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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 974 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 442 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 288 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 246 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 216 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 192 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 166 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 146 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 144 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) or search for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
s. Jefferson Davis. Celebrated by various organizations of Southern women at New Orleans, La., June 3, 1901, with the eloquent oration of Hon. Charles E. Fenner. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterday. Some weeks ago the loyal daughters of Louisiana undertook to make the day the occasion of a demonstration of love and devotion to the memory of Jefferson Davis, and a beautiful all-day celebration was planned, which for patriotism and loyalty has seldom been equaled in the South. The sun shone in all its brilliancy yesterday, out in the meadows the flowers were blooming, and over in Metairie cemetery, where for two years the remains of the South's great hero reposed, flowers placed by loving hands marked the spot henceforth sacred to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association Listens to a masterly oration by Judge Charles E. Fenner. (search)
ished citizens in every path of life, crowded up to the eloquent speaker as he closed and thanked him for his bold and true defense of the immortal principles of the Constitution. Judge Fenner spoke as follows: Jefferson Davis was born on the 3rd of June, 1808, in Christian (now Todd) county, Kentucky. He came of revolutionary stock. His father and two of his uncles rendered honorable service as soldiers in the revolutionary army. During his childhood his father removed first to Louisiana, and then to Wilkinson county, Mississippi. He received his primary education in the local schools, and then became a student at Transylvania University, in Lexington, Ky., where he studied until November, 1823, when, at the age of fifteen years, he was oppointed to West Point, where he was a contemporary, amongst others, of his life-long friends, Albert Sidney Johnston, Bishop Leonidas Polk and Alexander Dallas Bache. He graduated honorably in 1828; received his brevet as lieutenant o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Southern cross of honor presented to General J. A. Chalaron by the Daughters of the Confederacy. (search)
in with me in grateful remembrance. Many years ago, as the Confederate army, fresh from the bloody field of Shiloh, lay in and around Corinth, hourly expecting another great engagement with the federal masses under General Halleck, an address was issued by our Beauregard announcing that medals of honor for great distinction won in the coming battle awaited officers and men of his army. Every heart in our ranks was stirred by this announcement, and thousands of the youth and manhood of Louisiana and of her sister States, to whom it applied, vowed to themselves that the decoration should be theirs. Superior authority, however, revoked this noble order, and ever has there lingered in my heart regret that it did not prevail. The feelings and aspirations of those far-off moments were easily revived with me when the grand organization of Southern women to which you belong made public its intention of conferring on Confederate veterans a decoration commemorative of their services an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
inhabitants and held them as hostages to the end that they should be murdered in cold blood should any of his soldiers be killed by unknown persons, whom he designated as bushwackers. On the very day of the signing of the cartel for the exchange of prisoners between the Federal and Confederate authorities (July 22, 1862), the Federal Secretary of War, by order of Mr. Lincoln, issued an order to the military commanders in Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas, directing them to seize and use any property belonging to the inhabitants of the Confederacy, which might be necessary or convenient for their several commands, and no provision was made for any compensation to the owners of private property thus seized and appropriated. This order was such a flagrant violation of the rules of civilized warfare—those adopted by the Federal government itself, as hereinbefore quoted—that the Confederate government sought to prevent it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
n his loftiest and most captivating style: As a specimen of real oratory it has never been surpassed, not even by the fiery eloquence of Rienzi, when he stirred the hearts of the Romans to their utmost depths, or by the burning words of Demosthenes, when he moved the Athenians to cry out against Philip. There were other speakers on the occasion referred to, and among them were Gustavus A. Henry, the Eagle Orator of Tennessee, then a member of the Senate, and the silver-tongued Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, then Secretary of State. The circumstances under which the meeting was held and the fervid eloquence of the speakers made a profound impression, and those present with one heart and one voice resolved that there was no alternative left but to fight on to the bitter end. The end came within two months, when General Lee and the remnant of his gallant army having fought to the point of complete exhaustion, furled their banners and laid down their arms at Appomattox. John Goode.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dr. Samuel P. Moore. (search)
on and Susanna (Pearson) Moore, and was the lineal descendant of Dr. Mordecai Moore, who accompanied, as his physician, Lord Baltimore when he came to this country. By marriage and descent he was intimately connected with the families of Thomas Lloyd, the first Deputy Governor of Pennsylvania under William Penn, and in West Virginia with the Moore, Jackson, Lowndes, and Goff families. He had two brothers in the old United States army—Colonel West Moore, for many years Adjutant-General of Louisiana, and Dr. Charles Lloyd Moore, surgeon. In June, 1845, he married Mary Augusta Brown, one of the daughters of Major Jacob Brown, United States army, who was killed in the Mexican war in 1846, at the place on the Texas side of the Rio Grande, which has since been known, in honor of him, as Fort Brown, or Brownsville. General Stewart Van Vliet, United States army, married the only other daughter (and child) of Major Brown. Dr. Moore was educated in Charleston, S. C.; graduated in medic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ederal Secretary of War, by order of Mr. Lincoln, issued an order to the military commanders in Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas, directing them to seize and use any property belonging to the inhabitants of the Confederacy, which might be necessary or convenient for thesion referred to, and among them were Gustavus A. Henry, the Eagle Orator of Tennessee, then a member of the Senate, and the silver-tongued Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, then Secretary of State. The circumstances under which the meeting was held and the fervid eloquence of the speakers made a profound impression, and those presia with the Moore, Jackson, Lowndes, and Goff families. He had two brothers in the old United States army—Colonel West Moore, for many years Adjutant-General of Louisiana, and Dr. Charles Lloyd Moore, surgeon. In June, 1845, he married Mary Augusta Brown, one of the daughters of Major Jacob Brown, United States army, who was ki
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
gulf end, and the Channel over it was only about ten feet deep, and very tortuous and difficult to navigate. The stream forms a dividing line between Texas and Louisiana, and was once the boundary between the United States and Mexico. Its banks are very low, at the highest places on the Texas side not extending over three feet aed to get out to sea, where she sunk that night with all on board. It is estimated there were at least 250 men lost, and many bodies were found on the shores of Louisiana and Texas. After just thirty-eight minutes from the time Dowling ordered his men to fire the first shot, the white flag was seen to go up on the flagship Clifere conjecture, as the departments at Washington have never revealed it, but there is reason to believe that their intention was to invade Texas, Arkansas and North Louisiana. A plan had been laid by General Banks somewhat to this effect, and judging from the number of troops, 15,000, it is supposed this was the time the scheme wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
Bramlett, company G, 3d regiment. George Ford, company F, 23d regiment. Benjamin Freeman, 13th regiment. H. D. Hodell, company C. George W. Ford, company F, 23d regiment. F. J. Hancock, company H, 20th regiment. A. B. Bigger, company A, 1st regiment. J. T. Cront, company K, 20th regiment. Mathew Jones, company D, 2nd regiment. J. W. Frank, company E, 3rd regiment. Samuel Grodrey, company E, 15th regiment. J. G. Haltewanger, company C, 20th regiment. Miscellaneous. E. W. Snider, Texas. Josiah N. Martin, Louisiana. William Vicker, Baltimore, Md. J. Smith, Maryland. P. M. Koonce, Tennessee. Thomas P. Grey, Rockbridge artillery. Moses Jenkins, company B, 8th artillery. Godfrey Estlow, company K, 6th artillery. D. O. Rawhn, 8th Louisiana artillery. John L. Moise, company H, 17th artillery. L. M. Atkins, company H, 5th artillery. William C. Braddock, company I, 8th artillery. C. Boatner, Phillips' Legion. There are 112 graves unknown.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
s of that period are to be brought to light; how Prince Polignac was sent to Paris to swap off Louisiana for intervention by Louis Napoleon, and to supersede Slidell, while another writer tells us how Mr. Duncan F. Kenner, of Louisiana, was dispatched with authority to supersede both Slidell and Mason. Perhaps this is the proper place to say that the secrets of the Confederate Government were we of the civil war on a mission to the Emperor Napoleon, with authority to offer a transfer of Louisiana to France in exchange for his intervention in favor of the Confederacy is not a lost chapter, acy possessed a singularly able representative at Paris in the person of Hon. John Slidell, of Louisiana, a former associate of Mr. Jefferson Davis in the United States Senate. He was trusted to then equal in the South for a diplomatic post, unless, possibly, Lamar or General Dick Taylor, of Louisiana. These two were men of very striking gifts, and had, I think, the special qualifications requ