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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Not afraid of Yanks. (search)
, who was teaching in his school at the Anderson Seminary the day before when I summoned him to report for duty at the front, as I have already related. You will notice that Butler used the word examined in his letter to Gilmore. It is a term that a military man to the manner born and bred would hardly use. In truth, he was more at home in examining witnesses than in commanding armies, and doubtless many an unlucky wight has quailed before the searching interrogatories of the astute Massachusetts lawyer and pseudo warrior. During the day a piece of artillery was brought up before Butler's tent for his inspection, and I recognized it as the gun of Sturdivant's latter which was captured the day before. Late in the afternoon we were taken down to Bermuda Hundred, where our quarters for the night were in a small frame house, subjected to the humiliation of being guarded by a company of negro cavalry. The next day we were put on board a steamboat on our way to Fortress Monroe.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
his courage, constancy, fidelity and fortitude, in facing and enduring peril and privation. The address. This is the history of the only Virginia troops engaged in the defense of Vicksburg, upon the battleground preserved in the amber of this great military park. Fighting for the South were many gallant Mississippians, and regiments from Alabama and Georgia, from the Carolinas, Tennessee, Arkansas and Missouri, Texas and Louisiana. On the other side, fighting for the North, were Massachusetts and New York, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa, Wisconsin, Ohio, Minnesota and Michigan. These hundred or more men, this company known as the Botetourt Artillery, were the only Virginians. It is to them that this stone is raised, and it is to their war song that we listen to-day. They were born, these men, in the State of Virginia, in the County of Botetourt, in a region of wheatfields and orchards, of smiling farms and friendly villages, of high blue mountains and clear flowing rivers.