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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Within a Stone's throw of independence at Gettysburg. (search)
Within a Stone's throw of independence at Gettysburg. Our series of papers on Gettysburg—a summing up of which we may take an early opportunity of making—cannot be carefully studied by the unprejudiced student of history without an overwhelming conviction that if General Lee's orders had been properly carried out at Gettysburg, we would have won that field, crushed General Meade's army, rescued Maryland, captured Washington and Baltimore, and dictated terms of peace on Northern soil. General Lee himself said, with a good deal of feeling, in conversation with some gentlemen in Lexington, Va., not long before his death: If I had had Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg I should have won there a great victory, and if we had reaped the fruits within our reach, we should have established the Independence of the Confederacy. We verily believe that the verdict of impartial History will be that the Confederates would have won Gettysburg, and Independence, but for the failure of one man.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the Arkansas. (search)
hillips, Louisiana. Midshipmen—Dabney M. Scales, Mississippi; Richard H. Bacot, South Carolina, and Clarence W. Tyler, Virginia. Master's Mate, John A. Wilson, Maryland; Surgeon, H. W. M. Washington, Virginia; Assistant Surgeon, C. M. Morfit, Maryland; First Assistant (acting Chief) Engineer, George W. City, Virginia; Second AssMaryland; First Assistant (acting Chief) Engineer, George W. City, Virginia; Second Assistant Engineer, E. Covert, Louisiana; Third Assistant Engineers, W. H. Jackson, Maryland; J. T. Dolan, Virginia; C. H. Browne, Virginia; John S. Dupuy and James Gettis, Louisiana; Gunner, T. B. Travers, Virginia; Pilots—John Hodges, James Brady, William Gilmore and J. H. Shacklett. Captain Brown is now a successful planter, onMaryland; J. T. Dolan, Virginia; C. H. Browne, Virginia; John S. Dupuy and James Gettis, Louisiana; Gunner, T. B. Travers, Virginia; Pilots—John Hodges, James Brady, William Gilmore and J. H. Shacklett. Captain Brown is now a successful planter, on his place in Bolivar county, Mississippi; Stevens, poor fellow, was killed on the Bayou Teche, in Louisiana, during the war; Grimball is a lawyer in New York City; Read commands a fine steamer plying between New Orleans and Havana; Barbot is dead; Millikin and Phillips are both dead; Scales, no longer a big midshipman with a roun<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States a proper book to use in our schools? (search)
Is the Eclectic history of the United States a proper book to use in our schools? We promised in our last issue to fully ventilate this question, and asked that teachers, Confederate soldiers and others in position to know would send us their opinions. We have several responses, and among them the following from Colonel William Allan, superintendent of McDonogh Institute, Maryland. To those who know Colonel Allan, no words from us are necessary to enhance the value of his opinions upon this question. A distinguished Master of Arts of the University of Virginia, and for several years a teacher in one of the best academies in Virginia. For some years after the war one of the accomplished professors whom General Lee called around him to make Washington College an institution of such high grade, and for several years the able and efficient head of McDonogh Institute, Colonel Allan stands in the very forefront of practical teachers, and his opinions about text-books are of hi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
20,000,000, with the rest of the world as their recruiting ground, that the North was the great manufacturing region, and that the Northwest was accustomed to furnish the cotton States with the bulk of their provisions, it seems amazing for any one to argue that the South was in any respect better prepared for war than the North, save in the morale of her soldiers and the patriotic devotion of her noble women. 5. We insist that it is untrue as stated (p. 277) that Missouri, Kentucky and Maryland refused to secede, in the light of General Lyon's operations in Missouri, the arrest and imprisonment of the secession members of the Maryland Legislature, and the pinning of Kentucky to the Union by Federal bayonets. 6. All of the ingenious twisting possible cannot make the account of the Baltimore riot (p. 277) fair, in view of the well-established facts that the troops fired first on the citizens, in response to their jeers and the throwing of several stones from the crowd, and that t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
f you (Patterson was at Harper's Ferry). We would then proceed to General McClellan's theatre of war, and treat him likewise, after which we would pass over into Maryland, to operate in rear of Washington. I think this whole campaign could be completed brilliantly in from fifteen to twenty days. Holmes assented readily; Johnsthours to Manassas, to return swiftly to their former position by the same conveyances, and, with Beauregard's supplemental forces, to destroy Patterson and enter Maryland? All that our army wanted—means of transportation, abundant subsistence, ammunition, and all sorts of equipment—would have been found in Patterson's camp and iny why Patterson was not attacked and the necessities of our destitute army relieved by the capture of his camp, which might have been followed by a march through Maryland to the rear of Washington. Colonel Roman observes: In rejecting this plan (the original plan of concentration and of offensive operations against the enemy) M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer, and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnatti, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
r-minded man can consider the dwarfing of Jackson's Valley campaign into abrilliant dash (p. 291) up the Shenandoah Valley, and the addition of some glittering generalities in the note (p. 303), which the teacher may or may not require the pupil to study, a fair statement of one of the most brilliant campaigns in all history. McDowell, from whence Jackson electrified the Confederacy with his famous dispatch: God blessed our arms with victory at McDowell yesterday—Front Royal, where the two Maryland regiments (Federal and Confederate) had their bloody fight and Jackson flanked Banks—Winchester, where the Federals were driven pell-mell through the streets and Banks won the soubriquet of Stonewall Jackson's Quartermaster —the fighting near Harrisonburg, where Ashby captured Sir Percy Wyndham, and soon after, in a fight with the Bucktails, yielded up his own chivalric spirit in the hour of victory-Cross-Keys, where Ewell whipped Fremont—and Port Republic, where Jackson whipped Shields an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
will respond at once to our call; $3 or $6 is a very small matter to the individual, but the aggregate amount is a very important matter to us. We are pledged not to go in debt, and we beg our friends to enable us to keep our pledge by a prompt remittance of their dues. the annual Reunion of the Virginia division of the army of Northern Virginia Association will take place on the evening of the 23d of October. General Bradley T. Johnson will speak on the Sharpsburg Campaign; a number of Maryland Confederates will make an excursion to Richmond on the occasion, and it is hoped that it will prove one of the most delightful reunions we have ever had. the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society, which usually occurs during the last week in October, the time of the Virginia Agricultural Fair, has been postponed this year to suit the convenience of General M. C. Butler, of South Carolina, who has kindly consented to address the Society, and whose pressing engagements will not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some great constitutional questions. (search)
nstitution, was as follows: We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do Ordain, declare, and establish the following Constitution for the government of ourselves and our posteive people, that is to say, societies, is meant, for only as organized bodies can the people have political mind and act in government. New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, and the rest of the names in the Constitution, mean only the people called by those names—the people of the United States. The people, as States, have the onlynd, of the union of these States, and in 1852, just before his death, he said they never intended to consolidate themselves into one government, and cease to be Maryland and Virginia, Massachusetts and Carolina. He saw that the people were the States and the States the people; and that the real government was the republics, or s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
him a detailed description of the country in Maryland on the other side of the Potomac, of which I revolution, supported by Lee's army, transfer Maryland to the Confederation of States. General Lenvasion of Pennsylvania nor the redemption of Maryland, but only the relief of the Confederacy, as fcult, if not impracticable. The condition of Maryland encouraged the belief that the presence of ou it was that the army which followed Lee into Maryland was so reduced that the statements as to its th apprehensions that Lee's movement into Western Maryland was a strategic ruse to secure from McCle that a portion of that army had crossed into Maryland, but whether it was their intention to cross more than mail. Rev. M. D. Hoge, D. D. 7. Maryland: She met her sisters on the plain, Sic sempeoud refrain, That baffled minions back again, Maryland, my Maryland. General George H. Steuart. Maryland. General George H. Steuart. The speeches were, generally, admirable, and some of them very fine, and the whole occasion one of d[10 more...]