hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 52 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) or search for Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

they did not, to provision them. At half-past 7 made general signal, Attack batteries, but be careful not to fire near the battery in our possession. At eight A. M. Susquehanna leading, opened fire on Fort Hatteras, the Wabash following; Minnesota passing inside of the Wabash, anchored between her and the Susquehanna and opened fire at a quarter past eight o'clock. At nine the Cumberland came in under sail, handled handsomely, and anchored in excellent position on the starboard bow of th unpleasant hole in the wall, but not until several holes had been made in her hull, while her topsail was badly torn and her port waist boat hung from a single davit. A carpenter was despatched to her assistance. The Wabash, Susquehanna, and Minnesota resumed the attack, and continued an hour or two, aided at last by the Cumberland, which promptly returned on hearing the sound of the heavy firing. It was apparent, however, that the rebels had taken to the bomb-proofs, for they paid but litt
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 114. fight at Goose Creek, Virginia, October 22, 1861. (search)
sible enterprise was entered upon with a spirit and energy that knew no such word as fail, and between 9 o'clock P. M. of the 23d, and five o'clock A. M. of the 24th, every man, horse, and piece of artillery was safely withdrawn from the Virginia shore and landed on this side again without an accident or the loss of a man or horse, save the casualty of the fight. The fortitude, endurance, and energy displayed by the men detailed to perform this work, deserve the highest commendation. The Minnesota lumbermen performed their part with such skill as to merit special notice. The courage and coolness of the officers and men of my brigade, in most part, as exhibited in their crossing the river, engaging the enemy, and their orderly withdrawal across again, give reliable assurance of their efficiency. It may not be improper here to say, that the result of this movement, as a reconnoissance, must prove highly beneficial to any future movement in that direction. Each order was strictly