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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie. You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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oncerning the depreciation of Southern land, brought to my mind the authority of the fathers of our Republic on the subject. John Sinclair had written to Washington concerning the difference of the land in Pennsylvania from that of Virginia and Maryland. Washington's answer was this: Because there are in Pennsylvania laws for the gradual abolition of slavery, which neither Maryland nor Virginia has at present; but there is nothing more certain than that they must have, and at a period nMaryland nor Virginia has at present; but there is nothing more certain than that they must have, and at a period not remote. The sheriffs statement regarding the liberation of his slaves, was the same as that of John Randolph, Governor of Virginia. The latter said: The deplorable error, of our ancestors in copying a civil institution from savage Africa, has affixed to their posterity, a depressing burden, which nothing but the extraordinary benefits confered by our happy climate could have enabled us to support. We have been far outstripped by States to whom nature has been far less bountiful.
ege to post the secessionists in everything that was favorable to them. This man will be referred to again ere I close this narrative. We were to go by land to Hockinsville, where we were to take the cars. We traveled slowly, in order, as the sheriff remarked, that we might really see the destitute condition of the country through which we passed. We stopped at a place where a deer had just been killed, and obtained some fresh venison. The man from whom we got the meat, was from Eastern Maryland, and, while conversing with him, I found that he had some knowledge of the disunion men of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was deeply opposed to the separation, but at the same time, candidly admitted that the North had sufficient cause therefor. Still he thought that it would have been far better to remain united, and endeavor to reform the proslavery portion. I and this gentleman, said he, turning to the sheriff, have stood up for our faith comparatively alone, until the outb