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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 332 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 110 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 68 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 32 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 28 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 24 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 22 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 20 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 20 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) or search for Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) in all documents.

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lleged fugitive, in that it attained unusual publicity, and took place in New England after the North had begun to feel the first throbs of the profound agitation excited by the repudiation of the Missouri Compromise in the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska bill. On the 2d of June, 1854--the repudiation of the Missouri compact having recently been consummated in the passage and Presidential approval of the Kansas-Nebraska bill — Anthony Burns having been adjudged a fugitive at Boston, President Nebraska bill — Anthony Burns having been adjudged a fugitive at Boston, President Pierce ordered the U. S. cutter Morris to take him from that city to life-long bondage in Virginia. The following spirited stanzas thereupon appeared (June 13th) in The New York Tribune: Hail to the Stars and Stripes. hail to the Stars and Stripes! The boastful flag all hail! The tyrant trembles now, And at the sight grows pale; The Old World groans in pain, And turns her eye to see, Beyond the Western Main, The emblem of the Free. Hail to the Stars and Stripes! Hope beams in every ray! And,
y 2, 1853. a bill organizing the Territory of Nebraska (covering the same district); which bill, bei. to the Senate a bill to organize the Territory of Nebraska, embracing (as before) the region lyingion. Instead of one Territory, to be called Nebraska, and stretching from the parallel of 36° 30! ther to comprise the residue, and be known as Nebraska. (The south line of Kansas was moved northwaavery within the Territories to be organized--Nebraska and Kansas. So far as I am individually concrth Carolina, during the debate on the Kansas-Nebraska bill, if I should choose to emigrate to Kansavery few days after the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska act, hundreds of leading Missourians crossed omely, by a circuitous route through Iowa and Nebraska; but who, on entering Kansas, were met by a Fsouri Compromise by the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska bill. Those, of whatever party in the past, d on the table, by 141 votes to 59. The anti-Nebraska delegates, to the number of about fifty, ther[10 more...]
ractical importance. Besides, it is a judicial question, which legitimately belongs to the Supreme Court of the United States, before whom it is now pending, and will, it is understood, be speedily and finally settled. To their decision, in common with all good citizens, I shall cheerfully submit. Not many days thereafter, the decision and opinions thus heralded, and commended as a new and admirable exemplification of Popular Sovereignty, and the happy conception embodied in the Kansas-Nebraska bill, were revealed, with due trumpeting and laudation, to an expectant world. Chief Justice Taney, in pronouncing the decision of the Court, which nullified the Missouri Restriction, or any restriction by Congress on the boundless diffusion of Slavery throughout the territories of the Union, commenced by denying to Dred Scott, or to any person whose ancestors were imported to this country and sold as slaves, any right to sue in a court of the United States. He said: The question befo
f numbers, taking advantage of a gentle ridge running east and west, at some distance south of the town. The hostile forces remained through the night about half a mile from each other, with a corn-field between, each man covered by the grass and the inequalities of the ground, their positions only revealed by the flashes and reports of their guns. When the sun rose next morning, the Missourians had decamped. Capt. Brown left soon after for the East by the circuitous land route through Nebraska and Iowa; that through Missouri being closed against Free-State men. He took a fugitive slave in his wagon, and saw him safely on his way to freedom. He made two or three visits to the East in quest of aid and of funds, returning for the last time to Southern Kansas in the Autumn of 1858. Peace had finally been secured in all that part of the Territory lying north of the Kansas river, by the greatly increased numbers and immense preponderance of the Free-State settlers, rendering raids fr
All the Free States were strongly represented, with Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, the District of Columbia, and the Territories of Kansas and Nebraska. There was a delegation present claiming to represent Texas, but it was afterward found to be fraudulent. David Wilmot, of Pennsylvania, was chosen temporary Cotal and final suppression of that execrable traffic. 10. That in the recent vetoes, by their Federal Governors, of the acts of the Legislatures of Kansas and Nebraska, prohibiting Slavery in those Territories, we find a practical illustration of the boasted Democratic principle of Non-Intervention and popular Sovereignty embodied in the Kansas-Nebraska bill, and a demonstration of the deception and fraud involved therein. 11. That Kansas should, of right, be immediately admitted as a State, under the Constitution recently formed and adopted by the House of Representatives. 12. That, while providing revenue for the support of the General Governme
s as to assure all faithful citizens who have been disturbed in their rights, of a certain and speedy restoration to them, under the Constitution and the laws. And, having thus chosen our course, without guile and with pure purpose, let us renew our trust in God, and go forward without fear and with manly hearts. Several of the opening days of the Session were mainly devoted by the House to the consideration of disputed claims to seats — there being rival claimants from Oregon, from Nebraska, and from the Ist district of Pennsylvania, beside three members in all from Virginia, whereof two (Messrs. Carlile and Whaley) were chosen from Western districts, by heavy votes, on the regular day of election; while the other (Mr. Upton) was chosen under different auspices. The Convention which passed the Ordinance of Secession had assumed power to annul or suspend the law which provides that a regular election shall be held, and Members of Congress semi-annually chosen thereat, on the f
admit California, and organize Utah and New Mexico, 207; 222; bill to organize Nebraska, 226; his report accompanying it, 227-8; the Nebraska-Kansas bill. 228; respohe, wrecked, with slaves, 176. English, William H., of Ind., proviso to tho Nebraska bill, 233; 250; a Peace proposition, 374. enterprise, the, driven into Bermy T. Johnson, 465; is sent to Fort McHenry by Gen. Butler, 529. Kansas, the Nebraska-Kansas struggle, 224 to 251; admitted as a State, 251. (See John Brown, Borde the President's call, 460; letter to, supposed to be from Gen. Scott, 549. Nebraska, the Kansas struggle, 224 to 251. Nelson, Gen. Wm., at Piketon, Ky., 616, at Bull Run,539; 549. Richardson, Wm. A., of Ill., reports bill organizing Nebraska, 225; 233; moves an amendment, 234. Richmond, Va., Breckinridge Convention Texas, beaten for Governor, by Houston, 339. Rusk, Thomas J., of Texas, on Nebraska, 226. Russell, Col. Wm. H., of Mo., to Rollins, 80. Russell, Lieut., des