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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

The position of Maryland. The Baltimore Exchange protests, in the name of the people of Maryland, against the high-handed measures which the Administration has adopted for the purpose of crushing out, by force of arms, all opposition in that State to as lawless and tyrannical an exercise of power as ever disgraced the annalsMaryland, against the high-handed measures which the Administration has adopted for the purpose of crushing out, by force of arms, all opposition in that State to as lawless and tyrannical an exercise of power as ever disgraced the annals of a nation. It says; If, however, the hope is entertained that by adopting this tyrannical system of repression and suppression, the Southern sympathies of the people of Maryland will be crushed out, we frankly tell those who are possessed of this delusion, not to be deceived by appearances. Whatever may be the opinions Maryland will be crushed out, we frankly tell those who are possessed of this delusion, not to be deceived by appearances. Whatever may be the opinions that are held among us, they cannot be radically changed by a display of force. There may be, and doubtless is, at this juncture, a singular calmness on the surface; but who can measure the strength of the under-current? With the exception of those who are timid and timeserving, there are very few among us who have not made up t
es is unconstitutional, repugnant to civilization and sound policy, and subversive of our free institutions. A protest is entered against the war on the part of Maryland; she declares that she will take no part, directly or indirectly, in its prosecution, and the assertion is made that Maryland desires a peaceful and immediate reMaryland desires a peaceful and immediate recognition of the independence of the seceded States. The present military occupation of the State of Maryland is protested against as unconstitutional, oppressive and illegal; and the final resolution asserts that, under existing circumstances, it is inexpedient to call a sovereign Convention at this time, or to take measures forState of Maryland is protested against as unconstitutional, oppressive and illegal; and the final resolution asserts that, under existing circumstances, it is inexpedient to call a sovereign Convention at this time, or to take measures for the immediate arming and organization of the militia, and propose an adjournment of the Legislature to a day to be named hereafter. The report was adopted — ayes 49, noes 11--and the resolutions were made the order of the day for this morning. The Federal troops passed through Baltimore yesterday. About 3 o'clock in the
Maryland. --In the Maryland Senate on Wednesday, the resolution to appoint committees to visit Presidents Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, and the Governors of Virginia and Pennsylvania, were filled by electing Messrs. Brooke, Yellott, McKaig and Lynch as the committee on the part of the Senate, and ordered to a third reading.
It was the gradual and enduring subjugation of the South through the arts of peace, and under the semblance of friendship; but none the less certain and dangerous because pacific and unobserved. The open war of subjugation is a child's play, compared to the insidious policy which had already begun to exert its benumbing influence upon the political, social and even physical capacities of the Southern States; which had insinuated its virus into sections of slaveholding Virginia, Kentucky, Maryland and Missouri, and was breathing upon every gale that moral miasma whose seeds of death might ultimately have taken root in our genial soil, and which had fixed its serpent gaze upon the fierce eye of the Southern eagle, till the proud bird seemed ready to fall into the sleep of death. What department of human enterprise had it not monopolized and driven off all competition? What vein of the South had it not fastened on with the appetite of a bloodsucker? We need not speak of the five
An available position occupied. Alexandria, May 10. --The heights of Maryland, opposite Harper's Ferry, were taken possession of by the Virginia forces yesterday. There is no news of interest from Washington.