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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 82 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Lucretius, De Rerum Natura (ed. William Ellery Leonard) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). You can also browse the collection for Gades (Spain) or search for Gades (Spain) in all documents.

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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 4, line 583 (search)
hold in store The fates of former chiefs: and on the place Of happy augury placed his tents ill-starred; Took from the hills their omens; and with force Unequal, challenged his barbarian foe. All Africa that bore the Roman yoke Then lay 'neath Varus. He, though placing first Trust in his Latian troops, from every side And furthest regions, summons to his aid The nations who confessed King Juba's rule. Not any monarch over wider tracts Held the dominion. From the western beltSee line 82. Near Gades, Atlas parts their furthest bounds; But from the southern, Hammon girds them in Hard by the whirlpools; and their burning plains Stretch forth unending 'neath the torrid zone, In breadth its equal, till they reach at length The shore of ocean upon either hand. From all these regions tribes unnumbered flock To Juba's standard: Moors of swarthy hue As though from Ind; Numidian nomads there And Nasamon's needy hordes; and those whose darts Rival the flying arrows of the Mede: Dark Garamantians
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 7, line 87 (search)
vered in air, and shades of kindred dead Passed flitting through the gloom. Yet had the host, Conscious of guilty prayers, and of the hope To do to death their brothers and their sires, One solace: that they found in hearts amazed With horrors, and in earth and air distraught, A happy omen of the crimes to come. Was't strange that peoples whom their latest day Of happy life awaited (if the mind Of man foreknows) should tremble with affright? Romans who dwelt by far Araxes' stream, And Tyrian Gades,Gades (Cadiz) is stated to have been founded by the Phoenicians about 1000 BC. in whatever clime, 'Neath every sky, struck by mysterious dread Were plunged in sorrow-yet rebuked the tear, For yet they knew not of the fatal day. Thus on Euganean hills This alludes to the story told by Plutarch ('Caesar,' 47), that, at Patavium, Caius Cornelius, a man reputed for skill in divination, and a friend of Livy the historian, was sitting to watch the birds that day. 'And first of all (as Livius says
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 9, line 410 (search)
One-third of all the world,Compare Herodotus, ii., 16: 'For they all say that the earth is divided into three parts, Europe, Asia and Libya.' See Bunbury's 'Ancient Geography,' i., 145, 146. I read par in this passage, preferring it to pars with Francken. if fame we trust, Is Libya; yet by winds and sky she proves Equal to Europe; for the shores of Nile No more than Scythian Tanais are remote From furthest Gades, where with bending coast, Yielding a place to Ocean, Europe parts From Afric shores. Yet falls the larger world To Asia only. From the former two Issues the Western wind; but Asia's right Touches the Southern limits and her left The Northern tempest's home, and of the East She's mistress to the rising of the Sun. All that is fertile of the Afric lands Lies to the west, but even here abound No wells of water: though the Northern wind, Infrequent, leaving us with skies serene, Falls there in showers. Not gold nor wealth of brass It yields the seeker; pure and unalloyed Down t