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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 974 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 442 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 288 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 246 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 216 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 192 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 166 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 146 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 144 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) or search for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Army of Tennessee. (search)
ssure me. But, soldiers, I do not accept the honor done me to-day as personal to myself. I recognize in it a tribute to the memory of my beloved father, whom Louisiana always treated as a favored child. Louisiana was the State which gave him his military education and toward which his kindliest feelings always flowed forth. ALouisiana was the State which gave him his military education and toward which his kindliest feelings always flowed forth. And this city of New Orleans—Queen of the Southern Waters, the Venice of the West—was the city of all cities pre-eminently dear to his heart. Here he numbered many of his choicest friends. Here he was most cherished in life and most honored in death. I can never forget that New Orleans received his mortal remains into her bosom anities. This is not lost. It is not dead, and since lovers of freedom live North as well as South, it will not die, but will grow and strengthen until the end. Louisiana, here in this city of New Orleans, has evinced this by the combined wisdom and manhood with which she broke the fetters that an impartial tyranny had placed upon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
uded him on the previous night. In a day or two after this occurrence General Floyd's command was ordered to Cotton Mountain, probably a hundred miles distant. Floyd's command was now reinforced, and consisted of the following troops: Twenty-first Virginia regiment, Thirty-sixth Virginia regiment, Forty-fifth Virginia regiment, Fiftieth Virginia regiment, and Fifty-first Virginia regiment; the Thirteenth Georgia, Georgia battalion of cavalry, Twentieth Mississippi regiment, a company of Louisiana sharpshooters, Captain John H. Guy's artillery company, and Captains Jackson's and Adams's batteries, and a few cavalry companies. From Little Sewell to Cotton Mountain we had to march through a very rugged section of country, and were compelled to take a very circuitous route in order to reach this place. It was with great difficulty that we succeeded in conveying our cannon up and over some of the mountains we had to cross. Our horses being in such a weakened condition, we had to hitc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
October the order came, and the next morning Lieutenant Ritter and his men proceeded to the depot, and took the cars for Selma, having turned over the guns and horses to the quartermas-ter. From Selma to Montgomery, and thence to Atlanta, Georgia, where they arrived on the 23d. The next day they rejoined the battery at Decatur, Ga., having been absent from the old command over six months. The re-organization. The number of men in the battery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applied to the Secretary of War for seventy-five conscripts. While at Decatur the guns, horses and equipments of a four gun battery were received, and Dr. Thomas J. Rogers was assigned to the battery as surgeon. On the 29th of October, it was ordered to Sweet Water, East Tennessee, to rejoin Stevenson's division; whence, on the 5th of November, the whole division marched to reinforce General Bragg at Missionary Ridge. On the 12th, twenty-seven men
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
learly discloses. I have described to you the position which Shields had assumed at Lewiston, with his line stretching from the forest to the river. Behind him were a few more smooth and open fields; and then the wilderness closed in to the river, tangled and trackless, overlooking the position of the Federal line in height, and allowing but one narrow track to the rear. It was a true funnel— almost a cul de sac. These then, were Jackson's dispositions. General Richard Taylor, with his Louisiana brigade, accompanied by a battery of artillery, was to plunge into the woods by those tortuous tracks which I have mentioned, to creep through the labyrinths, avoiding all disturbance of the enemy, until he had passed clear beyond his left, was to enfilade his short and crowded line, was to find position for his battery on some commanding hillock at the edge of the copsewood, and was to control the narrow road which offered the only line of retreat. The Stonewall brigade was to amuse the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
undue egotism, be permitted briefly to refer to our antecedent history. The Washington Artillery is distinguished by being the oldest military organization in Louisiana, and the oldest perhaps in any of the Southern States. In the year 1840, the Washington Regiment, commanded by Colonel Persifer F. Smith, was the only militar At the expiration of that time the battery returned to New Orleans and was mustered out of service. In May, 1846, another requisition was made upon the State of Louisiana, now for a brigade of four regiments of infantry. The Washington regiment was the first to offer its services, and was the first in the field. The Washingnal street, in conformity to orders from headquarters, there to receive the reports and assume command of the following named companies: Washington Artillery, Louisiana Grays, Louisiana Guards, Chasseurs-a-Pied, Sarsfield Rifles, Orleans Cadets. You will report the command, when formed, to the Adjutant General for further ord
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
rviving officer, in their name—I salute you, Colonel Walton, in all soldierly and filial appreciation. Nine months had elapsed since the departure of the four companies, when the Confederacy, in an hour of supreme distress, called again upon Louisiana. Immediately from that same arsenal on Girod street a fifth company of the battalion sprang into the arena and was thrown to the front in Tennessee. It came armed cap-a-pie, nearly excelling its predecessors in thoroughness of equipment, of ied when the Tennessee is reached. The Fifth Company lost no men by straggling, yet on the banks of that river there stood in its ranks forty-five barefooted and half-clad men. Mobile is threatened and we go to her defence, joining again our Louisiana brigade. They were to capture the first enemy's battery met that the Washington Artillery may be refitted. In Spanish Fort we stood a siege for fourteen days in gallant style, and were the last to spike our guns that night of evacuation. R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
d bullet were falling thickest, General Beauregard and staff dashed down the line of battle, and reaching our position, halted and said, Colonel Walton, do you see the enemy? Yes. Then hold this position and the day is ours. Three cheers for Louisiana! The boys cheered heartily, and voice after voice caught up the cheer along the line. Thus, in the two engagements of July 18 and 21 the trial was met and successfully. And now came another trial, that of life in camp; sometimes more irksomeas the order of the day, and with his army badly beaten, old Ben Butler was bottled. In the west the guns of the Fifth Company were engaged at Cassville, Dallas, New Hope Church, Pine Mountain aad Kennesaw mountain. At the latter place fell Louisiana's lamented Bishop, General Leonidas Polk. And then in the east began the siege of Petersburg With scream of shot and burst of shell And bellowing of the mortars. In the west battles followed in quick succession. Peach Tree creek, sieg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
occasion, when in love, gratitude and reverence, you, of Louisiana, have asssembled to lay the corner-stone of our Confederach a sire. I may be permitted to say to the young men of Louisiana, who are before me to-day, as I said to my own son, when elder brothers, had moved to Rapides parish, in the State of Louisiana. His elder brother, Josiah Stoddard Johnston, had aress. During the winter passed with his elder brother in Louisiana he was dissuaded from his purpose to enter the navy and pther, Josiah S. Johnston, then a member of Congress, from Louisiana, a cadet in the United States Military Academy at West Poen as Leonidas Polk, of Tennessee, subsequently Bishop of Louisiana and a LieutenantGen-eral in the Confederate service, who dd but little to what has already been said. It was from Louisiana that Albert Sidney Johnston received his first commission in the army; and there is no State so appropriate as Louisiana, and no city so appropriate as New Orleans for a monument to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
but will grow and strengthen until the end. Louisiana, here in this city of New Orleans, has evincTwentieth Mississippi regiment, a company of Louisiana sharpshooters, Captain John H. Guy's artillettery had been much reduced by its losses in Louisiana and Mississippi, so that Captain Rowan applipositions. General Richard Taylor, with his Louisiana brigade, accompanied by a battery of artille6, another requisition was made upon the State of Louisiana, now for a brigade of four regiments of and we go to her defence, joining again our Louisiana brigade. They were to capture the first eneKennesaw mountain. At the latter place fell Louisiana's lamented Bishop, General Leonidas Polk. A may be permitted to say to the young men of Louisiana, who are before me to-day, as I said to my o the winter passed with his elder brother in Louisiana he was dissuaded from his purpose to enter tS. Johnston, then a member of Congress, from Louisiana, a cadet in the United States Military Acade[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
rmaduke may arrange for. Friends in Missouri, or Kentucky, or Arkansas, who desire to have General Lee's lecture, would do well to correspond at once with this office, or with General John S. Marmaduke, St. Louis, Mo. We are hoping for another successful tour with our gallant and accomplished friend, General Fitz. in our Acknowledgement of courtesies in our last number, we inadvertently omitted the name of J. F. Crosby, Vice-President and General Manager of the Texas and New Orleans and Louisiana Western Railways, whose cheerfully extended courtesy over his splendid Crescent Route was warmly appreciated. And we had purposed extending our very special thanks to our old friend Colonel J. G. James, President of the Texas Military College, who rendered invaluable aid in arranging the programme of General Lee's tour through Texas, and conducted a very extensive correspondence to make it a success. Recently we have been brought under obligations to W. W. Peabody, General Superintende
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