance officer; Lieutenant Darragh, severely wounded. Captains Martin and Coleman, of my volunteer staff, were active and efficient. The former had his horse killed under him. 217 Drs. Heustis and Pendleton, Chief Surgeon and Medical Inspector, were unremitting in attention to the wounded. Dr. Stanhope Breckinridge, Assistant Surgeon, accompanied my headquarters, and pursued his duties through the fire of Wednesday. Mr. Buckner and Mr. Zantzinger, of Kentucky, attached themselves to me for the oocasion and were active and zealous. Captain Blackburn, commanding my escort, ever cool and vigilant, rendered essential service, and made several bold reconnoisances. Charles Choutard of the escort, acting as my orderly on Wednesday, displayed much gallantry and intelligence. The army retired before daybreak on the morning of the 4th of January. My division, moving on the Manchester road, was the rear of Hardee's corps. The Ninth Kentucky, For