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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,016 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 573 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 458 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 394 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 392 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 384 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 258 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 256 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 244 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) or search for Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 62 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.27 (search)
o raise a regiment, and had been in correspondence with parties in Kentucky who were recruiting men for the Southern service. Quite a number e pieces into regular companies, because those who had enlisted in Kentucky were naturally desirous of serving under the officers who had brouthers of joining Morgan, while a few declared they would return to Kentucky, rather than be consolidated with other companies. Colonel Trabued of our encampments in the far South, he would claim the whole of Kentucky as his own, and talk about how we raised fine stock, barley, hemp,ey were disposed to claim that each represented the garden spot of Kentucky. The Fourth was one of the best drilled regiments in the army. faces will soon be lying in forgotten graves. Anxious mothers in Kentucky to day, yearning countrymen at home waiting to hear from the promihis point, Governor George W. Johnson, our Provisional Governor of Kentucky, joined Company E, and shouldered a musket. He was killed the nex
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official statement of the strength of the Federal armies during the war. (search)
628,171366,107265,517 Delaware13,93512,2841,38613,67010,322 Maryland70,96546,6383,67850,31641,275 West Virginia34,46332,068 32,06827,714 Dist. of Columbia13,97316,53433816,87211,506 Ohio306,322313,1806,479319,659240,514 Indiana199,788196,363784197,147153,576 Illinois244,496259,09255259,147214,133 Michigan95,00787,3642,00889,37280,111 Wisconsin109,08091,3275,09796,42479,260 Minnesota26,32624,0201,03225,05219,693 Iowa79,52176,2426776,30968,630 Missouri122,496109,111 109,11186,530 Kentucky100,78275,7603,26579,02570,832 Kansas12,93120,149220,15118,706 Tennessee1,56031,092 31,09226,394 Arkansas7808,289 8,2897,836 North Carolina1,5603,156 3,1563,156 California 15,725 15,72515,725 Nevada 1,080 1,0801,080 Oregon 1,810 1,8101,773 Washington Territory 964 964964 Nebraska Territory 3,157 3,1572,175 Colorado Territory 4,903 4,9033,697 Dakota Territory 206 206206 New Mexico Territory 6,561 6,5614,432 Alabama 2,576 2,5761,611 Florida 1,290 1,2901,290 Lou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some reminiscences of the Second of April, 1865. (search)
runk took through the Southern States I am not able to describe. Suffice it to say, through the kind offices of my young friend Hannibal Hewitt, then in the employment of the Adams Express Company, it was reclaimed, and safely restored to me in Kentucky about four or five months after I had it placed in the baggage wagon of the Secretary of War at Richmond, and long after he had reached a foreign country. I must not forget to dispose of my valuable traveling-bag. I clung to it until I reachedstocratic species of baggage, to-wit — a black enameled-cloth carpet-sack, to which I held fast until I reached home on the 19th of June. You see I had determined to visit Washington, D. C., and thence, if not hindered, to proceed to my home in Kentucky; and it did not seem to be becoming in an ex-member of the Confederate Congress to be lugging among the elite of the Northern States, through some of which I expected to pass, a pair of rusty old saddle-bags. It would have been a reflection upo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign of General E. Kirby Smith in Kentucky, in 1862. (search)
Campaign of General E. Kirby Smith in Kentucky, in 1862. by Paul F. Hammond. Prefatory Note.--This narrative was writtpropose to write a history of the Confederate campaign in Kentucky, but to give a true and faithful narrative of those eventit was the largest portion,) which General Smith led into Kentucky, but the causes which produced them and the objects soughackers, native born white men of East Tennessee and Southeastern Kentucky, as savage and relentless, and nearly as ignorant, itary authorities at Knoxville. He was now on his way to Kentucky--still on foot. We met him a few days afterwards at Barbdistance, Heth, cavalry and all. A little way over the Kentucky line the road leads through a broad, shallow, and very clFor some little time we had seen a number of men, in blue Kentucky jeans, the common dress of the people, moving to and fro enever the opportunity offered; and when we returned from Kentucky they were more hostile than ever. Inalienably wedded to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky in 1862. (search)
Our cavalry under Col. Scott, which entered Kentucky by the Jamestown road, captured London two daThe command of General Smith, at this time in Kentucky, consisted of Cleburne's and Churchill's divifield; or to advance boldly into the heart of Kentucky. Even a simultaneous assault in front and recross the mountains. Lastly, to advance into Kentucky was a bold and hazardous movement, but less ht was known that he had but few old troops in Kentucky, and his raw levies were counted as nothing iore he was well aware that we had crossed the Kentucky line. General Bragg, who had begun his advanhad now marched nearly one hundred miles into Kentucky, and met not one man who sympathised with theur front the blue-grass region, the garden of Kentucky, teeming with inexhaustable supplies. Generecalls one occasion, the battle of Richmond, Kentucky, he thinks, when the prince with the permissi duty. He, too, gained his General's rank in Kentucky, or, very soon after, and following General S[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. (search)
Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. by Major Paul F. Hammond.--paper no. 3. The next day--Sunday--. Thus did we often find families divided in Kentucky. We were now barely eight miles from Lexin which succeeds the rugged mountains of south-east Kentucky, and stretches from the foot of Big Hilfederate forces to occupy and redeem the State of Kentucky. Mr. John Clay replied, that he had justcommand, he boldly advanced into the heart of Kentucky by difficult roads, through a hostile populatis chief depot, Lexington, the second city in Kentucky, and the metropolis of the most populous and his doing, the overthrow of Buell's army, and Kentucky is secured — Grant must evacuate North Missisknown. Marshall was believed to have entered Kentucky by the Pound Gap route, but no accurate infor an excellent moral effect upon the people of Kentucky. But the positions of Bragg and Buell being to be decided in what manner the Union men in Kentucky, who had persecuted those who sympathised wit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
st assaults of its powers, with the certainty of being overwhelmed in the first shock of arms, and while they were ready to make common cause with the seceding States, the uncertainty of the action of the middle States--North Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee--rendered it impossible to concert any action with those on the Gulf until the intervening States had taken their position. At the same time large portions of the people were unable to appreciate the presence of the crisis, and stieces as have embalmed his reputation as a trickster among the most distinguished that history records. In a letter to Governor Pratt, he declined at that time to convene the legislature, because he was in correspondence with the governors of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and North Carolina, as to the best means of preserving the rights of the South, and at the same time most solemnly asseverated his entire devotion to the South, calling God to witness that he would be first to shoulder his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
dell, Major C. S. Stringfellow, and Rev. Dr. J. William Jones, of Richmond; Colonel Walter H. Taylor and Captain Theo. S. Garnett, of Norfolk; Colonel Thomas H. Carter, of King William county, Va.; Colonel R. E. Withers, of Wytheville; Colonel William Preston Johnston, of Baton Rouge,La.; Colonel R. H. Dulaney, of Loudoun county, Va.; General Eppa Hunton and General William H. Payne, of Warrenton, Va.; and General G. W. C. Lee, of Lexington, Va. Vice-Presidents of States--General I. R. Trimble, Maryland; Governor Z. B. Vance, of North Carolina; General M. C. Butler, of South Carolina; General A H. Colquitt, of Georgia; General E. W. Pettus, of Alabama; Colonel W. Call, of Florida; General Wm. T. Martin, of Mississippi; Rev. B. M. Palmer, D. D., of Louisiana; Colonel T. M. Jack, of Texas; Hon. A. H. Garland, of Arkansas; Governor Isham G. Harris, of Tennessee; General J. S. Marmaduke, of Missouri; General Wm. Preston, of Kentucky; and W. W. Corcoran, Esq., of District of Columbia.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. (search)
General Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. No. 4. by Major Paul F. Hammond. It is not withoutter to assist the former in his movement into Kentucky; but General Smith had a fine army of his own due the credit of planning the campaign into Kentucky it might be difficult to determine, and it isf little consequence to inquire. But when in Kentucky it became necessary for the two armies to be in the stirring events about to transpire in Kentucky. From Mount Sterling, Heth was sent back tnot characterize the subsequent operations in Kentucky. But perhaps the most lamentable consequencem of the security of the Confederate cause in Kentucky. To believe this was a strange infatuation, inaugurated Mr. Hawes Provisional Governor of Kentucky. This idle pageant was not imposing in ceremter there was no escaping. These people in Kentucky were very much worse off than those on the soever to overcome their prejudices; and should Kentucky ultimately come with the South, great dissati[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Hood's Tennessee campaign. (search)
tunity was given for engaging Sherman's forces in detail. It was then resolved to move Hood's army into Tennessee and destroy Thomas and then take possession of Kentucky and threaten Ohio. The conception was a bold one. Its execution involved leaving a large Federal army in Georgia, which could march unobstructed to the sea, e left behind, and every man remaining was a veteran. Then the long and sad experience of retreating was now reversed, and we were going to redeem Tennessee and Kentucky, and the morale of the army was excellent. We hoped to cut off a large body of Federals at Pulaski, but by a forced march they got into Columbia just in time picture. So, if we had captured Schofield, as could easily have been done at a trifling loss, we would have taken Nashville without a battle and pushed on into Kentucky, and, while I do not claim that it would have changed the result, yet it would certainly have prolonged the war and thrown an uncertain factor into the great pro
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