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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 974 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 442 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 288 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 246 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 216 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 192 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 166 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 146 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 144 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) or search for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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bring into the field, he could march successfully through that entire section of country. Several hundred men under his command will be composed of the same class that served under Montgomery. There are an army of contractors now in Washington, anxious to serve the Govern ment in the way of furnishing supplies.--They are besieging the War and Navy Departments. There are some very fat contracts to be given out, amounting to several millions of dollars. Congressman Bouligny, of Louisiana, arrived here to-day from New Orleans. He states that four thousand soldiers have left that city for Lynchburg, Va., and that large bodies of troops from other parts of the Confederate States are moving in the same direction. He says that a strong Union settlement still exists in New Orleans, but is kept in complete subjection by the Secessionists. He traveled for some distance with Senator Johnson, who was groaned as a traitor at nearly every station. A fresh batch of army res
Southern Congress. Montgomery, May 8. --In the Congress, to-day, President Cobb read a dispatch from D. P. Hill, Commissioner from Georgia, announcing that the Arkansas Convention had passed unanimously an unconditional ordinance of secession. Mr. Norton, of Florida, offered a resolution of inquiry as to the propriety of appointing chaplains to the navy. Adopted. Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, introduced a bill providing compensation to the disbursing officers of the several Executive Departments. Mr. Conrad, of Louisiana, moved to appoint a Committee on Claims, which was adopted. Secret session followed.
Departure of troops. --The Kentucky and Louisiana troops have been sent to the seaboard. About 350 left Richmond yesterday morning, at 8 o'clock, and nearly 500 left at 9 o'clock. They passed through Petersburg, where they were warmly welcomed. No one could see these troops pass without being filled with admiration at their appearance. One casual glance was enough to convince the beholder that they were worthy defenders of a worthy and righteous cause. May they return to their homes crowned with the lapels of victory.