Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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nto line, turned to the right face and escorted them to the Capitol. There were twenty-one military companies in the line, including one company of U. S. troops, and there were a number of civic associations. Among them the following: Republican Association and Wide-Awakes, numbering 500 men, the former designated by a silver button and the red-white-and-blue sprig, and the latter by a silver eagle on the lapel. They were headed by Capt. Smith. New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts delegations, each wearing an evergreen sprig in the lapel of the coat. They were headed by Marshals Gen. J. C. Abbott, Gen. H. H. Baxter, and Major Rogers. The three States turned out about 250 men in the line, and, as one of them told us, confidentially, with "nary office-seeker amongst them." Next came the great car of the Republican Association, placed on the running gear of one of Vanderwerken's large omnibuses, with pyramidal seats culminating in the centre, from which rose a
The Sardinian Minister will be the subject of a hard struggle among the patriots. James O. Putnam, of N. Y., Geo. P. Marsh, of Vt., and Anson Burlingame, of Mass., are all looking after it. "Petoubun" (Peep-of-Day,) is the name of a newspaper, in the Chippewa language, just started at Sarnia, by the Rev. Thomas Huriburt. The London Sporting Life says that Tom Sayers will leave England on the 10th day of April next, for the United States. The convicts in the penitentiary of Mississippi are engaged in manufacturing tents for the army of the State. Mr. Lincoln will give his first public reception at the White House on Friday evening next. The dwelling of Lewis Cooke, in Monroe county, Va., was destroyed by fire on the 24th ult. Jno. O'Neal has been sent to the chain-gang at Memphis, Tennessee, for vending obscene works. The twenty-five public libraries of Boston contain 307,242 volumes. The Hon. J. A. Parker, the new United States Consul, h
delegations called on Mr. Lincoln this morning to pay their respects. The most prominent among them were those from Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. The former (as did the latter,) assembled in the East-room, and upon the President making his appearance, Hon. Charles F. Train, on behalf of the delegation, said Massachusetts had read his Inaugural and would stand by it, and from none would it meet with a more cordial support than from the Old Bay State. Mr. Lincoln replied substantially h whatever of ability and sense of justice I could bring to bear. If it meets the approbation of our good friends in Massachusetts, I shall be exceedingly gratified. While I hope it will meet with the approbation of friends everywhere, I am thankfates from another--(cries of "good")--nor one section from another. I shall be gratified to have the good friends of Massachusetts and others who have thus far supported me in these national views still to support me in carrying them out. Mr.
Marriages in Massachusetts. --The Registration Report records some singular facts connected with the 11,475 marriages in Massachusetts in 1859. The great majority of the persons married were between the ages of 20 and 30; the average age at marriage being 28 4 years for men, and 24 6 for women Of the men, however, only 195 were under 20, while 2,474 brides were under that age. And of those above 30 and under 35, the men numbered 1,349. but the women only 713. It is curious to observe thMassachusetts in 1859. The great majority of the persons married were between the ages of 20 and 30; the average age at marriage being 28 4 years for men, and 24 6 for women Of the men, however, only 195 were under 20, while 2,474 brides were under that age. And of those above 30 and under 35, the men numbered 1,349. but the women only 713. It is curious to observe that of the women married before the age of twenty, 10 were married for the second time. It appears, however, that less widows than widowers were married, the widows married numbering 1,033, and the widowers 1,752. 16 widowers were married for the fourth time, and two for the fifth time. Two widows were married for the fourth time. The age of the parties married shows some remarkable combinations and anom lies. Two venerable widowers, each over eighty years of age, were married in 1859; a