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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 584 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 298 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 112 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 76 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 72 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 52 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 50 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 46 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Maine (Maine, United States) or search for Maine (Maine, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

panic, and at the moment I received the order to retreat, and for some time afterward, it in as good order as in the morning on the road. Half an hour earlier I supposed the victory to be ours. The gallantry with which the Second regiment of Maine, and the Third regiment of Connecticut Volunteers, charged up the hill upon the enemy's artillery and infantry, was never, in my opinion, surpassed. I was with the advancing line, and closely observed the conduct of Cols. Jameson, and Chatfield,xtra services during the day. He also speaks in high praise of Sergeant W. J. Dean, who was mortally wounded while in the my advance of the line, bearing the beautiful stand of colors which were presented the day before on the part of ladies from Maine residing in California. Capt. E. W. Jones, of the same regiment, fell mortally wounded while exhibiting great courage in rallying his men to the charge. Lieut.-Col. Speidal, of the First regiment Connecticut Volunteers, was set upon by three of
he prisoners were driven towards the Junction by the cavalry. During the night a number of prisoners were brought in, and on Monday morning 30 were sent on, their hands tied together in front with Manilla rope; among them was the lad of 17, from Maine, who plead bitterly to be left to see his brother buried, but was refused. During the forenoon an order was issued by Gen. Johnston for every one to be removed from Sudley Church to Richmond, via the Junction. All who were not wounded were tapany H, Seventy-first regiment. Capt. Patrick then inquired if there were any more men who had brothers or relatives among the wounded. A general rush took place among the prisoners — they all stepping forward. He then allowed Atwood Crosby, of Maine, to take care of his brother, who was wounded in the back, and five others: Tompkins, Company C, Seventy-first; John Hand, of Massachusetts; a young boy of the Second Rhode Island, about 17 years old; Deegan, of the Twenty-seventh, and another, a
elled them, and that they are willing to be judged by the sufficiency of her Declaration. Let us, then, examine it. After a feeble and futile defence of the right of secession, they present the Personal Liberty Laws of some of the Northern States as a justification; concerning which they say: We assert that fourteen of the States have deliberately refused for years past to fulfil their constitutional obligations, and we refer to their own statutes for the proof. * * * The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa have enacted laws which either nullify the acts of Congress, or render useless any attempt to execute them. In many of these States the fugitive is discharged from the service or labor claimed, and in none of them has the State Government complied with the stipulation made in the Constitution. The State of New Jersey, at an early day, passed a law in c
the fact that there has been a design to change the nature of our Government. I could refer to Mr. Rhett; I could refer to Mr. Inglis; I could refer to various others to prove this. The Montgomery Daily Advertiser, one of the organs of the so-called Southern Confederacy, says: Has it been a precipitate revolution? It has not. With coolness and deliberation the subject has been thought of for forty years; for ten years it has been the all-absorbing theme in political circles. From Maine to Mexico all the different phases and forms of the question have been presented to the people, until nothing else was thought of, nothing else spoken of, and nothing else taught in many of the political schools. This, in connection with other things, shows that this movement has been long contemplated, and that the idea has been to separate from and break up this Government, to change its nature and character; and now, after they have attempted the separation, if they can succeed, their
Doc. 173 1/2.-U. S. Executive Government, 1857-61. President.--James Buchanan, of Penn. Vice-President.--John C. Breckinridge, of Ky. Secretaries of State.--Lewis Cass, of Michigan; Jeremiah S. Black of Penn., appt. Dec. 17, 1860. Secretary of the Navy.--Isaac Toucey, of Conn. Secretaries of War.--John B. Floyd, of Va.; Joseph Holt, of Ky., appt. Jan. 18, 1861. Secretaries of the Treasury.--Howell Cobb, of Ga.; Philip F. Thomas, of Md., appt. Dec. 12, 1860; John A. Dix, of N. Y., appt. Jan. 11, 1861. Secretary of the Interior.--Jacob Thompson, of Miss. Postmasters-General.--Joseph Holt, of Ky.; Horatio King, of Me., appt. Feb. 12, 1861. Attorneys-General.--Jeremiah S. Black, of Penn.; Edwin M. Stanton, of Penn., appt. Dec. 20, 1860.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 206.-U. S. Executive Government, 1861-65. (search)
Doc. 206.-U. S. Executive Government, 1861-65. Abraham Lincoln, of Ill., President. Hannibal Hamlin, of Me., Vice-President. Secretary of State.--William H. Seward, of N. Y. Secretary of Treasury.--Salmon P. Chase, of Ohio. Secretary of Interior.--Caleb B. Smith, of Indiana. Secretary of Navy.--Gideon Welles, of Conn. Secretary of War.--Simon Cameron, of Penn. Attorney-General.--Edward Bates, of Mo. P. M. General.--Montgomery Blair, of Mo.