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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 15: Academic life in Cambridge (search)
e work is like a great hand laid on all the strings of my lyre, stopping their vibrations. How the days resemble each other and how sad it is to me that I cannot give them all to my poem. have fallen into a very unpoetic mood and cannot write. It must be remembered that his eyes were at this time very weak, that he suffered extremely from neuralgia, and that these entries were all made during the great fugitive slave excitement which agitated New England, and the political overturn in Massachusetts which culminated in the election of the poet's most intimate friend, Sumner, to the United States Senate. He records the occurrence of his forty-fourth birthday, and soon after when he is stereotyping the Golden Legend he says: I still work a good deal upon it, but also writes, only two days after, Working hard with college classes to have them ready for their examinations. A fortnight later he says: Examination in my department; always to me a day of anguish and exhaustion. His corre
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Appendix I: Genealogy (search)
for 4 hearths), with gardens, closes, crofts, etc. He had two sons, Nathan and William, and four or five daughters. William was baptized at Guiseley (the parish church of Horsforth), October 20, 1650. The first of the name in America was this William, son of William of Horsforth. He came over, a young man, to Newbury, Massachusetts, about 1676. Soon after, he married Anne Sewall, daughter of Henry Sewall, of Newbury, and sister of Samuel Sewall, afterward the first chief justice of Massachusetts. He received from his father-in-law a farm in the parish of Byfield, on the Parker River. In 1680 Samuel Sewall wrote to his brother in England: Brother Longfellow's father Wm lives at Horsforth, near Leeds. Tell him bro. has a son William, a fine likely child, and a very good piece of land, and greatly wants a little stock to manage it. And that father has paid for him upwards of an hundred pounds to get him out of debt. In 1688 William Longfellow is entered upon the town records
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
his literary alterations, 269. Lowell, Miss, Sally, 121. Lucerne, 8. Lugano, 224. Lundy, Benjamin, his Genius of Universal Emancipation, mentioned, 163. Lunt, George, 165. Lyly, John, 55. McHenry, Dr., James, praises Longfellow, 22. McLane, Mr., 118. Madrid, 50. Maine, 11, 17, 208; Cumberland County, 220. Maler River, the, 93. Malherbe, Francis de, 191. Marienberg, 157, 161, 170. Marseilles, 3, 94. Marshall, Emily, 19. Marshall, Chief Justice, John, 6. Massachusetts, 186; Legislature, 11. Mather, Cotton, 138,239; his Magnalia, mentioned, 149. Matsys, Quintin, 161. Mayence, 162. Mayflower (ship), 13. Medici, Cosmo de, 164. Mellen, Mr., 140. Mellen, Judge, 17. Mellen, Frederic, 17. Mellen, Grenville, 23. Menzel, Charles Adolphus, his History of German Literature, mentioned, 112. Mexico, 263. Middleton, Thomas, 188. Milton, John, 268. Mittermaier, Karl J. A., 112. Moliere, Jean B. P. de, 121,176. Montalvan, John P. de, 188