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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 10, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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efused. The Government desire the requisition for the regulars to be filled before accepting any more volunteers. Major Anderson was moved to tears by the offer of the command of the Kentucky brigade. He expressed his hearty willingness to accept it, if the consent of the Department can be gained. Leading Union men from Kentucky now here are very anxious to have the necessary permission given, as they all believe it would greatly strengthen the Union feeling in their State. The Maryland authorities having reluctantly, but meekly notified the Government that Northern troops could pass through their State unmolested, Gen. Patterson will not move his corps d'armee in a body towards Washington, but in detachments of from two to three regiments. They will commence moving from York, Harrisburg, Lancaster and Philadelphia, as soon as the repairs on the Northern Central and Philadelphia and Wilmington Railroad are completed, and march through Baltimore to test the temper of that
rts to free ourselves from the tyranny of that man; and in the attitude at present occupied by the State, it was giving aid and comfort to the enemy, and was treason. He felt it to be his duty to remand the prisoner, as one of the guardians of the public safety and peace. The prisoner solicited his release on the grounds of ignorance of the meaning of the words Black Republican, &c. He was very drunk when he used them. He could not read — was born and brought up near Ellicott's Mills, in Maryland--was a good citizen, and worked prior to his arrest for Haxall, Crenshaw & Co. The plea of the prisoner did not avail. He was sent down as an enemy of the public peace. A man calling himself Wm. H. Frear, was also arraigned, charged with being a person of suspicious character--one having feelings and sympathies with the North. Mr. John W. Davies testified that he had heard Frear use words in conversation calculated to produce that impression on his mind. He had vaunted the superiori
whereas, the State of Virginia has seceded from the Federal Union and entered into a convention of alliance, offensive and defensive, with the Confederate States, and has adopted the Provisional Constitution of the said States, and the States of Maryland, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, and Missouri, have refused, and it is believed that the State of Delaware and the nts of the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico, and the Indian Territory south of Kansas, will refuse to co-opera finally subjugate the people of the Confederate States, and whereas, by the acts and means aforesaid war exists between the Confederate States and the Government of the United States, and the States and Territories thereof, except the States of Maryland, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, Missouri, and Delaware, and the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico, and the Indian Territory south of Kansas: Therefore. Section 1. The Congress of the Confederate States of America do en
Major W. M. Emory's resignation has been received at the War Department. He is a native of Maryland.
ly comply with the request of "A Subscriber," and publish the substance of a speech delivered by Rufus Barringer, Esq., in Concord, N. C., on the 20th ult; Mr. Barringer after reciting the condition of affairs at Washington, in Virginia and Maryland, and in the middle and eastern parts of the State, went on to say that he hoped the people of Cabarrus, intelligent, prompt and public-spirited, would do their whole duty in the present crisis. All who were able to fight should be prepared to dnd reported to the Governor at once. Let all men spare time enough to drill. Arrange your business so as to leave at a moment's warning. Save the State and yourself all you can; but spare nothing necessary to our common defence. Virginia and Maryland are as dear to us now as our own people. A common interest, a fellow feeling and a generous sentiment, all inspire us to stand or fall together. We may still talk about the old Stars and Stripes. We may look to a middle Confederacy, or we may
The Daily Dispatch: may 10, 1861., [Electronic resource], Can the South support a Government? (search)
morasses, and still carry on the war, until ultimately their invaders will be driven from their soil. They never will be conquered. Then, why make war upon them? Why sacrifice thousands of precious lives and hundreds of millions of money, when, in the end, it will avail nothing? "We are not for the invasion of the South. We are for the defence of the North. If our brethren of the South invade the North, we are for repelling them. We are for defending the city of Washington until Maryland shall secede. As long as that State shall remain in the Northern Union, we are for defending the integrity of her soil, and that embraces the city of Washington. It she secedes, it will be useless even to defend Washington." In reply to threats of violence by the Republicans, the Standard says: "No. Beware of attempting a Reign of Terror, among the other calamities which your policy has brought upon your country. Do that, and you initiate a civil war at your own doors. You
The Daily Dispatch: may 10, 1861., [Electronic resource], Can the South support a Government? (search)
Police Arrests. --Yesterday, Ellick, slave of Wm. Knight, was punished by Alderman Sadler for stealing chickens from the First Market. J. S. Vorhies (or a man giving that name) was brought to the Station-House and delivered to officer Blankenship by three gentlemen from Maryland, who regarded his conduct as suspicious. Vorhies, who is a tall, red-headed man, got on at Louisa Court-House, and the parties concerned in his arrest were led to believe him a Northern spy, from various statements of a contradictory character he made to them about his business, where from, &c. He had a lot of papers in cypher that he said was a sermon. The officers took possession of them. Peter T. Allen and Thos. Walker were arrested for fighting in the arch of the Old Market-House. Allen, after being locked up, behaved in the most disorderly manner, kicking the doors of the cells, yelling, &c. He is supposed to be a Baltimore "Blood Tub."
The Daily Dispatch: may 10, 1861., [Electronic resource], Can the South support a Government? (search)
their baggage generally subjected to a vigorous search. This is but a foretaste of the outrages upon private rights. From these Baltimorean, I learned that Maryland is confounded by the display of superior force, at present. Flying rumors about the collection of Pennsylvania troops upon the Maryland line are in constant cirMaryland line are in constant circulation here. But it is hard to tell what to believe. Many here are exceedingly anxious to march, but I suppose that no attack will be made upon any point in Maryland without some invitation from the authorities of that State. It is said here, and believed by many that 5,000 Federal troops will take possession of Frederick citMaryland without some invitation from the authorities of that State. It is said here, and believed by many that 5,000 Federal troops will take possession of Frederick city to-day. It is certain that arrangements are being made there for the accommodation of a large number of troops. It is said that Carlile, from Harrison county, Va., is in Pennsylvania endeavoring to raise men and troops to resist Virginia.--There is no doubt of the fact that there is much disaffection in two or three counti
camp and replenish our somewhat scanty commissariat. But to his disgust and horror he finds well-authenticated evidence that a private in the Sixth Regiment has been poisoned by means of strychnine administered in the food brought into the camp by one of these peddlers. I am happy to be informed that the man is now out of danger. This act, of course, will render it necessary for me to cut off all purchases from unauthorized persons. Are our few insane enemies among the loyal men of Maryland prepared to wage war upon us in this manner? Do they know the terrible lesson of warfare they are teaching us? Can it be that they realize the fact that we can put an agent with a word into every household armed with this terrible weapon? In view of the terrible consequences of this mode of warfare, if adopted by us from their teaching, with every sentiment of devotional prayer may we not exclaim: "Father, forgive them! they know not what they do!" Certain it is that any other su
ed $100,000 reward for his head. There is no such thing as backing down on the part of the Southern troops. In my opinion they will fight desperately and to the last. Their intention was to move on Washington this week, lest the action of Maryland should have a dampening effect on the other Border States. By a battle at or near Washington, it is expected that Maryland and all the Border States will be precipitated into the revolution. In Virginia many of the people of both parties wly and to the last. Their intention was to move on Washington this week, lest the action of Maryland should have a dampening effect on the other Border States. By a battle at or near Washington, it is expected that Maryland and all the Border States will be precipitated into the revolution. In Virginia many of the people of both parties were fleeing to the mountains — the non- combatant secessionists from fear of the abolitionist hordes, and the Union men from fear of the secessionists.