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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 644 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 128 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 104 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 74 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 66 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 50 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 50 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 50 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 48 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) or search for New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) in all documents.

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Mr. William Hone's "Baby Waker," but the lateness of the hour prevented any extensive demonstration being made. The Savannah Brass Band, Robert Low leader, composed of colored men, serenaded the Mayor, Col. Lawton, and several other citizens. Several public and private buildings were illuminated. A division of the Territory. The New York Post makes up the following from the report of the Commissioner of the Land Office for 1860: Free States. Sq. Miles. Maine35,000 New Hampshire9,200 Vermont10,212 Massachusetts7,800 Rhode Island1,306 Connecticut4,750 New York47,000 New Jersey8,300 Pennsylvania46,000 Ohio39,964 Indiana33,800 Illinois55,410 Michigan56,451 Wisconsin53,924 Iowa55,045 Minnesota83,591 Oregon95,274 California188,981 832,717 Free Territo's. Kansas126,283 Nebraska342,488 Minnesota81,960 Wash'ton.193,071 Utah220,196 963,948 Sq. miles1,795,965 Population19,000,000 Slave States. Sq. Miles. Delaware2,120 Maryla
whose contributions on the troubles of the day have recently appeared in the Dispatch, has added the following to her several appeals for her country. Her initials and locality are familiar to all: "We're Brothers All." The gale came piping over the wild, Once, at the musing hour, And grove and forest lifted up Their wind-harps to its power, And words were to the music set, As swelled the blended strain-- "We're brothers all — we're brothers all-- From Mexico flood to Maine." New Hampshire's kings, a line of fire To Allegheny sent, For link-boy Lightning thrilled the wires, And on the message went; While to the Telegraph replied Pacific's rocky chain-- "We're brothers all — we're brothers all, From Mexico flood to Maine." The mighty rivers woke to sound-- Missouri, broad and brave; Bold Hudson, with his thronging keels; Ohio's crystal wave; Niagara, glorious and sublime, Lent thunder to the strain-- "We're brothers all — we're brothers all, From Mexico flood to Maine." <