hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 2 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1862., [Electronic resource], Our army in Maryland--particulars of the passage of the Potomac. (search)
Our army in Maryland--particulars of the passage of the Potomac. The news received yesterday afternoon removes every doubt that may have heretofore existed with reference to the passage of the Pgives us the unmistakable assurance that the feet of our gallant soldiers now tread the soil of Maryland. A distinguished officer, who participated in the fights at and around Manassas, arrived iere were not a few reports in circulation yesterday in regard to the movements of our troops in Maryland. These of course originate in the brisk imaginations of those who have little else to do than movements of our forces, we do not doubt, but reports as to their operations since they reached Maryland are premature. Our informant left Leesburg on Saturday morning, and the news he brings is as late as any received.--When he left for Richmond, the main body of the army was in Maryland, but of any active movement there he was not advised, nor would be proper to make them known. In the 4t
The exact movements of Jackson are not known, but the report of his meditating a march into Maryland is universally credited. The Government is understood to be fully prepared for this, Gen. Woolthe expected invaders. In connection with this I will state that the private accounts from Maryland are not such as the loyal men of the nation would desire, for it is boldly stated that should Jailroad and Leesburg! The body of the rebel army lies near Drainesville. They must cross into Maryland for supplies, starve, or fall back to the Rappahannock. They will, no doubt, risk a crossing. fail now in their calculations to take or burn Washington, to capture Baltimore, and to occupy Maryland, and capture or destroy Cincinnati and Louisville. But the plans show the desperation of the rprepare to meet it. Above all, let Philadelphia take heed. With the upper Potomac forded, with Maryland in arms, can we fancy ourselves secure? We are no alarmists, but it is better to be even alarm