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been removed, I believe the siege-gun found in Fort Page the only one of that character used by the enemy during the day. Where Hooker had fought the signs of slaughter were abundant. Though many of the bodies had been buried, there were enough yet exposed to show the terrible effect of his shot. Bramhall's horses were thickly scattered over the ground, a certificate to his precarious position. That he managed to escape with his life is a wonder of the day. Here, too, we saw where Massachusetts and New-Hampshire men and the Sickles brigade had met the enemy, and where the Jerseymen, under the younger Patterson, had proven worthy their fathers of Monmouth and Trenton. The acres of felled and tangled trees had greatly impeded our progress, and held many of our brave fellows under the enemy's galling fire. This was by far the best defended portion of his lines, and would probably have been held much longer but for Hancock's coup de maitre. All over the battle-field our inquis
ts and the noble Third Wisconsin, who had stood as if made up of brothers that day, left each four companies, still doing duty on the Virginia shore. I have said little of any but of our Second, both because it will answer the enquiries of Massachusetts readers, and because it had the hardest fighting. Its loss it cannot yet tell, as more are hoped to have escaped, who sank from sickness in crowds. But, as yet, the noble Major Dwight, as gallant an officer as ever lived, generous, beloved, are known to be wounded, and one hundred and thirty are missing; as many have come in; there is reason to fear that, of the latter number, many are wounded and some dead. If we have felt sad that the Second has had no such chance as other Massachusetts regiments — now it has been tried. It has marched in retreat fifty-three miles in thirty-two hours, in perfect order, though fighting a large part of the way, and for most of it was rear-guard, followed by an overwhelming force. It fought t
ey got was cutting. The wood edge was strewn with the dying and dead. Thirty or forty bodies were picked up here. The movement was foiled. Nothing was left but retreat from every portion of the field. It was a bloody fight, fought against odds by exhausted men, without preparation. It was a signal victory of Southern patriots over the murderous invaders of the soil. The five regiments attacking are said to be the Seventy-ninth New-York (Highlanders) the Eighth Michigan, one from Massachusetts, a New-Hampshire and Connecticut regiments. But for the distance of our troops and the brief time occupied in the action, together with obstructions in the road, preventing the passage of light artillery to the enemy's rear, their whole force might perhaps have been taken or cut up. From the account of prisoners, who assert that there were nine United States regiments out that morning, it is probable that four regiments were held in reserve to support the five engaged, and to protect th
driven from his camps in front of this, and all is now quiet. G. B. McClellan, Major-General Commanding. Report of Colonel Cowdin. headquarters First regiment mass. Vols., camp at Fair Oaks, Va., June 26. Wm. Schouler, Adj.-Gen. of Massachusetts: General: In accordance with orders from the Brigade-General commanding the First brigade, I left my camp at Fair Oaks yesterday morning, and proceeded with.my command to the front into the fallen timber, where I deployed the regiment as sded. The most painful misfortune of the day was the mortal wounding of Lieut. Bullock, of the Seventh Massachusetts, who was struck in the back by a fragment of one of our own shells, while he was leading his company to support the battery. Massachusetts again suffered heavily. The First regiment lost ten killed and one hundred and nineteen wounded; the Seventh, two killed, fourteen wounded; the Eleventh and Sixteenth suffered somewhat, and the Nineteenth lost some forty-five men. Sickles's
learn the whereabouts of the brigade said to have been captured by Heintzelman. Think it a false report, invented to keep up courage — which was not necessary, for the men, jaded as they were, noble fellows, cheered when summoned to battle, and swore to die game. Said I to a rebel officer: Do your men respect Yankee fighters? Yes, sir; they surprise us. Said I: Others have broken and retired; the genuine Yankees of New-England have never faltered on the Chickahominy. It is true; and Massachusetts mourns more dead soldiers, comparatively, than any State's quota in the Army of the Potomac. Tuesday, the first of July, was not a cheerful day. The prospect was not happy. The Prince de Joinville, always gay and active as a lad, and always where there was battle, had gone. The Count de Paris, heir to the Bourbon throne, and the Duke de Chartres, his brother, the two chivalric and devoted aids to Gen. McClellan, on whose courage, fidelity, intelligence, and activity he safely relied
ivity in searching for our wounded, and his devotion to them when found. His labors only ended on our abandonment of the field. To Capt. Dickinson, Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieuts. Lawrence and Candler, Aids-de-Camp, I tender my sincere thanks for their services. Very respectfully, etc., Joseph Hooker, Brig.-General Commanding Division. Official report of Colonel Cowdin. headquarters First Massachusetts volunteers, July 11, 1862. William Schouler, Adjutant-General of Massachusetts: sir: I make to you the following report of the part taken in the battle of Nelson's Farm, near White Oak swamp, by the regiment under my command, Monday, June thirtieth: During the action, I was ordered to charge on the enemy in. front, at considerable distance, which I did, passing over a fence, across a field, and through the woods, the rebels falling back before us. We still advanced through an open field. Here we advanced in line of battle, when a brigade of troops, dressed i
nel Sixth Michigan volunteers. B--Major H. O. Whittemore, commanding Thirtieth Massachusetts volunteers. C--First Lieut.----Trull, commanding Nim's battery, (Mass.) D--Capt.----Manning, Fourth. E--First Lieut.----Brown, commanding three pieces Indiana battery. F--Lieut.-Col.----Callum, commanding Seventh Vermont volu the lamented Williams, prosecuted the engagement to its ultimate glorious success, and made all proper dispositions for a further attack. Magee's cavalry, (Massachusetts,) by their unwearied exertions on picket-duty, contributed largely to our success, and deserve favorable mention. The patriotic courage of the following off two roads at right angles, while extending from road to road is a large cemetery, facing towards the city, and looking directly into the camps of the Indiana, Massachusetts and Connecticut regiments. The front of this cemetery is fenced with paling, while the cemetery is thickly strewn with large tombs, and overgrown with high ra
easily been removed, but he knew that the wound was a fatal one, and preferred remaining behind Upon the fall back, Gen. Breckinridge ordered the various camps and stores of the enemy to be destroyed. This was accordingly done, and a vast amount of property was burned. There were huge piles of pork, beef, bacon, flour, whisky, molasses, and sugar, quantities of clothing, at which our troops looked wistfully, all given to the flames. The encampments were those of the Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New-Hampshire, Michigan, and Indiana regiments. There was an air of comfort about all of the tents, and luxurious appointments in many of them. The sutler's stores were crowded with delicacies. But nothing escaped. Many letters, pictures, and documents were picked up, but the boys brought away no booty. Had our means of transportation been more extensive, we could have brought off a month's supply for our army. Gen. Breckinridge intrusted the delicate and important duty of holdi
considerably increased as the reports from the companies are corrected. Several of the non-commissioned officers and privates were conspicuous for coolness and good conduct in action. Their names will be published as soon as a perfect list can be made. Respectfully, your ob't servant, Geo. L. Andrews, Colonel Second Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. headquarters Second regiment mass. Vols., camp near Culpeper, Va., August 13, 1862. Brigadier-General Wm. Schouler, Adjutant-General Massachusetts: sir: I have the honor to forward to you the following list of killed and wounded and missing from this regiment in the action of August ninth, near Cedar Mountain, Va.: field-officers.--Wounded, Major Savage; taken prisoner. regimental Staff.--Surgeon Leland, wounded slightly in the head. band.--Smeath and Rawson, missing. killed and wounded.--Company A--Killed: Capt. Abbott, Sergt. E. B. Whitten, Corp. J. C. Bassett, privates H. C. Bright, J. Flemming, L. H. Dyer, M. S.
considerably increased as the reports from the companies are corrected. Several of the non-commissioned officers and privates were conspicuous for coolness and good conduct in action. Their names will be published as soon as a perfect list can be made. Respectfully, your ob't servant, Geo. L. Andrews, Colonel Second Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. headquarters Second regiment mass. Vols., camp near Culpeper, Va., August 13, 1862. Brigadier-General Wm. Schouler, Adjutant-General Massachusetts: sir: I have the honor to forward to you the following list of killed and wounded and missing from this regiment in the action of August ninth, near Cedar Mountain, Va.: field-officers.--Wounded, Major Savage; taken prisoner. regimental Staff.--Surgeon Leland, wounded slightly in the head. band.--Smeath and Rawson, missing. killed and wounded.--Company A--Killed: Capt. Abbott, Sergt. E. B. Whitten, Corp. J. C. Bassett, privates H. C. Bright, J. Flemming, L. H. Dyer, M. S.
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