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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
g a country out of chaos. And they accomplished it. To these settlers were soon afterwards added another stream of emigrants, who came into the South through Maryland and Virginia, and through the seaports of the Carolinas and Georgia. These were the God-loving, tyranny-hating Scotch-Irish, who have left their distinguishing characteristics, to this day, upon the people of every State in the South, from Maryland to the Rio Grande. When the struggle came for the defense of their rights against the mother-country, how quickly her sons took up arms in defense of the common cause, and how nobly they performed their part it is useless to say, for is not the confidence born of experience, they generally moved to the larger cities, North or South. Is it more than necessary to mention Frick, Goodman and Smith, of Maryland; Hartshorne, Chapman, Horner, Mitchell, Mutter, and J. L. Cabell, of Virginia; Jones, Chas. Caidwell and Dickson, of North Carolina; Geddings, Bellinger, Toland
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A list of Confederate officers, prisoners, who were held by Federal authority on Morris Island, S. C., under Confederate fire from September 7th to October 21st, 1864. (search)
A list of Confederate officers, prisoners, who were held by Federal authority on Morris Island, S. C., under Confederate fire from September 7th to October 21st, 1864. Maryland. Maj. W. W. Goldsboro, 1st Md. inft., Baltimore. Capt. Geo. Howard, 1st Md. cav., Baltimore. Zzz=Capt. U. H. Griffin, Balto battery, Baltimore. Zzz=Capt. Eugene Diggs, 2d Md. cav., Post Tobacco, Va. 2d Lt. J. E. V. Pue, 1st Md. cav., Ellicott City. 1st Lt. E. G. Dudley, 1st Md. cav. Virginia. ton. Zzz=Capt. John Cowen, 3d inft., Wilmington. Zzz=Capt. H. W. Harm, 3d inft., Fayetteville. Zzz=Capt. W. G. McRae, 7th inft., Wilmington. Zzz=Capt. J. G. Knoy, 7th inft., Rowan. Zzz=Capt. W. H. Ritchie, 12th inft., Scotland, Md. Zzz=Capt. J. W. Lane, 16th inft., Henderson. Zzz=Capt. T. C. Lewis, 18th inft., Wilmington. Zzz=Capt. C. B. Bromly, 20th inft., Concord. Zzz=Capt. A. Y. Cole, 20th inft., Rockingham. Zzz=Capt. N. G. Bradford, 26th inft., Lenoir
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Gen. C. R. Wheat, commander of the Louisiana Tiger Battalion (search)
Memoir of Gen. C. R. Wheat, commander of the Louisiana Tiger Battalion By his brother Leo Wheat. Bury Me on the Field, Boys! Chatham Roberdeau Wheat was born in Alexandria, Va., on the 9th of April, 1826; his father being an Episcopal clergyman, and of an old Maryland family; his mother a granddaughter of Gen. Roberdeau, a Huguenot, and the first general of the Pennsylvania troops in the Revolutionary war; who built a fort at his own expense, and advanced the outfit for our first Commissioners to the court of France. Mr. Wheat was graduated A. B. at the University of Nashville, Tenn., in 1845. Having been chosen the year before, the representative of his literary society in the junior competitive exhibition of oratory, he departed from the established usage by making an extemporaneous address, which gave bright promise of the eloquence for which he became afterwards distinguished. He was reading law at Memphis at the breaking out of the Mexican war, and was among the f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ch Richmond was relieved of the presence of a great investing army, to which her spires had for weeks been visible; the second and greater victory at Manassas, which rolled the tide of invasion back across the border; the Confederate invasion of Maryland; the capture of Harper's Ferry; the great battle of Sharpsburg, where thirty-five thousand Confederates divided the honors with eighty-seven thousand Federals; Fredericksburg, from whose encircling hills the gallant and mighty Army of the Potomaory at Shiloh. The death of Albert Sidney Johnston was an irreparable loss to his army and to the Confederacy. Earth never bore a nobler son or heaven opened wide its gates to receive a knightlier spirit. The border States. Operations in Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri had decided finally the status of the border States towards the Confederacy. The shackles of Federal power had been firmly riveted upon them, and henceforth their gallant sons, who upheld the rights of their States and t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life, services and character of Jefferson Davis. (search)
l have it thus, we will invoke the God of our fathers who delivered them from the power of the Lion to protect us from the ravages of the Bear, and thus putting our trust in God, and in our firm hearts and strong arms we will vindicate the right as best we may. Secession and Virginia. Well was that pledge redeemed. South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, and North Carolina, Arkansas, and Tennessee, all seceded, while Kentucky, Missouri and Maryland were divided in sentiment. Jefferson Davis became by unanimous selection President of the Confederate States of America; the capital, first planted at Montgomery, was removed here to Richmond, and for four years the new republic waged for its life the mightiest warfare of modern times. There was something melancholy and grand, says a Northern historian, in the motives that caused Virginia at last to make common cause with the South. Having made it, she has borne her part with a sublimity
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
details of the action of Kentucky and Missouri during the same time, it is enough to say that prior to April 15, 1861, the people of those States were, if possible, more decided in their opposition to secession than the people of Virginia. In Maryland, before the date I have mentioned, practically the whole population was opposed to the action of the cotton States and desirous of a peaceful solution of the public difficulties and the maintenance of the Union. You will thus see that the peoonal declaration in favor of secession, on the 17th of April an ordinance of secession was adopted by a vote of 88 to 55, and the majority vote was afterwards increased to 91. The change in the feeling of the people of Kentucky, Missouri, and Maryland was equally marked, although its free expression was prevented by force, and the action of the Federal Government was resented where the ability to resist was wanting. The differences to which I have referred as existing among the people of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
ed, white, and red—dear to the hearts of true Maryland women. The union shown on one side the arms of Maryland; on the other a blue field with eleven golden stars and the legend, Hope is Our Watchwory carefully by one of Virginia's daughters in Maryland, and yesterday one of the few survivors of Cothrough the streets of Richmond as one of the Maryland Line here to honor the memory of Virginia's geful affairs of State. Men and officers from Maryland to Texas came to old Virginia once more to slonel T. Smith commander. Frederick county Maryland camp, Rev. C. Randolph Page commander. Thind Navy of the Confederate States in the State of Maryland; the Association of the Maryland Line; Bn R. E. Lee, ex-Governor John Lee Carroll, of Maryland, Senator Randall Lee Gibson of Louisiana, Gen passing. The splendid Maryland bands played Maryland, My Maryland, as they passed, and at the last limb in our service. Tennessee, Kentucky, Maryland, and West Virginia are here, represented by d[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Robert Edward Lee. (search)
mmortal march to Pope's rear, which Lee approved and ordered. You know how, after prodigies of rapid movement, obstinate fighting and intrepid guidance, the Army of Northern Virginia stood once more united on the plains of Manassas, and there baffled and crushed an adversary, its superior, by one-half in numbers. Again the Federal army turned its back upon the goal of the campaign; again the Federal army bent its march, not to its commander's, but to Lee's imperious will. The invasion of Maryland, the capture of Harper's Ferry attested it, and Lee's victorious sweep was only checked by one of those unlucky accidents inseparable from war. His order for the combined movements of his troops fell into McClellan's hands when the ink upon it was scarcely dry. This precipitated the great battle of Sharpsburg. On that sanguinary field 40,000 Confederates finally repulsed every attack of an army of 87,000 Federal soldiers. On the day following the battle they grimly stood in their lon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters of R. E. Lee. (search)
Quartermaster's Department can furnish any shoes it would be the greatest relief. We have entered upon September, and the nights are becoming cool. Two miles from Frederick, Md., September 7, 1862. His Excellency, President Davis: I shall endeavor to purchase horses, clothing, shoes, and medical stores for our present use, and you will see the facility that would arise from being provided with the means of paying for them. Report of the capture of Harper's Ferry and operations in Maryland. Although not properly equipped for invasion, lacking much of the material of war and feeble in transportation, the troops poorly provided with clothing, and thousands of them destitute of shoes, it was yet believed to be strong enough to detain the enemy upon the northern frontier until the approach of winter should render his advance into Virginia difficult if not impossible. * * * * * * The arduous service in which our troops had been engaged, their great privations of rest and food,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] (search)
e figure of the Confederate soldier was to be seen when the canvas was drawn aside—uplifted on his pedestal, right in the midst of the graves of the intrepid men of whose valor he was the embodiment. In every quarter, albeit he stood four-square to all the winds, this Confederate in bronze could not but face some memorable field of carnage, could not but face the grave of some fellow-soldier who had died in battle. Look at the head-boards and call the roll. There was Louisiana, there was Maryland—there were all the States of the Confederacy. Grave after grave they all told their eloquent story—These died for their State. From the extreme northern boundary of the Confederate States to its uttermost southern limit the muster roll might have been called, and the response would have been, Dead on the field of battle. Certainly it has been a great day for Petersburg, and a greater day for the dead who died in the cause. The sound of drum and fife, the gathering together of veterans<
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