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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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ting in the Yorktown works, while Gen. Fitz-John Porter's division, from the right wing, is pouring through the gates and on beyond the fortresses, by the Williamsburgh river road. It is preceded by the McClellan dragoons and Sixth cavalry, with a large artillery force. It will not be surprising if we yet have a battle on the peninsula. It will surprise us if we do not make many prisoners, as the deserting stay-behinds report the enemy somewhat demoralized, and that many of the Irish and Kentucky soldiers have taken to the woods. One hundred thousand men have occupied the whole line opposed to us. Eight thousand staid at Yorktown alone until two o'clock this morning, then left post haste, spiking all the guns which they could not remove, and burying percussion torpedoes in the various approaches and gateways. I had scarce entered the fort second from the river when a frightful explosion took place, where a group of men were standing in the quadrangle. One of the New-York Thirty-
ash by desperate leaders, whose only safety lies in success. Such a foe ought never to conquer freemen battling upon their own soil. You will encounter him in your chosen position, strong by nature and improved by art — away from his main support and reliance — gun-boats and heavy batteries — and, for the first time in this war, with nearly equal numbers. The slight reverses we have met on the sea-board have worked us good as well as evil; the brave troops so long retained there have hastened to swell your numbers, while the gallant Van Dorn and invincible Price, with the ever-successful Army of the West, are now in your midst, with numbers almost equalling the Army of Shiloh. We have, then, but to strike and destroy, and as the enemy's whole resources are concentrated here, we shall not only redeem Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri at one blow, but open the portals of the whole North-west. Braxton Bragg, General Commanding Second Corps. G. C. Garner, Assist. Adjt.-Gene
s to the enemy in the eastern side of the region under my command. O. M. Mitchel, Major-General. General Negley's report. headquarters United States forces, Rogersville, Ala., May 14, 1862. Gen. O. Mitchel: sir: I have the honor to report the result of an expedition to this point. The command — consisting of the Seventy-ninth and a detachment of the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania volunteers, Lieut. Sypher's section of artillery from Standart's battery, Major Ousley's battalion of Kentucky, and Capt. Jennings's battalion of the Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry, formed the advance brigade, commanded by Col. H. A. Hambright, acting as Brigadier-General. The First Wisconsin, the Thirty-fifth Indiana, a detachment from the Thirty-eighth Indiana, a battalion of the Fifth Kentucky cavalry and a section of Standart's battery in command of Lieut. Bennett, formed the rear brigade, commanded by Col. Starkweather, of the First Wisconsin, acting as Brigadier-General--left Pulaski yesterday
the daring Kentuckians and brave Pennsylvanians, led on by such as Haggard and Wyncoop. Col. Hambright, who led the advance from Winchester to Jasper, and received the enemy's first fire, displayed great courage and coolness. Who will dare say that this foul rebellion will not be forever crushed, and our Union sustained, and come out of this fearful contest like gold tried in the fire, when such scenes as the above take place? Away out here, amid the mountain passes of the Cumberland, Kentucky and Pennsylvania shake hands, and with the love of the Union strengthening their every sinew, they rush on side by side, with drawn sabre, to bathe them alike in the blood of treason and cowardice. The effect of this skirmish was soon seen. As the retreating foe disappeared, the persecuted Union men of Marion began to appear. General Negley's despatch to Major-Gen. Mitchel says that hundreds of Union men have flocked into Jasper, and, with tears in their eyes, hail Mitchel and Negley a
vid scenes on the approaching morrow. At five A. M., to-day, we arise and visit the deck of the Benton, and find we are at anchor one and a half miles above the city of Memphis. It is mild and clear, with a bright sun, and every indication of fair weather. Memphis lays spread out before us on the bluffs in all her beauty — her large and elegant buildings, and graceful domes and steeples presenting an inviting and imposing appearance. The steamers H. R. W. Hill, New National, Victoria, Kentucky and Acacia are laying at the wharf. Our fleet of ironclads, ordnance and supply steamers and transports, being in full view of the city, the bluffs at this early hour appear to be thronged with citizens. Two fine large wharf-boats are also to be seen, together with the charred, burning, skeleton wreck of the tug Gordon Grant, lying on the Island opposite where we lay, which was burned by the vandals last night. The timbers, or shape of the hull, is there, together with the chimney and pr
h every body how to perform this duty; but it will be necessary to notify the military commander of the point watched, and the persons agreeing to watch it, so he may know when a proper person brings information. You need not fear making yourself any more liable to depredations by thus acting, for your all is gone if your soldiers are conquered. Every foot of ground in Mississippi should be disputed; every stump should form a rifle-rest, and canebrake a camp. You are not like Missouri, Kentucky and Maryland. No craven cowards have invited the vandals on to your soil; no regiments calling themselves Mississippians are marching with the Northmen-your brothers are not in their ranks. They are really and truly invaders, and should be met with resistance in every shape and manner, and death should meet them at every step. Let them see that this is your determination. Let them feel that their advance will be bloody, and their retreat bootless, and you will then be safe. Remove yo
uly 11-12, 1862. A correspondent of the Louisville Journal gives the following account of this affair: Lebanon, Ky., July 15. Now that things are somewhat quiet in and near Lebanon, I have concluded to give you a fair and impartial history of events that have transpired since the coming and going of the farfamed Acting Brig.-Gen. J. H. Morgan, C. S. A. On Friday, the eleventh, it was reported here about noon, that Gen. Morgan had attacked and routed the Federal forces in Southern Kentucky, and that he was making his way to Lexington through Lebanon. Shortly after a despatch of this character was received, it was currently and correctly reported that the General, with a large force, was about twenty miles south-west of Le banon, near the little village of Pinch 'em, and that he would take Lebanon on that (Friday) night. Lieut.-Colonel A. Y. Johnston, in command at this place, immediately sent runners to the Home Guards to hold themselves in readiness for any emergenc
It was now occupied by a regiment or two, with one battery, and some odds and ends of cavalry, the whole under the command of Ruggles. Upon the arrival of Gen. Breckinridge, he assumed chief command, and the troops were separated into two divisions. To Gen. Clarke were assigned Gen. Ben. Hardin Helm's brigade, consisting of the Fourth and Fifth Kentucky, Fourth Alabama battalions and Thirty-first Mississippi regiment, Col. Stratham's brigade of Tennessee and Mississippi troops, and Cobb's Kentucky and Hudson's Mississippi batteries. To Gen. Ruggles were given his old force, the Fourth Louisiana, Col. Allen; Louisiana battalion, Col. Boyd; the Partisan Rangers, and Semmes' battery, together with Preston's brigade, commanded by Colonel A. P. Thompson, of the Third Kentucky, composed of the Third, Sixth and Seventh Kentucky, and Twenty-sixth Alabama regiments. These troops were mostly war-worn veterans, but their long marches and the arduous picket-duty at Vicksburgh had nearly decima
orable engagement, from the pen of any one present, cannot be wholly without interest to the people of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky, and especially to those whose husbands, fathers, brothers and sons there offered up their lives in the defence of liber under the oppressions of the ruthless military despotism of Mr. Lincoln's administration, the people of this portion of Kentucky have at last been liberated by the conquering army of heroes under the command of Major-Gen. Kirby Smith. His advance hr hundreds of miles of mountainous and unproductive country, for the purpose of delivering their down-trodden friends in Kentucky from oppression. On Monday morning, Gen. Smith's advance — Churchill's division — entered and occupied the city, withrent. Upon the issue of the fight depended the possession of West-Tennessee, and perhaps even the fate of operations in Kentucky. The entire available force of the rebels in Mississippi, save a few garrisons and a small reserve, attacked you. They
count of the battles fought near Richmond, Ky., last Saturday, has not only been partially overshadowed by more important events in other parts of the country, but to some extent removed by the statements of officers and others, made public in various newspapers, who have preceded me from the field of battle. Still, a round, unvarnished tale of the events of that ever-memorable engagement, from the pen of any one present, cannot be wholly without interest to the people of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky, and especially to those whose husbands, fathers, brothers and sons there offered up their lives in the defence of liberty, religion, order and law. I therefore propose to write my version of the affair. It is impossible for any one man to see all of a general engagement between thousands of men. I did not see all of this one, but I did see a good deal of it. I propose to describe only so much of it as I witnessed, together with such information, obtained from sources believed to be perfec
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