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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 974 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 442 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 288 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 246 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 216 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 192 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 166 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 146 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 144 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) or search for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of the Confederate flag. (search)
preserve that history from oblivion, some record should be made of it. The author of the new design adopted by the Confederate Congress was Major Arthur Lee Rogers. Confederate States Artillery, who, while disabled from active service in the field, devoted some of his leisure hours to improve the national emblem. After much attention to the subject and the laws of heraldry, Major Rogers, in January, 1865, submitted his design to Congress, and on the 13th of that month Mr. Semmes, of Louisiana, submitted the following bill in the Senate: A bill to establish The Flag of the Confederate States. The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact that the flag of the Confederate States shall be as follows: The width two-thirds of its length, with the union (now used as the battle flag) to be in width three-fifths of the width of the flag, and so proportioned as to leave the length of the field on the side of the union twice the width of the field below; is to have the groun
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate States Navy and a brief history of what became of it. [from the Richmond, Va. Times December 30, 1900.] (search)
tion in the Chattahoochie river. lady Davis—Iron tug, bought at Charleston, 1861, and mounted one gun. Her machinery was put in the Palmetto State and the vessel sold. Lapwing—Merchant bark, captured by the Florida, March 20, 1863, armed with two boat-howitzers and name changed to Oreto. She was set on fire and burned by her crew June 20, 1863. Livingston—Side-wheel river steamer, bought at New Orleans, 1861, and mounted six guns. Burned by Confederates in Yazoo river in 1863. Louisiana—Iron-clad, built at New Orleans, 1862, and mounted ten guns. She was set on fire by order of her commander and burned after the fall of New Orleans in 1862. McREA—Wooden propeller, bought at New Orleans, 1861, and mounted six guns. She was sunk by the Confederates after the fall of that city in 1862. Macon-Wooden propeller, ten guns, built at Savannah, taken to Augusta after the fall of that city and held until the war ended. Manassas—Iron-plated ram, built at New Orleans i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The case of the <rs>South</rs> against the <rs>North</rs>. [from New Orleans Picayune, December 30th, 1900.] (search)
rted the right of the States to interpose their authority in arrest of unwarranted action on the part of the Federal government. In regard to the acquisition of Louisiana, Alexander Johnston says: The Federalists felt, as Quincy expressed it afterwards, that this is not so much a question concerning sovereignty, as it is who shall the Federalists at the north desired to control that government in the interest of their own section. Mr. Jefferson, however, did not negotiate the purchase of Louisiana with a view to the extension of slavery, a consummation which he would not have regarded as desirable. He, in fact, had not contemplated the cession of the whole of the Louisiana territory; that proposal came from Napoleon himself. In regard to the general effect of the preponderant influence of the protected interests, Mr. Grady quotes the view presented by Mr. Benton in his Thirty Years in the United States Senate. Referring in general terms to the causes of southern discontent, Mr. B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of the history Committee of the Grand Camp C. V., Department of Virginia. (search)
ular notion is that the State-rights—secession or disunion doctrine—was originated by Calhoun, and was a South Carolina heresy. But that popular notion is wrong. According to the best information I have been able to acquire on the subject, the State-rights, or secession doctrine, was originated by Josiah Quincy, and was a Massachusetts heresy. This writer says Quincy first enunciated the doctrine in opposing the bill for the admission of what was then called the Orleans Territory (now Louisiana) in 1811, when he declared, that if the bill passed and that territory was admitted, the act would be subversive of the Union, and the several States would be freed from their federal bonds and obligations; and that, as it will be the right of all (the States), so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation, amicably if they can, violently if they must. Whilst this author may be right in characterizing the development of the doctrine, and fixing this right as a M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The natal day of General Robert Edward Lee (search)
ral tributes were sent for Miss Winnie Davis, the Daughter of the Confederacy; Major Lincoln, Commander Army of Northern Virginia Association; Major-General Gilmore, Commander Louisiana Division, U. D. C.; Mrs. Bentley, Mrs. Stamps and Miss Katharine Nobles, one of our charter members, who had done much towards organizing our Chapter. On April 6, Decoration day, a design was placed on the Confederate Monument at Greenwood, and the grave of Mumford, whose name is linked with the history of Louisiana, was not forgotten. In June a large floral offering was sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, where lie buried the remains of some 5,000 Confederates. All designs were ornamented with the Association ribbon. Mrs. Dickson, President of the Association, then read the following beautiful address, which was listened to with the deepest attention: Memory takes me back five years and shows me a few earnest, patriotic southern women forming this Chapter. To-day I see as a result of that movement
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
Crawley, wounded at Gettysburg; J. J. Cook, wounded at Gaines' Mill; Thomas Carter; W. J. Chappell, killed at Drewry's Bluff; J. H. Cook; Thomas Cumby; Joseph Covington; George Covington, wounded at New Berne, N. C.; Shanghai Coleman, orderly (Louisiana Tiger); —— ——Childress, fifer of company. E. B. Davis; Winslow Dennis; Patrick H. Deanor; James Dickerson, wounded at Gaines' Mill; Robert Davis; R. P. Davis; Temple Davis, killed at Gettysburg; Francis Dean; Joseph W. Dickerson; ——--—— Dougherty, killed at Five Forks (Louisiana Tiger). E. P. Evans; P. L. Evans; Thomas Elam. A. T. Faris; Peyton R. Ford, wounded in arm at Frayser's Farm; Albert Foster, killed in battle of ——; John Foster, orderly sergeant; P. W. Fore; John J. Foster; James Ford; Phil. Ford; Sam Foster; John J. Franklin; E. W. Fore. Walter L. Garden, wounded at Gaines' Mill; William E. Gaines; D. B. Garden; Thomas Garden; H. F. Gaines, killed in battle; Dr. John Garden; —— —— Guggenheimer.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.31 (search)
The battle at Fort Gregg. [from the New Orleans Picayune, April 1, 1900.] Louisiana survivors tell the story of the fight. As there has been some misunderstanding about the battle at Fort Gregg, in front of Petersburg, Va., and doubts as to what Louisiana troops were engaged therein, the matter has been elucidated by reference to a diary which was very carefully kept by a member of the Donaldsonville Artillery, who was one of the occupants of the fort and a participant in the battleLouisiana troops were engaged therein, the matter has been elucidated by reference to a diary which was very carefully kept by a member of the Donaldsonville Artillery, who was one of the occupants of the fort and a participant in the battle. That old veteran showed his diary to one of his comrades who was with him at the time, and the latter, with the data furnished him and the keen recollection which he has of the affair, has written the following statement of facts, which will interest all. In fact, it is a most valuable historical document: On April 2, 1864 (thirty-five years ago to-morrow), Fort Gregg, situated on a hill at an isolatated spot a little in the rear of the Confederate trenches, near Lee's dam (placed by our
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thomas R. R. Cobb. (search)
ted to wear the laurels of our victory. * * * Howell seized the Bible on which he swore the members, and says he intends to keep it. One man refused to kiss the Bible. It was Judge Withers, of South Carolina. He is an avowed infidel—one of the last of old Dr. Cooper's disciples. February 1.—On the night the Constitution was adopted and an election ordered for the next day at 12 o'clock, we had a counting of noses, and found that Alabama, Mississippi and Florida were in favor of Davis, Louisiana and Georgia for Howell, and South Carolina divided between Howell and Davis, with Memminger and Withers wavering. Howell immediately announced his wish that Davis should be unanimously elected. When the Georgia delegation met, Mr. Stephens moved to give Mr. Toombs a complimentary vote from Georgia. I suggested that four States were for Davis, and it would place Mr. Toombs in a false position. Toombs expressed his doubt that four States were for Davis, and preferred they should be canva
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A confederation of Southern Memorial Associations. (search)
ent originated with the Southern Memorial Association of Fayetteville, Ark. Mrs. J. D. Walker has this work in charge. A vote of thanks was given General V. Y. Cook, of Arkansas, Colonel Charles Coffin, of Arkansas, and Mr. Frank Lobrano, of Louisiana, for their noble efforts in securing the delegation an audience and having the memorial presented through General Gordon to the convention of United Confederate Veterans at the reunion of June 1, 1900, at Louisville, Ky. Adjourned to meet the, 64, 317 Lexington, Battle of, 155. Lincoln's Administration responsible, 186. Lodge, Henry Cabot, 180. Longstreet's Division at Gaines' Mill, 97. Loss, Unparallel, of Company F, 26th North Carolina, 199. Lodt Cause, The, 56. Louisiana, Purchase of. 162; Troops of, at Fort Gregg, 265. Lunt, George, 188. McCabe, Captain, W. Gordon, 212, 242. McClellan, General George B., 348. McGuire, M. D., LI. D., H. H., Sketch of life of, 267; his family, 275. McMartin, Colonel