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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 8 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
capture of Fort Beauregard. prisoners turned over to General T. W. Sherman. naval battles contrasted. Sherman's legions. Dupont's eminence as a Commander. attempts to despoil Dupont of his honors. Dupont's high commendation of his officers. General Sherman's headquarters securely established at Hilton Head. Tatnall escapes. Colonel Gilmore's reconnoissance. results of the loss of the Norfolk Navy Yard. Owing to the increase of the Confederate forces in the States of Tennessee, Kentucky and Missouri, it became necessary to fit out armed vessels on the Western rivers. In May, 1861, Commander John Rodgers, U. S. N., was directed to report to the War Department, which in the early stages of the conflict practically assumed the control of the Western flotilla, although the vessels were under command of naval officers. Commander Rodgers proceeded at once to the West and purchased a number of river steamers, which were fitted and armed as gunboats; and this was the commencem
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
east Missouri, and on the 4th of September, 1861, he established his Headquarters at Cairo, Illinois. His district included Southern Illinois and so much of Western Kentucky and Tennessee as might fall into possession of the national forces. It comprised the junction of the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers, and was at the time the most important point of operations in the West. Kentucky, in the early part of the war, endeavored to preserve a neutral position between the contending sections. but the Confederate General Polk soon violated this neutrality, seizing Columbus, some twenty miles below Cairo, and threatening Paducah; whereu It was a part of the Confederate plan early in the civil war to seize and hold Missouri and Kansas, thus threatening the free States in the Northwest, to hold Kentucky and Tennessee, cross the Ohio, and make the Northern States the theatre of war, thus punishing the Northern people for their obstinacy in declining to yield to t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
Shortly after the battle of Belmont the Confederates established a strong line of operations reaching to the centre of Kentucky. On their left was Columbus, where they had collected a strong force and 140 guns. One of their largest armies was at ads (the northernmost point then held by the Confederates west of the Alleghany Mountains). These armies threatened Northern Kentucky and protected Nashville and Middle Tennessee. At the centre of this strategic line the Tennessee and Cumberland f the cotton States. These two streams approach within twelve miles of each other, at a point near the boundary between Kentucky and Tennessee. Here, at a bend in each river, the Confederates had erected two batteries, Fort Henry, on the Tennessee,bidding any advance of the Union gun-boats or transports, prevented the transportation of our army by water, either into Kentucky or Tennessee. The reader may think it strange that the Confederates, with nothing like the Federal resources, should
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
use on the following day in the actions which resulted in their defeat and the surrender of 16.000 men, sixty-five guns and 17,600 small-arms to General Grant. (Twenty-five hundred of the Confederates were killed and wounded during the siege.) This victory belonged exclusively to General Grant and no one can take from him one iota of the credit of that great military feat, in which he showed his fitness to lead the armies of the Union. The results of this victory were that the whole of Kentucky and Tennessee at once fell into the hands of the national forces — the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers were opened to national vessels for hundreds of miles. Nashville, the capital of Tennessee and a place of great strategic importance, fell. Bowling Green had become untenable as soon as Donelson was attacked, and was abandoned on the 14th of February, the day before the Confederate works on the Cumberland were carried, while Columbus and the other end of the strategic line were evacuated
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
s. At the battle of Bull Run they were as well supplied with all the appliances of war as were the government troops, who were forced to retreat on that day before the fire of this first army of the insurgents. For some time all these matters had been considered by the southern leaders; and when the time came to act, eleven States rose as one man, and the government had not only to put down the State of South Carolina, with a small number of insurrectionists, but millions of people from Kentucky to Maryland, all armed and equipped and formed into battalions, as if they had been the great reserve of the nation, ready to jump to their arms at the call of the general government. This system of preparation extended to the Navy as well as to the Army. The Confederate leaders knew, two years before the war, what officers of the Navy would unite with them in humiliating the old flag, and though these officers made no pledges, and doubtless hoped that the event would never take place tha
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
ore it capitulated. The creation and organization of this huge squadron, which has done such effective service on the upper Mississippi and its tributaries, extending over a distance of more than 3,500 miles, may justly be considered among the most wonderful events of the times. It is but little over two years since we had not a naval vessel on all those waters, where we now have a squadron of 100 vessels, carrying 452 guns, with crews amounting, in the aggregate, to about 5,500 men. Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas, the upper portions of Mississippi and Louisiana, and the southern portions of those States which border on the Ohio River on the north, have been relieved and liberated through the instrumentality of the gun-boats, acting by themselves or in earnest and cordial co-operation with the armies. Rear-Admiral Porter has well sustained the renown which the gallant and lamented Foote so nobly earned, and has carried forward to successful results a larger and more powerfu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
ost expedition. Sherman was willing to listen to the Admiral, and the latter always gave that attention to Sherman's opinion which was due to his experience. It will strike any one at all conversant with military matters how absurdly the war at this time was conducted from Washington. Here was Grant, just successful in one of the most difficult sieges of modern times, with a great prestige, and supposed to command all the troops in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois and Ohio, yet it does not appear that his opinion in regard to the Red River expedition was ever asked. Grant had about that time gone to Chattanooga on a tour of inspection, and thought the Red River expedition of so little importance that he directed General Banks to send back A. J. Smith's command to Sherman after the 5th of May. General Grant was opposed to making any great effort to carry on the war west of the Mississippi, where it would take a large army and a large por
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
rations. Tennessee, lying adjacent to so many Southern States, was open to the raids of the Confederates, and they seemed loath to abandon it altogether, hoping still to obtain possession of it and carry the war into the more northern States of Kentucky, Ohio and Missouri. It was a vain hope, however, and one not justified by the position or condition of the Federal armies. In February, 1864, Lieutenant-Commander LeRoy Fitch still commanded a fleet of gun-boats on the Ohio, Tennessee and Cuth the exception of some trouble with the guerillas up the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, the operations for the year 1864 ended favorably for the Union cause, as far as the Navy was concerned. The Confederates continued to show themselves in Kentucky and Tennessee, however, and sometimes took advantage of transports that were not convoyed by gun-boats. Even as late as December, 1864, there was no diminution of zeal and energy on the part of the enemy, though they must have seen by that time