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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 52 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) or search for Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 7 document sections:

Scott, a negro, was, previously to 1834, held as a slave in Missouri by Dr. Emerson, a surgeon in the U. S. Army. In that year, the doctor was transferred to the military post at Rock Island, in the State of Illinois, and took his slave with him. Here, Major Taliaferro (also of the army) had, in 1835, in his service a black known as Harriet, whom he likewise held as his slave. The major was transferred that year to Fort Snelling, on the other side of the Missippi, in what is now known as Minnesota, but was then an unorganized territory of the United States, expressly covered by the Slavery Prohibition included in the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Dr. Emerson was likewise transferred to Fort Snelling in 1836, and here bought Harriet of Major Taliaferro, and held her and Dred as his slaves; they being married to each other with his consent soon after his arrival at the Fort. Two children were born to them; Eliza, in 1838, on board the steamboat Gipsy, on their way down the Mississippi
e exceptions. To swell the resistless tide, Minnesota and Oregon--both in the extreme North--each ok position in line with the dominant party--Minnesota by a small, Oregon by an overwhelming, majorhe two swelling by four Senators and four Minnesota chose three Members to the House, on the ass under an equivocal organization; bring over Minnesota by a close vote; and swell their majority inlly, until it numbered twenty-four. Indiana, Minnesota, California, and Oregon, were still represeney, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota, decidedly hostile to the Administration; anew Jersey, Bigler, of Pennsylvania, Rice, of Minnesota, Bright, of Indiana, Gwin and Latham, of Cal, of California, Fitch, of Indiana, Rice, of Minnesota, and perhaps one or two others, had been knoMissouri, 4 1/2; Tennessee, 11; Kentucky, 9; Minnesota, 1 1/2; Oregon, 3--105. Nays--Maine, 5; Nois, 11 ; Michigan, ; Wisconsin, 5; Iowa, 4; Minnesota, 2 1/2; California, 4--198. The question[1 more...]
ding to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.2,801 Pennsylvania 268,030 Fusion vote apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.78,871 Fusion vote apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.100,000 12,776 Ohio 231,610 187,232 11,405 12,194 Indiana 139,033 115,509 12,295 5,306 Illinois 172,161 160,215 2,404 4,913 Michigan 88,480 65,057 805 405 Wisconsin 86,110 65,021 888 161 Minnesota 22,069 11,920 748 62 Iowa 70,409 55,111 1,048 1,748 California 39,173 38,516 34,334 6,817 Oregon 5,270 3,951 5,006 183   Total Free States 1,831,180 1,128,049 279,211 130,151 Slave states. States. Lincoln. Douglas. Breckinridge. Bell. Delaware 3,815 1,023 7,337 3,864 Maryland 2,294 5,966 42,482 41,760 Virginia 1,929 16,290 74,323 74,681 North Carolina (no ticket) 2,701 48,539 44,990 South Carolina [Chosen by the Legislature.] Georgia (no ticket) 11,590 51,889 42,886 Al
follows: The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island. Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania ; and all new States annexed and admitted into the Union or formed or erected within the jurisdiction of said States, or by the junction of two or more of the same or of parts thereof, or out of territory acquired north of said States, shall constitute one section, to be known as the North. The States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas, and all new States annexed or admitted into the Union, or erected within the jurisdiction of any of said States, or by the junction of two or more of the same, or of parts thereof, or out of territory now held or hereafter acquired north of latitude 36° 30′ and east of the crest of the Rocky Mountains, shall constitute another section, to be known as the West. The States of Oregon and California, and ceive the wisdom of dividing a legislature into two houses--once c
egiments of infantry or riflemen only — each regiment to be composed of 780 men — the apportionment of regiments to the several States called on being as follows: Maine 1 New Hampshire 1 Vermont 1 Massachusetts 2 Rhode Island 1 Connecticut 1 New York 17 New Jersey 4 Pennsylvania 16 Delaware 1 Tennessee 2 Maryland 4 Virginia 3 North Carolina 2 Kentucky 4 Arkansas 1 Missouri 4 Ohio 13 Indiana 6 Illinois 6 Michigan 1 Iowa 1 Minnesota 1 Wisconsin 1 The 94 regiments thus called for would form a total of 73,391 men — the residue of the 75,000 being expected from the Federal District. I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate, and aid, this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and existence, of our national Union, and the perpetuity of popular Government, and to redress wrongs already long enough endured. I deem it proper to say that the first service assigned to the forces hereby called forth w<
r, were sent to Fort Mifflin, on the Delaware, as prisoners. Gen. Benj. F. Butler sailed, August 26, 1861, from Fortress Monroe, as commander of a military and naval force whose destination was secret. It consisted of the fifty-gun frigates Minnesota, Wabash, and Cumberland, with four smaller national vessels and two steam transports, carrying 800 soldiers, with two tugs laden with supplies; the Naval force under the command of Corn. Stringham. Arriving the second night off the entrance thras. Explanations to the plan of the Bombardment of Forts Hatteras and Clark. A. United States troops and marines. B. Masked Batteries. C. Scouting parties awaiting the bombardment D. Small Boats. 1. Cumberland. 2. Wabash. 3. Minnesota. 4 and 5. Susquehanna and Monticello, during the afternoon of the bombardment. 6, 7, and 8. Steamers Pawnee, Harriet Lane, and Monticello, protecting the landing of troops. by the new Forts Hatteras and Clark, mounting five and ten guns r
Henry, vote on Missouri Compromise, 80. Memminger, Chas. G., of S. C., 34-1; 429. Mervine, Com. Wm., destroys the Judah, 601-2. Methodists, the, and Slavery, 120-21. Mexico, 148; 176; war with, 186-7; 188; 190. Milwaukee, Wisc., fugitive-slave case at, 215. Milton, John, of Fla., in Dem. Convention, 314. Milledgeville, Ga., Military Convention at, 337. miles, Wm. Porcher, of S. C., 337; 448. miles, Col. D. J., at Bull Run, 552. Milroy, Gen., (Union,) 527. Minnesota, 300; 301. Mississippi, 128; 157; 211; Foote chosen Governor, 211; withdraws from the Democratic Convention, 314; 330; 344; secession of, and the vote thereon, 347-3; 350; population in 1860; 351; Mr. Aughey's experience, etc., 514. Missouri, struggle for the admission of, 74 to 80; 108; 225; 235; 262; withdraws from the Douglas Convention, 318; Jackson chosen Governor, 341; refuses to secede, 349; population in 1860, 351: 460; 489; Jackson calls for 50,000 militia, 491-2, 555; map of