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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 584 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 298 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 112 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 76 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 72 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 52 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 50 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 46 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Maine (Maine, United States) or search for Maine (Maine, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 9 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
had once assisted in ransoming a kidnapped free person of color. Lib. 11.146, 211. The sacrifice demanded was made, and even letter-carriers were taught to know the hand that fed them. More significant of the nominal character of the socalled Union were the efforts of Georgia and Virginia, on Lib. 10.1, 5, 9; 11.14, 54, 57, 183. account of the refusal of Northern governors to surrender as felons citizens charged with aiding slaves to escape, to establish quarantine against the ships of Maine and New York. More desperately unconstitutional was the proposal of Governor McDonald of Georgia, that even Lib. 11.183. packages from New York or any like offending State should be subjected to inspection, and suspicious persons therefrom be obliged to give security for good behavior— in the midst of a contented slave population. The Governor of Virginia declined to honor Governor Seward's Lib. 11.54. demand for the extradition of a New York forger—a piece of retaliation too dangerous
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ess will do the work in this State. We have too much to do to allow us to maintain a long contest over so slight a matter. Lib. 12.173. It seemed desirable to meet this Liberty Party manifesto by sending Mr. Garrison to Central and Western New York, which was virgin soil in his experience, whether as a lecturer or a tourist. He had, since June came in, been extremely active in the field, making a memorable first visit to Cape Cod, together with Lib. 12.99, 102, 107, 114. campaigns in Maine, New Hampshire, and various parts of Massachusetts. His adventures in the Mohawk Valley and beyond—the beautiful region settled by New England emigrants, and popularly known as the West even down to the date of this narrative—are related in the following letters, which give a glimpse of the bright and the dark sides of apostolic abolitionism: W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Waterloo [N. Y.], Nov. 21, 1842. Ms. Up to the present time, all's well with me; but, as I anticipated before
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
by which Northern freemen were protected in their liberties was regarded by the South as an infringement of the Constitution, the progress of disunion was considerable in the year 1843. Massachusetts passed, in Lib. 13.55. answer to the Latimer petition, a Personal Liberty Act forbidding judges and justices to take part in the capture Lib. 13.34. of fugitive slaves, and sheriffs, jailors, and constables to detain them. The Governor of Vermont recommended a Lib. 13.170. similar measure. Maine rejected it, as being tantamount Lib. 13.65. to disunion; but imitated Massachusetts in appointing an agent to protect the State's colored seamen in Southern Lib. 13.45, 50, 74, 183. ports. A memorial of Boston shipowners to Congress on this subject elicited a report from the Committee on Commerce (Robert C. Winthrop of Massachusetts, chairman), affirming the unconstitutionality of the Southern laws by which colored seamen were arrested and kept in jail while their vessels lay in port,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
ympathy on his behalf, or in turning his case to anti-slavery account (Lib. 14: 147). And then, as my views on the confounded woman question are materially modified, Ante, 2.318. so far as it is connected with our cause, I might hurt the feelings of my personal friends. These ideas made me delay. Then came my two months prostrating sickness, and now, my trial, in which I suppose you and all my kind friends in Philadelphia feel a deep interest. Mr. Garrison's activity as a speaker, from Maine to Pennsylvania, was very great in the year under review, until the trouble in his side compelled him to withdraw Lib. 14.170; Ms. Oct. 1, 1844, W. L. G. to H. C. Wright. temporarily from the lecture field. As usual, slavery was not his sole topic, but, as occasion offered, he gave addresses on Peace, Worship, the Church, the Ministry, the Sabbath, the Condition and the Rights of Woman. He took part in the Sunday lectures at Amory Hall, Boston, which Lib. 14.19, 23, 27, 67. were a sort o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
ive to remark on Liberty Party endorsement of the Mexican War, even Lib. 16.115; 17.14. Gamaliel Bailey, in his Philanthropist, praying for the safety of the noble Taylor and his brave army. There were other proofs that the party was in a bad way. In the spring of 1846 one of its thirty organs affirmed that its present position is inaction—a perfect standstill. Lib. 16.57. Almost at a dead stand was William Goodells report of progress, speaking both for New York and for Massachusetts. In Maine the State Convention admitted that the party there merely held its own, and looked forward to certain death for the party at large if the stationary stage were not quickly escaped—Joshua Leavitt himself Lib. 16.57. being present, and discounting the impending catastrophe by denying that the party and the ballot-box were the sole Cf. ante, 2.310. means of abolishing slavery. Bailey gave a discouraging account of the Ohio section, and predicted that all would be over with it if it manifeste
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
th by selecting for candidates men not of their party. Leavitt, desirous to equal Goodell, is about to select Hale as their Presidential candidate —a man never of their party. It was prophesied that so fast as men became politicians, they would cease to be frank-spoken, active reformers; and so it has proved. Liberty Party as such is dying, and merging under other names in other movements. The New York bolt was distasteful to the Eastern wing of the Liberty Party. Samuel Fessenden of Maine wrote to the Emancipator: I feel chafed at the idea of our greatest and best men lugging in, as seems to me, by the head and shoulders, so many things to embarrass and cripple our great and glorious cause in which we are engaged. How have we blamed Garrison, and that class of anti-slavery men, for bringing in and mingling with the cause so many exciting topics! Lib. 17.106. In explanation of this passage, Mr. Fessenden wrote to the editor of the Liberator (Ms. July 13, 1847, Lib. 17: 1
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
ll not excuse. Have you ever known him, in any instance, under any circumstances, to excuse an act wilfully committed against the rights of his fellow-men? [ Never! ] I will not retreat a single Inch. Has he acted up to this pledge in fidelity? [ He has. ] I will be heard. These words were doubtless considered bold and presumptuous at the time they were uttered. But the result has proved the truth of the prediction. Mr. Garrison has been heard. At this moment, he is heard and felt from Maine to the mountains of California. Amidst the din created by the strife of contending parties—amidst all the clashing interests of this wide realm—one solitary voice is heard above the whole, demanding, in thunder tones, the freedom of the slave. (Loud applause.) He has been heard on both sides of the Atlantic. The isles of Great Britain know his voice and love it, despite the machinations of his mean and perfidious enemies. England regards him as the Clarkson of America—as the friend of un<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
he Senate. And, fresh from this act of defiance, its Legislature opened, on June 22, the Hall of the House Lib. 25.102. of Representatives to an abolition convention in session at the capital, and listened without disfavor to disunion addresses from Garrison and Phillips. The year closed with an ominous struggle in the Federal House of Lib. 25.203. Representatives over the speakership; the Free-State candidate being Nathaniel P. Banks of Massachusetts, who had lately, in a speech made in Maine, expressed his willingness to let the Union slide in the event of the Lib. 25.181; 26.2. Government falling completely into the hands of the Slave Power. It was reserved for Massachusetts to furnish the most signal examples of resistance to that Power, and to take, logically and in the eyes of the South, a disunion attitude. The first was the address of its Legislature to the Lib. 25.75. Governor, praying for the removal of Edward Greely Loring from his office of Judge of Probate for
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
hether you or I shall occupy the ground of Disunion. It is not a matter of political expediency or policy, or even of incongruity of interests between the North and the South. It strikes deeper, it rises higher, than that. This is the question: Are we of the North not bound in a Union with slaveholders, whereby they are enabled to hold four millions of our countrymen in bondage, with all safety and impunity? Is not Massachusetts in alliance with South Carolina, Rhode Island with Georgia, Maine with Alabama, Vermont with Mississippi, giving the strength of this nation to the side of the dealer in human flesh? My difficulty, therefore, is a moral one. The Union was formed at the expense of the slave population of the land. I cannot swear to uphold it. As I understand it, they who ask me to do so, ask me to do an immoral act—to stain my conscience—to sin against God. How can I do this? I care not what consequences may be predicted. It is a sin to strike hands with thieves, and