Browsing named entities in Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters. You can also browse the collection for Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Books consulted in preparation of this work War of the Rebellion, Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Massachusetts in the Civil War. I. L. Bowen. History of the Civil War. B. J. Lossing. Putnam's Record of the Rebellion. Moore. Century Company's War Book. The Mississippi. J. V. Greene. The Nineteenth Army Corps. Irwin. Regimental and Battery Histories of New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Books consulted in preparation of this work War of the Rebellion, Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Massachusetts in the Civil War. I. L. Bowen. History of the Civil War. B. J. Lossing. Putnam's Record of the Rebellion. Moore. Century Company's War Book. The Mississippi. J. V. Greene. The Nineteenth Army Corps. Irwin. Regimental and Battery Histories of New Hampshire and Massachusetts.
as in readiness and in the early morning of the 21st the first battery from Massachusetts was on its way to Baltimore for a period of three months service. It haders were commissioned. This was the first three years battery from the state of Massachusetts. It was supposed that Major Cobb would take the battery into servicehe Pratt Street depot for the purpose of receiving and escorting two of our Massachusetts regiments, but they did not arrive, thus disappointing us and themselves, ws in the advance, followed three yards in the rear by the 4th pb id= p.50 > Massachusetts and 110th New York with grenades which were to be thrown over, the instant rank of captain. During the same month about seventy recruits arrived from Massachusetts, so that drilling appears again as the order of the day. Nor was this time g the stay a handsome guidon was presented to the members of the battery by Massachusetts friends then residing in New Orleans. This guidon was presented by Captain
nner was served, General Schouler was called upon and said he was glad to meet Colonel Nims and his old command and would only say what was said of them when at the front that this battery was one of the best, if not the best, that went from Massachusetts. . . . The regular toasts were then announced. Our Country—response by Mr. Thomas Knights who sang America. Massachusetts—response by Captain Marland. Nims' Battery—response letter from Col. H. E. Paine, etc. Another interesting Massachusetts—response by Captain Marland. Nims' Battery—response letter from Col. H. E. Paine, etc. Another interesting meeting was held on December 12, 1879. It was the first gathering of the old organization which had occurred for five years and fully 40 members were present accompanied by several of the 13th Battery. The early part of the evening was spent in social intercourse, singing of songs, and the election of officers. The after dinner exercises included speeches, reminiscences of camp life and interesting facts concerning the association since the close of the war. Letters of regret were received
the town of Roxbury. This estate is at present occupied by David Brigham Nims, his great great-grandson. He had ten children one of whom Asahel fell at the battle of Bunker Hill. On the morning when Captain Wyman and his men left Keene for Massachusetts, Asahel came into town from his home on the Sullivan Hills where he was clearing land and getting ready to settle with one whom he hoped soon to marry. He saw the military movement and was fired with that spirit of military and patriotic fer business for himself. His first taste of a military career had been when, a boy of fifteen, he had joined the Sullivan Militia commanded by his brother. In 1853 he with his two brothers joined the Lancers and this branch of the militia of Massachusetts had no more ardent members than these three young men from New Hampshire. It happened that about this time General Sherman's Battery of United States artillery came to Boston from Newport for the purpose of giving an exhibition in encampme