hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) or search for Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 17 document sections:

1 2
entire battle, and who contested every inch of the ground with his forces thrown out as skirmishers in the woods, and succeeded in occupying the original ground on the right, after the repulse of a body of cavalry. I deem it worthy of remark that during a part of the engagement my regiment and that of the enemy, at some points, became so intermingled as scarcely to be able to distinguish friends from foes, and my forces made several prisoners, among whom was Lieutenant-Colonel Boone, of Mississippi, who is now in Washington, and fully recognizes his captors. I regard it as an event of rare occurrence in the annals of history that a regiment of volunteers, not over three months in the service, marched up without flinching to the mouth of batteries of cannon supported by thousands of infantry, and opened and maintained a fire until one-fifth of the whole regiment were killed, wounded, or made prisoners before retiring, except for purposes of advantage of position. My heart is fu
igns against the institutions of the South, checked as he must necessarily be by a Senate and judiciary, if not a House of Representatives, without one overt act, can justify any portion of the South, even to their own consciences, in an act of rebellion? There is one notable feature in the attitude of the South. The cry of disunion comes, not from those who suffer most from northern outrage, but from those who suffer least. It comes from South Carolina, and Georgia, and Alabama, and Mississippi, whose slave property is rendered comparatively secure by the intervention of other slaveholding States between them and the free States, and not from Delaware, and Maryland, and Virginia, and Kentucky, and Tennessee, and Missouri, which lose a hundred slaves by abolition thieves where the first-named States lose one. Why are not the States that suffer most, loudest in their cry for disunion? It is because their position enables them to see more distinctly than you do, at a distance, th
Doc. 61.-Gov. Pettus' proclamation. Executive office, Jackson, Miss., June 23, 1861. Whereas, it is probable that Mississippi will be called upon to put forth her full military strength; and whereas, arms manufactured specially for war cannot be secured in sufficient numbers to arm all who are willing and anxious to taker rifles,) and hold themselves in readiness to move at an hour's notice. If seconded in these measures, as I hope and believe I shall be, by the gallant men of Mississippi, we will then be able to send our insulted, invaded, and outraged friends of the Border States all the aid they may need, and have arms enough left to make Missures, as I hope and believe I shall be, by the gallant men of Mississippi, we will then be able to send our insulted, invaded, and outraged friends of the Border States all the aid they may need, and have arms enough left to make Mississippi a land of fire to an invading foe. John J. Pettus. --Jackson Mississippian, June 25.
ry is as impossible as for one born blind to describe a rainbow; his State is his country, and his American citizenship is a bauble compared with his citizenship there. Point him to the flag of his country, and he sees only the one star which typifies his State; every other is, to that, rayless and cold. Talk to him of the Nation, and he replies, South Carolina Speak of national prosperity and happiness, and he responds, the Old Dominion! Refer to the honor of the Nation, and he shouts Mississippi! Arkansas! Texas! Lead his mind where you will, and like a cat he always returns to the particular spot he inhabits, and which he calls his State! Ever regarding that, he raises not his head to behold the glorious country, which claims his first devotion as an American, his highest love as a freeman. To hold that allegiance is due from a citizen to one of the United States, otherwise than as the term imports mere obedience to its rightful authority while he resides there, is a gross
Doc. 66.-message of President Lincoln. July 4, 1861. Fellow-citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives:--Having been convened on an extraordinary occasion, as authorized by the Constitution, your attention is not called to any ordinary subject of legislation. At the beginning of the present Presidential term, four months ago, the functions of the Federal Government were found to be generally suspended within the several States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida, excepting only those of the Post-Office Department. Within these States all the Forts, Arsenals, Dock-Yards, Custom-Houses, and the like, including the movable and stationary property in and about them, had been seized, and were held in open hostility to this Government, excepting only Forts Pickens, Taylor, and Jefferson, on and near the Florida coast, and Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, South Carolina. The forts thus seized, had been put in improved condition, n
three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the Confederate States, and within every subsequent term of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every fifty thousand, but each State shall have at least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of South Carolina shall be entitled to choose six; the State of Georgia ten; the State of Alabama nine; the State of Florida two; the State of Mississippi seven; the State of Louisiana six; and the State of Texas six. 4. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State, the Executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to, fill such vacancies. 5. The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment; except that any judicial or other federal officer resident and acting solely within the limits of any State, may be impeached by a vote of two-thir
Doc. 109.-the Confederate Government. the Executive. President,Jefferson Davis, of Miss. Vice-President,Alex. H. Stephens, of Ga. the Cabinet. Secretary of State,Robert Toombs, Ga. Secretary of Treasury,C. L. Memminger, S. C. Secretary of War,Leroy P. Walker, Ala. Secretary of the Navy,Stephen R. Mallory, Fla. Postmaster-General,John H. Reagan, Texas. Attorney-General,Judah P. Benjamin, La. members of Congress. Virginia.  James A. Seddon.  W. Ballard Preston. 1.R. M. A. Nisbot. 6.Benjamin H. Hill. 7.A. R. Wright. 8.Thomas R. R. Cobb. 9.Augustus H. Kenan. 10.Alex. H. Stephens. Louisiana. 1.John Perkins, Jr. 2.A. De Clouet. 3.Charles H. Conrad. 4.D. F. Kenner. 5.Edward Sparrow. 6.Henry Marshall. Mississippi. 1.Wiley P. Harris. 2.Walter Brooke. 3.W. S. Wilson. 4.A. M. Clayton. 5.W. S. Barry. 6.James T. Harrison. 7.J. A. P. Campbell. South Carolina. 1.R. B. Rhett, Sr. 2.R. W. Barnwell. 3.L. M. Keitt. 4.James Chesnut, Jr. 5.C. G. Memmin
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 114.-the Cherokees and the war. (search)
the chief of the Cherokee nation and various rebel authorities and citizens of Arkansas: State of Arkansas, Executive Department, little Rock, Jan. 29, 1861. To His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost certain that the States having slave property within their borders will, in consequence of repeated Northern aggressions, separate themselves and withdraw from the Federal Government. South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana have already, by action of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, and Maryland will probably pursue the same course by the 4th of March next. Your people, in their institutions, productions, latitude, and natural sympathies, are allied to the common brotherhood of the slave-holding States. Our people and yours are natural allies in war, and friends in peace. Your country is salubrious and fertil
Doc. 117 1/2.-Mississippi secession ordinance. Adopted January 9th, 1861. The people of Mississippi, in convention assembled, do ordain and declare, and it is hereby ordained and declared, as follows, to wit: That all the laws and ordinances by which the said State of Mississippi became a member of the Federal Union of thMississippi, in convention assembled, do ordain and declare, and it is hereby ordained and declared, as follows, to wit: That all the laws and ordinances by which the said State of Mississippi became a member of the Federal Union of the United States of America be, and the same are hereby, repealed; and that all obligations on the part of said State or the people thereof to observe the same be withdrawn; and that the said State shall hereby resume the rights, functions, and powers, which, by any of said laws and ordinances, were conveyed to the Government of theState of Mississippi became a member of the Federal Union of the United States of America be, and the same are hereby, repealed; and that all obligations on the part of said State or the people thereof to observe the same be withdrawn; and that the said State shall hereby resume the rights, functions, and powers, which, by any of said laws and ordinances, were conveyed to the Government of the said United States, and is dissolved from all the obligations, restraints, and duties incurred to the said Federal Union, and shall henceforth be a free, sovereign, and independent State.
ith such liberal devotion to the cause as to gratify the heart of the patriot, and convince both friends and foes that Mississippi is determined to make this a successful struggle against Northern tyranny, if the united efforts of all classes, ages,lass against whom suits have been and will be instituted, I have again called you into extra session. The people of Mississippi, on a former occasion of great pecuniary embarrassment, refused to permit forced sales, and sheriffs found themselves ly to be annoyed by the enemy, an agreement has been entered into with the Governors of Louisiana and Alabama by which Mississippi bears an equal portion of the expense of manning and arming small steamers — suited to shallow waters of the lakes andies, we are called to shed tears over the fallen brave who have watered the tree of liberty with their patriot blood. Mississippi will remember and honor their names. May the God of Justice give success to our arms and safety to our sons. John
1 2