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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Autobiographical sketch. (search)
idate for the Legislature, but was badly beaten, as the county had become strongly wedded to the opposite party. My practice had become very considerable, and at the close of my professional career, I believe I was regarded as among the best lawyers in my section of the State. My most important contest at the bar and my greatest triumph was in a contested will case in Lowndes County, Mississippi, in the autumn of 1852, in which a very large amount of property was involved. I went to Mississippi to attend to this case specially, and I contended single-handed and successfully with three of the ablest lawyers of that State. I had in a very limited degree the capacity for popular speaking as generally practised in the States, and it was regarded that my forte at the law was not before a jury as an advocate, but on questions of law before the court, especially in cases of appeal. I was never blessed with popular or captivating manners, and the consequence was that I was often
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 1: the invasion of Virginia. (search)
he Junction, for the purpose of watching the fords of Bull Run immediately above its junction with the Occoquon, and those on the latter stream above the same point. At this time no brigades had been formed, but in a few days the regiments under General Beauregard's command were organized into six brigades, as follows: a brigade of South Carolina troops under Brigadier General Bonham, a brigade of Alabama and Louisiana troops under Brigadier General Ewell, a brigade of South Carolina and Mississippi troops under Brigadier General D. R. Jones, a brigade of Virginia troops under Colonel George H. Jerrett, who was subsequently replaced by Brigadier General Longstreet, a brigade of Virginia troops under Colonel Philip St. George Cocke, and a brigade composed of the 7th and 24th Virginia, and the 4th South Carolina Regiments under my command, but the 4th South Carolina had been sent to Leesburg in Loudoun and did not join, it being subsequently replaced by the 7th Louisiana Regiment.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 21: invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
's division,--and Brigadier General Edward Johnson having been promoted and assigned to the command of Trimble's division, formerly Jackson's. A third corps was formed, composed of the division of Anderson (taken from the 1st corps), Heth's and Pender's; and General A. P. Hill was made lieutenant general and assigned to the command of it, and two divisions of four brigades each were formed out of it and two brigades, one of which was brought from North Carolina and the other formed of Mississippi regiments taken from other brigades, to the command of which division Brigadier Generals Heth and Pender were promoted, respectively. My inspector general, Lieutenant Colonel John M. Jones, and Colonel James A. Walker of the 13th Virginia Regiment were made brigadier generals, and the former was assigned to J. R. Jones' brigade in Johnson's division, and the latter to Rodes' (the old Stonewall brigade), in the same division, both promotions well deserved. General Lee now determin
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Conclusion. (search)
as soon as I was in a condition to travel, I started on horseback for the Trans-Mississippi Department to join the army of General Kirby Smith, should it hold out; with the hope of at least meeting an honorable death while fighting under the flag of my country. Before I reached that Department, Smith's army had also been surrendered, and, without giving a parole, after a long, weary and dangerous ride from Virginia, through the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Texas, I finally succeeded in leaving the country. Letter from General Lee. Hdqrs., C. S. Armies, 30th March, 1865. Lt.-General J. A. Early, Franklin co., Va. General,--My telegram will have informed you that I deem a change of commanders in your Department necessary; but it is due to your zealous and patriotic services that I should explain the reasons that prompted my action. The situation of affairs is such that we can neglect no means calculated to develop the re
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
ision, 344, 417, 418 Middle Mountain, 331 Middle River, 366, 368 Middle Road, 369, 433, 436 Middletown, 75, 135, 264, 266, 368-69, 386, 397-98, 414, 444, 446, 447, 453 Miles' Division (U. S. A.), 31, 44, 137 Milford, 117, 433, 436, 450, 453 Military Institute, 374, 380 Millboro, 330, 461 Mills' Gap, 284 Millwood, 164, 240, 397, 406, 420, 423, 429 Milroy, General (U. S. A.), 40, 101, 240, 244-46, 250-51, 475 Mine Run, 317-19, 321-23, 325-26, 343, 345 Mississippi Troops, 3, 15, 19, 60-61, 63, 67, 69, 204, 208, 234, 236, 466 Missouri, 158, 460 Mitchell's Ford, 5, 7, 9, 15, 19, 20, 27-28, 31, 35, 60, 61 Monaghan, Colonel, 193, 207, 409 Monocacy, 135, 186, 387-88, 391-92- 93, 395, 417, 475 Monocacy Junction, 386, 402 Monterey Springs, 281 Montgomery County, 327, 479 Montreal, Canada, 473 Moore, Captain, 465 Moore, Lieutenant, 311 Moorefield, 334-339, 404, 416 Moorefield Valley, 334 Morrison, Lieutenant, 177, 216, 477