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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 974 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 442 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 288 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 246 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 216 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 192 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 166 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 146 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 144 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) or search for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
was celebrated with great fervor by the people of Savannah, and public meetings held at various other places expressed a warm approval. The State convention, meeting two weeks later, by resolution sustained the governor in his energetic and patriotic conduct, and requested him to retain possession of the fort until the relations of Georgia and the Federal government should be determined. Having telegraphed advices of what he had done to the governors of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, Governor Brown soon had the satisfaction of receiving the endorsement of similar action on their part. On the day following the occupation of Fort Pulaski, the officers of the volunteer companies of Macon, Capts. R. A. Smith, E. Fitzgerald, T. M. Parker, L. M. Lamar, E. Smith and Lieut. W. H. Ross, telegraphed the governor, asking if he would sanction the movement of Georgia volunteers going to the aid of South Carolina; but this generous impulse was very properly checked, pending the
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
department of North Carolina, was with J. G. Walker's brigade. The splendid army with which Lee prepared to thwart the invasion of McClellan, probably the greatest assembled in behalf of the Confederacy during the war, included 186 regiments and battalions of infantry, among which Virginia as the invaded territory properly had 5th, the largest number. Georgia had 38; North Carolina, including the troops of her department, furnished 36; South Carolina, 15; Alabama, 15; Mississippi, 10; Louisiana, 11, and other States smaller numbers. Lee's plan to bring Stonewall Jackson to his assistance and crush McClellan before reinforcements could reach him, had approached the eve of its fulfillment, when about two hours before sunset on the 26th of June, Jackson's signal guns announced to A. P. Hill that he had reached the outposts on the Union right. But on the previous day, June 25th, occurred an aggressive movement of the enemy on the old battlefield of Seven Pines, which, though it d
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
0,but 18,000 men offered themselves for this service. The command of this force was conferred upon Howell Cobb, promoted to major-general with headquarters at Atlanta, and under him were Brig.-Gens. Alfred Iverson, Jr., with headquarters at Rome, and Henry R. Jackson at Savannah. Maj.-Gen. Gustavus W. Smith, who had resigned from the Confederate army, entered the service of the State with especial charge, at this time, of fortifications. At the close of the year 1863, according to the statement published by authority of the government at Richmond, Georgia had lost a greater number of soldiers than any other State of the Confederacy. The list as published is: Georgia, 9,504; Alabama, 8,987; North Carolina, 8,361; Texas, 6,377; Virginia, 5,943; Mississippi, 6,367; South Carolina, 4,511; Louisiana, 3,039; Tennessee, 2,849; Arkansas, 1,948; Florida, 1,119. During the fall of this year the fortification of Atlanta was begun, under the direction of Col. M. H. Wright, commanding.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
South Carolina cavalry, ten companies South Carolina reserves, and six South Carolina batteries. Although the year 1863 had closed in despondency, before the spring campaigns opened in Georgia and Virginia the hopes of the Southern people had been revived by a series of brilliant successes. Olustee, the first of these, has been described. Two days later Forrest gained a decisive victory in Mississippi, followed by one brilliant victory after another. Then came the defeat of Banks in Louisiana and of Steele in Arkansas, and the recovery of much lost territory. So when the armies in Virginia and Georgia stood up for battle in the early days of May, 1864, they entered upon their campaigns with the confidence of victory. The army of Tennessee fully believed that under Joseph E. Johnston they would recover all that had been lost, while the army of Northern Virginia had implicit confidence in Robert E. Lee. In each of these grand armies Georgia was well represented in the number
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
tooga valley before Sherman could intercept him, and the latter followed down to Gaylesville, Ala., where he remained about two weeks from the 19th, watching the Confederate army at Gadsden, and foraging from the rich country into which Hood had led him. On the 17th General Beauregard took command of the new military division of the West, east of the Mississippi, comprising Hood's department of Tennessee and Georgia, and Lieut.-Gen. Richard Taylor's department—Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana. By the last of the month, Hood had moved his army across Alabama to Tuscumbia, and Sherman, sending the corps of Stanley and Schofield and all the cavalry except Kilpatrick's division to Chattanooga to report to Thomas, who was given chief command of all Federal troops in Tennessee, moved his remaining three corps back to Kingston, whence he sent all the impedimenta back to Chattanooga, and prepared for the long march which he now contemplated. On the 11th of November he ordered Cor
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
Brigadier-General William R. Boggs was born in Georgia, was appointed to the United States military academy in 1849, and upon graduation four years later entered the army as brevet second lieutenant, topographical engineers. After serving on artillery duty at the academy in 1853, he was in the topographical bureau of the Pacific railroad surveys until transferred to the ordnance corps. He was made second lieutenant of ordnance in 1854, and first lieutenant in 1856. Being stationed in Louisiana and Texas, he participated in the combat with Cortina's Mexican marauders near Fort Broome, in December, 1859. When Georgia seceded from the Union he resigned his commission in the army of the United States, and was appointed captain, corps of engineers, C. S. A. His first service was at Charleston, S. C. Early in March, at the call of the governor of Georgia, Captain Boggs and Major Whiting were sent to Savannah, and General Beauregard, regretting the loss of these two most reliable and