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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 974 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 442 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 288 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 246 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 216 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 192 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 166 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 146 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 144 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) or search for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
nd compelled the destruction of the Virginia, her record stirred the Confederates to almost superhuman efforts. Secretary Mallory was most active in founding enterprises both at home and abroad for the construction of vessels. Stephen Russell Mallory, secretary of the Confederate states navy The beginning of the Confederate navy--ruins of the Norfolk navy-yard, 1862 and its dearth of even the nucleus of any naval force. The secession of Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana in quick succession made for a sure commencement of hostilities. In February, 1861, delegates from the seceding States met at Montgomery, Alabama, and organized a new provisional Government; the breach had widened beyond all hope of repair; the only manner in which the matter could be settled was by war. Jefferson Davis was made the President of the new republic, and the task he had to face might well have appalled a less resourceful brain. Without a treasury, without an army, and wit
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
aining the odds arrayed against them. Had the two powerful ironclads, the Mississippi and the Louisiana, been finished and in commission, declared the Confederates, Farragut's fleet would never haveong to the army were under the orders of Commander John K. Mitchell, C. S. N. They were the Louisiana, sixteen guns, Commander Charles F. McIntosh; McRae, eight guns, Lieutenant Thomas B. Huger; Jly four vessels and twelve guns at his disposal, for the Jackson had gone up the river and the Louisiana was scarcely able to move. The River Defense Fleet proved a failure, for, as General Lovell hthis was the presence in the river of the two powerful iron-clad rams, the Mississippi and the Louisiana. Had it been known that the former was only about two-thirds completed, and that the LouisianaLouisiana, although her armament had been placed on board of her, was nothing more than a powerful floating battery with such insufficient motive-power that she was unable to leave her moorings, the fears of
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
not permitting his assumption of this duty, it was assigned to Admiral Porter. For the first attempt at the destruction of Fort Fisher there was used the most gigantic torpedo ever employed in warfare. This consisted of an old gunboat, the Louisiana, changed to resemble a blockade-runner and filled with powder. Much doubt as to the value of the experiment was entertained by experienced officers, but it was believed to be worth a trial. On the evening of December 23, 1864, she was towed i finally in Federal hands by noon of the 12th. General Maury evacuated the lines and retreated northward. As soon as all concerned learned that Lee and Johnston had surrendered, the Confederate forces throughout Alabama, Mississippi, and eastern Louisiana gave up their arms on May 4th. At the same time Commodore Farrand agreed to surrender his fleet to Admiral Thatcher, and the terms were carried out on the 10th, when the vessels were turned over to Fleet-Captain Simpson at Nanna Hubba Bluf
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
as troops under Col. Van Dorn. April 19, 1861. Ports of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas ordered blockaded by President Lincoln. April 20-21, 1861. Gosport Navy-Yard, Norfolk, Va., abandoneW. Pass of the Mississippi, with four to five thousand stands of arms. October 5, 1861. Two boats from U. S. S. Louisiana, Lieut. A. Murray, destroyed a Confed. schooner, being fitted out for a privateer, at Chincoteague Inlet, Va. Octob Three Confed. vessels were surprised and burnt at Chincoteague Inlet, Va., by a portion of the crew of U. S. gunboat Louisiana, under Lieut. A. Hopkins. October 29, 1861. Federal expedition sailed from Fort Monroe, under the command of Fl62. Forts St. Philip and Jackson, La., surrendered; Forts Livingston and Pike abandoned, and the Confed. ironclad Louisiana blown up. May, 1862. May 2, 1862. U. S. S. Brooklyn and several gunboats left New Orleans, ascending the Mis